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Moon of Two Dark Horses Hardcover – September 12, 1995


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 218 pages
  • Publisher: Philomel; First Edition edition (September 12, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399227830
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399227837
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,594,203 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The plight of Native Americans during the Revolutionary War is eloquently conveyed in this affecting novel. Coshmoo, the only son of the Delaware Indian leader Queen Esther, describes his village on the banks of the Susquehanna River and his close friendship with Daniel Seibert, the son of nearby white settlers. As war breaks out between the Americans and the British, the Indians are being pressured into taking sides. But no matter who wins, they will lose their homeland, as is lyrically symbolized in Coshmoo's dreams of being pursued by an insatiable bear. The boys venture onto forbidden land in an abortive quest for a fabled tree that will restore peace to their peoples, but they only increase hostilities. Months later, their friendship survives the ultimate test when Daniel is captured by Coshmoo's British-allied Iroquois relatives and forced to run the gauntlet. Keehn (I Am Regina) establishes so clear a sense of foreboding that the reader is almost afraid to reach the ending; at the same time, her story seems so real that the reader will not want to escape its grip. Historical notes and an extensive bibliography add further substance to a deeply moving tale. Ages 10-14.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 7-9?In 1776, white settlers lived peacefully near a Delaware settlement led by Queen Esther near Pennsylvania's Susquehanna River. When the Revolutionary War broke out, the Delawares and other Native Americans were pressured to choose sides in the conflict or face annihilation. This novel, told through the voice of Queen Esther's 12-year-old son Coshmoo, is an account of his friendship with Daniel, a young white settler. Their idyllic life at the story's beginning is already threatened by a chasm of distrust between some of the Native Americans and some white settlers. Coshmoo and Daniel pledge their friendship to one another, and search the sacred land for the bones that would keep peace in their valley. They are unaware that the future will bring a test of their friendship. The narrative, based on a true incident, is well researched and lyrically written. The storyteller, Coshmoo, uses a believable formal tone to reveal his own personality as well as the way of life during the era. The plot is intricate, with flashbacks and dream sequences, and might be confusing at times. Sophisticated readers who love historical fiction will enjoy it.?Marilyn Long Graham, Lee County Library System, Fort Myers, FL
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
I absolutly loved Sally Keehn's first book, "I am Regina" which is a brutally honest story of a white girl taken captive by Delaware Indians during the French and Indian War. I read "The Moon of Two Dark Horses" simply because I enjoyed "I am Regina" so much.
"The Moon of Two Dark Horses" is a story of a Delaware Indian boy, Coshmoo, who witnesses the effects the Revolutionary War has on his peaceful and neutral village. Will his village side with the British and their Seneca allies or will the Delawares stay at peace with their American neighbors? War also threatens Coshmoo's personal life. An alliance with the British will ensure lead and powder for his beloved musket, but would endanger his lifelong friendship with an American boy, Daniel. It's a great premise, but Keehn is unable to really pull it off. The narrative is choppy with storylines and characters underdeveloped. A decent book, but not nearly as good as "I am Regina."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
An Indian named Coshmoo lives in small village on Tioga Point. His white friend Daniel once talked to a trader named Big Nose who sided with General Washington in the Revolutionary War. Big Nose told Daniel a story of a great water creature and gave him a tooth from it so when Daniel finds it, it will show him the way to stop the Revolutionary Way. When Coshmoo is told this from Daniel they go out in search of it on sacred land. The two boys get caught and aren't supposed to speak with each other ever again. Coshmoo learns that his older cousin Flying Wolf might attach Daniel's village. Flying Wolf sides with the Brittish when they come to Tioga Point. Can Daniel and Coshmoo stop their two societies from killing each other?

I think the message of the story was to never give up on your friends. When you think about it, if everybody was there for their friends then no one would ever be left alone. Friends are one of the biggest needs people have. So this is a very good message to spread to young people.

The author made a good point on how the family was really important to Indians. Coshmoo always dreamed to be like his father, hunt with a gun like his father and to free the fighting warriors. It was a great idea to have an Indian and a white settler work together to stop their societies from killing one another.

In conclusion, I really think this book gets two thumbs up because of the link between the Indian and the white settler. Even when they were told to not see each other both did not give up on their friend. Again, Moon of Two Dark Horses is a fabulous book and I strongly recommend it.

Jonathan Geneste
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lillian R. Rodberg on August 26, 1999
Format: Hardcover
There are books one can read as a child and return to at different ages and stages, each time finding more. "Moon of Two Dark Horses" is such a book. It's timeless, it's all but ageless (the age range assigned by the publisher seems a bit on the young side). Keehn's lyricism,her seamless weaving of local history and legend, Delaware Indian myth, and human fallibility into an all-too-universal tapestry, can best be appreciated by older, even--perhaps especially--adult readers. Friendship, love, courage, conflicting loyalties, and mistaken perceptions combine with Keehn's overarching sensitivity to nature to create a gripping narrative that impels the reader toward a masterfully foreshadowed tragedy as old as its Pennsylvania hills and as current as the headlines from Afghanistan. More than a book--an experience worth revisiting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alexandra on October 23, 1999
Format: Hardcover
A great book about the Delawares during colonial times. A story about a boy who yourns for a musket and when he gets it goes to drastic measures to get ammunition, while having a friend who's uncle hates him. When winter comes so do hard times when the British King pressures them to join the Britians in the Revolution.
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