Moonswept

July 1, 2009 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 1, 2009
  • Release Date: July 1, 2009
  • Label: 429 Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2009 SLG, LLC
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:49
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002EDMQY4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #167,375 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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When I first heard "September 11th..." I was amazed.
Greg Hills
The singing, the arrangments, the harmonies, the humor, the pathos, the incredible timing...... I am completely enamored with it.
sunborn
Too bad this album wasn't released in SACD, which would sound even better.
Dean Freedman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Larry D on March 20, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The Roches' first album as a trio in over a decade (baby sis Terre having gone mysteriously AWOL following 1995's Can We Go Home Now) is a triumph. Though all three sisters continued to make beautiful music in solo albums, projects with other musicians, and in particular Suzzy and Maggie's "Zero Church" and "Why the Long Face" albums, for those of us who have loved the Roches since their 1978 eponymous debut album, they all smelled like side projects. "Nice", we'd think, "but when's Terre coming back?"

Well, Terre is back; and maybe it's just that I really, really missed those shimmering three-part harmonies for all those years, but this may well be the girls' best album since the late '70s. Time has frosted Maggie's hair, but apparently left no mark on the sisters' voices. Their crystalline vocals soar above their trademark ringing guitar work (gone the electric keyboards of the '80s albums), and it's like the past three decades never happened. And there is scarcely a song here (mostly penned by Suzzy and Terre) that isn't a gem.

But while Moonswept is a very good album, it's not a perfect album. For me, the cover of the Ames Brothers' "The Naughty Lady of Shady Lane" (one of the first songs the sisters ever sang together, and a long-time staple of their live shows) is a throw-away. If they were going to pull one out of the vaults, I'd have preferred "The Clothesline Saga". And while Suzzy's daughter, Lucy has a lovely voice, and her song ("Long Before") is a pretty one, this isn't her album and I could have done without this number.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Gavin B. on June 8, 2007
Format: Audio CD
From the opening verse of "Us Little Kids" there is no doubt the sisters Roche have returned in fine form. Despite a long sabbatical in which each of the individual sister pursued musical projects that didn't quite add up the sum of their work together, we now have the real thing. All three Roche sisters who stoop to conquer with their resplendent choir girl harmonies and all of their endearing quirkiness.

The Roches were always the delightfully out sync with the prevailing musical zeitgeist. In the late Seventies when New York was a crossroads of punk rock, funk, garage band retro, and musical experiments that fused multimedia performance art with electronic music, the Roches won our hearts with their crystalline harmonies and the tongue in cheek sassy feminism of songs like "The Married Man" and "Pretty and High."

In hindsight it's hard to imagine neo-folkies like the Roches sharing the same bill at CBGB's with the Ramones, Lydia Lunch's 8 Eyed Spy, the Fleshtones or Arto Lindsey and John Lurie's edgy "fake jazz" project the Lounge Lizards. You would have had to been there in 1980 for any of it to make any sense, but the Roches managed to charm the bottle throwing slam dancing fans who went to CBGBs to see the Contortions and ended up falling under the spell of the sisters Roche. The Roche's name had enough avant-garde cachet to attract a musical icon like Robert Fripp to produce their debut album.

After a 12 year silence, long after most fans thought they ever would reunite, the Roches have returned, not with a throwaway album as an excuse for a reunion tour, but arguably the best album they've ever made.

"Moonswept" consolidates all of their musical strengths and sheds some inconsistency of their middle and late year albums.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Greg Hills on March 14, 2007
Format: Audio CD
It's so GOOD to have the Roches back, all three singing together again. Although they sound wonderful in pairs, nothing but nothing compares to the three of them...it's the stuff of goosebumps.

The standout on this recording for me, if there has to be one, is Terre, who is in very fine voice. When I first heard "September 11th..." I was amazed. When I heard it again, I cried. It is pure poetry, a perfect song from a voice at its peak. "Family of Bones," "Moonswept," "Instead I Chose," "Us Little Kids," this cd is filled to the brim with lovely and loving music.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By B. Walsh on March 30, 2007
Format: Audio CD
An essential Roches record. Easily their best effort since "Speak." Gone are the synthesizers and session players. Here the sisters shine vocally, lyrically and musically. The mark of a classic recording is the one that grows on you upon repeated playings. Moonswept does this in spades. Welcome back sisters!
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jack on June 18, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The Roches' songs have always preached the Christian gospel of love and forgiveness in a very secular guise, and Moonswept is their most beguiling and poetic recording to date. They've mostly ditched the sometimes-impenetrable quirkiness and focussed on heartfelt songs of being alive and human: Jesus Shaves is not, as the Amazon review would have it, about Jesus, but an allegory of the Christ within all of us; the unsung, unrealised heroes who simply get on with their mysterious lives as best they can (do I need to add I'm no Christian but am in awe of this sentiment?). Some of this music is so exquisite it makes me cry, particularly the eerie Family Of Bones and the regretful yet ultimately proud Instead I Chose. Overall, it's a late-period masterpiece of delicacy and purity, something only experienced artists can create. Sometimes great truths can only be heard when whispered, and the Roche sisters are masters.
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