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The Moon Over Star Hardcover – October 16, 2008


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 3
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Dial; First Edition edition (October 16, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803731078
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803731073
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 9.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #631,741 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3—A girl remembers the summer of 1969 and the first moon landing in this lushly illustrated, 40th-anniversary tribute. From her small town of Star, Mae and her family pray for the astronauts, she and her cousins build a homemade "rocket ship," and they all watch the historic moment on television. Pinkney's remarkable graphite, ink, and watercolor paintings evoke both the vastness of space and the intimacy of 1960s family life. Writing in the voice of a nine-year-old African-American girl, Aston is lyrical and sometimes evocative, though some of her narrative choices are overworked. The visual format of the free verses, with every line beginning with a capital letter, is distracting and interferes with the text's natural rhythms. The choice of the name Mae for the character who aspires to be an astronaut may be homage paid to Mae Jemison, and even the name of the fictional town seems to exist just for its metaphorical value. That said, this book offers children a close-up view of an experience that seems quaint today, but that was life-changing in 1969.—Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

The narrator of this picture book recalls the first walk on the moon, which she witnessed as a child on her grandparents’ farm. She and her cousins build their own spaceship from scrap wood and metal, but they run inside for the broadcast of Apollo 11’s lunar landing. Later, the family gathers around the television again to watch astronauts step onto the moon. As she tells her grandfather, “If they could go to the moon, / Maybe one day I could too!” Near the story’s end, Grandpa calls the girl “Mae,” a name recalling African American astronaut Mae Jemison. Spaced vertically in phrases like free verse alongside the large illustrations, the text combines dignity and immediacy in a clean, spare telling of events. Pinkney’s evocative artwork, created using graphite, ink, and watercolor, depicts a black family captivated, and perhaps subtly changed, by the moon landing in 1969. A quiet, satisfying tribute to this milestone in human history and its power to inspire others. Preschool-Grade 3. --Carolyn Phelan

More About the Author

Dianna Hutts Aston is the author of Mama's Wild Child / Papa's Wild Child, When You Were Born(Candlewick), and An Egg is Quiet(Chronicle). She lives in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Candace Rene Stewart on December 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The Moon Over the Stars

By: Diana Hutts Aston

Pictures by: Jerry Pinkney

Coretta Scott King Award Picture book

This book was about Apollo 11 landing on the moon this happened back in 1969. To us now that may not seem like such a big deal but back then it was. The book looks at this event in history through the eyes of the kids in the story. The excitement that comes with his part of history is made very apparent in the book. The story also allows us to know what the kids are thinking that they may be as they grow up. The art work in this book is very vivid and detailed, almost telling the story without knowing the words. This book makes the children want have bigger dreams.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ali Lee on December 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The Moon Over Star

Written By: Dianna Hutts Aston

Illustrated By: Jerry Pinkney

Coretta Scott King Honor Award-picture book

This book really captures the emotions and feelings that people were feeling when the first man walked on the moon. When we think about space and the moon now, it does not seem like that big of a deal or something that we would fixate on. Back in the 60's the moon was a true fascination for a lot of people and someone actually going into space or walking on the moon was unfathomable. This story takes you through the life of an 8 year old named Mae and her dreaming of going to the moon someday. This book will leave you in wonderment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ulyyf on June 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Further back than my memories go, there have ALWAYS been footprints on the moon. They were there more than a decade before I was born, so I always sorta took this for granted. There have ALWAYS, to my mind, been footprints on the moon (even though I know there haven't), and there have ALWAYS been space shuttles (even though I know there weren't) and there have ALWAYS been astronauts and so on.

For my young nieces, we have ALWAYS known about extra-solar planets (some of which are earth-like!), and we have ALWAYS had a camera on Mars, and Pluto has ALWAYS been something OTHER than a planet. We've always had cell phones and GPS and satellite TV, for that matter, as far as they're concerned.

It's hard enough for anybody born after the moon landings, I think, to really *feel* what a big thing that was. How quickly it became history, just another obvious fact that everybody knows!

This book does a good job of encapsulating the wonder and amazement that I imagine must have been all around for everybody (well, almost everybody) at the time. Space. It was different then, I guess.
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By Hestialady on February 23, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a fourth grade teacher of a culturally diverse classroom who is always looking for culturally specific books. This is a gorgeous book. My Students love it-- especially my African American girls. I'm always looking for books with strong role models and this one certainly fits.
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Format: Hardcover
Gorgeous illustrations, of course! Jerry Pinkney is unmatched.

This book captures the excitement and possibilities of the space age, while bringing in some sourness.

The children dream about space, construct their own play spaceship, and pray for the astronauts and their children.

The discordant notes come from the presumed holiness of President Kennedy in heaven, and from the grandfather who thinks government should be spending more money for poverty programs.

Human ingenuity pulls people out of poverty and government money keeps people dependent, so I explained that to my kids as I read this.

Gramps in this book ends up being a nice man, just beaten down by worries and cares.
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