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Moog Cookbook


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Audio CD, May 7, 1996
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$69.94 $7.42

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 7, 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Restless Records
  • ASIN: B000003BL2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #173,899 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Black Hole Sun
2. Buddy Holly
3. Basket Case
4. Come Out And Play
5. Free Fallin'
6. Are You Gonna Go My Way?
7. Smells Like Teen Spirit
8. Evenflow
9. The One I Love
10. Rockin' In The Free World

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
56%
4 star
44%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 16 customer reviews
It's good to have for novelty purposes.
R. Toomey
Another interesting aspect of this song is the atonal nature of the melody when the band is covering the singing.
Purple Monkey Dishwasher
To appreciate this album, you must understand it was done tongue and cheek.
Paul A. Fucito

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R. Toomey on January 5, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This is like nothing you've heard before. This album is so funny that you can't believe that you're actually listening to it. It is a great collection of modern rock classics played on a Moog Synthesizer. My favorite is "Black Hole Sun". You will definitely get a kick out of this. It's good to have for novelty purposes.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Paul A. Fucito on August 8, 2001
Format: Audio CD
To appreciate this album, you must understand it was done tongue and cheek. Great vintage synths humourously cover 90's modern rock classics (and Neil Young's "Rockin In The Free World"). This is for any fan of vintage electronic music like Kraftwerk, Human League, Jan Hammer, Tangerine Dream and Soft Cell. Sort of a 90's "Stars on 45" idea.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Wing on May 12, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
How do you describe this music? "Retro lounge space robot analog synth novelty pop covers." Think Martin Denny meets Giorgio Moroder meets Spike Jones meets 90s cover band and that'll give you a start.

Regardless of what you call it, Moog Cookbook is awesome. These guys have imagination, a sense of humor, a huge musical vocabulary, real-deal old-school analog synthesizers, and they know how to use them.

While this CD may not be for everyone, if you like lounge or novelty or want to hear some of your favorite rock and pop hits done with a crazy twist it's doubtful you will be disappointed by Moog Cookbook. If you're a fan of analog synthesizers, this is a must-buy.

They have another CD out, Ye Olde Space Band: Plays Classic Rock Hits, but this one is my favorite of the two (by a slim margin). If you're new to Moog Cookbook, definitely start here first.

Attention Moog Cookbook guys: Please give us more!!!
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Johnny Heering on June 15, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This album features all-moog versions of your favorite rock hits of the mid-'90s. It's a lot of fun to hear these songs in this way. Goofy, silly fun that is not meant to be taken seriously. Not everybody will like it, but if you enjoy weird interpretations of popular songs, you should check it out.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sean A. Farias on November 30, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Brian Kehew and Roger Manning attempted to produce something that was scarcely tried by anyone previously; recreate some of the most popular songs of their day using solely Moog synthesizers. The Moog synthesizer, although revolutionary for its day, is seen as past its prime technologically. Popularized in the 1960s this synthesizer was one of the first to incorporate a transistor allowing to make it more portable than its vacuum tube predecessors. The Moog Cookbook in their self-titled album used this historical instrument not to show any up and coming technological advances, but rather focused on celebrating the instrument by pushing its limits while making subtle commentary on contemporary rock music.
Allow me to first qualify this album by saying that the artists likely did not aim for their songs to be taken entirely seriously. The producers of these songs probably intended for this music to represent something that was diametrically opposed to contemporary rock music. Some critics of rock music felt that in the late 80s and early 90s artists began to take themselves too seriously. A couple things spawned from these critiques. One obvious movement is "punk" and shifting towards the complete opposite end of the spectrum we have a more light hearted side such as The Moog Cookbook. Kehew and Manning took the seriousness out of rock by using upbeat springy sounds complete with space-like themes. I am inclined to believe after watching some live videos that Kehew and Manning wanted to stay close to the Moog synthesizer's portable/performative heritage since their commentary shines through more clearly dancing around with their spaceman attire.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jared Cunningham on March 15, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Moog Cookbook's self-titled album brings tons of wacky fun with synthesizer remixes of some of the world's popular rock and pop anthems. Each track gives the listener an exciting look at all of the incredible sounds that the synthesizer can produce. The group consists of two members, Brian Kehew and Roger Joseph Manning Jr. The duo stretches the limits of the analog synthesizer, the instrument-of-choice for this album, as the analog synthesizer is the only instrument used throughout the entire album. Kehew and Manning use no MIDI software instruments in this album, attempting to, as the members proclaim, to base their music on a period in time when the synthesizer was new and strange. The duo has most definitely succeeded in creating a new, strange, and exciting vibe with their self-titled record.

The album opens with Sungarden's "Black Hole Sun". The track gives the song a type of "festive" feel that provides a light-hearted, fun opening for their album. The album really kicks things off, however, with the second track - a remix of Weezer's "Buddy Holly". Moog Cookbook makes this song their own, adding a synthetic "swing bass" that acts as the backbone of the track. This song introduces a type of telharmonium tone to take the place of the vocal melody. This provides a really fun type of "hum-along". From the opening that sounds like the hum of the THX logo, through the epic introduction that sounds like the beginning of a broadway dance number, on through to when the hums fade out, and head-bobbing melody kicks in, "Buddy Holly" is easily a highlight of the entire album. Some of the album's other very strong points are the remix of Tom Petty's "Free Fallin'", which combines a high-pitched synthesizer melody with static-infested, muffled spoken word.
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