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Montreux 1972


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Montreux 1972 + Live at Montreux 1972 + Paris 1969 (CD/DVD)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Stan Getz
  • Directors: Stan Getz
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Eagle Vision
  • DVD Release Date: October 29, 2013
  • Run Time: 62 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00FEI1X2C
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #117,037 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Stan Getz is one of the all-time great tenor saxophonists and played the Montreux JazzFestival on a number of occasions. This concert from 1972 was his first appearance there and features him in a quartet with Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke and Tony Williams. Getz had spent most of the sixties working in a bossa nova style but the early 70s marked a change indirection to fusion and this concert is a fine example of his exploration of this style.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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Five ICONIC Stars! The DVD captures the legendary Hall of Fame tenor sax titan Stan Getz in 1972 during his first of many appearances over the years at the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland, with as heavyweight a rhythm section as imaginable, all leaders of their own historic groups, all innovators, and as of 2014, three are in the DownBeat Hall of Fame with the remaining one a strong possibility: master keyboardist Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke on double bass plucking and fingering at times like a pianist, and the always dynamic Tony Williams on drums dropping bombs, snare figurations, rim shots, and cymbal splashes. These relaxed-intensity performances are absolutely outstanding and the four play like old friends, blending and soloing magnificently with great imagination and empathy. Indeed, all had played on the Getz album "Captain Marvel" which features most of this particular set's songs. This was the first of five Corea compositions played that day at Montreux and on "Captain Marvel" Getz is in splendid improvisational form taking the song for a delightful uptempo ride with hairpin twists and turns, giving way to a wonderful Corea solo, with Williams and Clarke pushing Getz ever onward to the end. Always the consummate lyrical balladeer, Getz and the group treat the crowd to marvelous versions of Billy Strayhorn's "Lush Life", Benny Golson's "I Remember Clifford" (Clarke's big sound and Williams' sensitive support are awesome), and a beautiful version of another Corea favorite "Windows".Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By farington on June 4, 2014
I just watched this video on a drummer-oriented website, and immediately ordered it from Amazon. So I have kind of a single focus for this video at the moment, i.e. I bought it to watch Tony Williams. This was the period (1972) when I'd just started getting into Tony Williams' Lifetime; but by then Tony had started playing in other people's groups besides his own (record company/music biz burnout, I think). There aren't many videos of him playing with Lifetime but his drumming on this video has the vitality of his Lifetime work, even if the musical setting's a lot different. I've watched his solo on this video over and over on the other website, and his performance throughout is always tasteful, musical, energetic, and inimitable.

And the rest of the band aren't exactly slouches, either. Great video all-around, highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By rayja on June 4, 2014
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Stan Getz, like many of the founding fathers, had a long and winding road to get to where they got. Of course, he had a few of the great ones that proceeded him to follow. But like his kind they were always searching for something new. On this concert in 1972, he is in his prime. This is in color and is top notch video for the time. He has an all star band and he feeds off of them. Stan sets his horn on fire in a way I've never heard before. This is a departure from videos like The Last Recording. Don't get me wrong, that one is a must have. I have always thought of him as a great balladeer. On this this one, he sounds like he's heading for the stars. on a couple
of tunes. This is a must have for quality video of Stan in earlier years, in color.
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