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Moose Peterson's Guide to Wildlife Photography: Conventional and Digital Techniques (A Lark Photography Book) Paperback – November 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: A Lark Photography Book
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Lark Books; 2 edition (November 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1579904823
  • ISBN-13: 978-1579904821
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 8.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,427,747 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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See all 8 customer reviews
Many times I see technically good images but the image does not pop.
E. Bowles
From the first few chapters I have read, I like his writing style - very relaxed and pretty much a good mixture of technical/practical information.
bookeditions
Moose Peterson does a great job of addressing birds and mammals, the exclusive foci of this wildlife book.
A. Nevaldine

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Conrad J. Obregon TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 29, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is aimed at the photographer who understands the processes of taking photographs and now wants to apply these processes to taking wildlife photographs. Peterson, a famous wildlife photographer, expresses his opinions on what it takes to get good and great wildlife pictures.

The first third of the book is dedicated to explaining what equipment is necessary for taking wildlife pictures. It is clear that the author considers a camera capable of accepting a wide variety of lenses, and some really long (and expensive) lenses, essential for this purpose.

The next chapter of the book is devoted to techniques he considers necessary to make a picture "pop", i.e., attract a viewer's attention. He discusses lighting, color, exposure and backgrounds. The third section of the book talks about getting close to wildlife subjects and the fourth chapter looks at ten pictures of birds and describes the circumstances surrounding their taking, and the fifth chapter does the same with pictures of mammals.

I imagine that reading this book would be much like sitting around with Moose in a bull session and talking about wildlife photography, with all the advantages and disadvantages that might include. For a written work this book needed a good editor, not only to correct grammatical errors and typos, but also to correct all the repetitions, contradictory advice and non-sequiturs. Also, notwithstanding statements to the contrary, Peterson is clearly biased in favor of digital photography with Nikon cameras.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A. Nevaldine on August 26, 2004
Format: Paperback
Moose Peterson does a great job of addressing birds and mammals, the exclusive foci of this wildlife book. No other non-mammals, such as insects, butterflies, moths, reptiles, etc., are included.

The first part of the book details gear necessary and/or desirable for doing wildlife photography. Peterson discusses camera bodies, a wide variety of lenses, and other accessories, such as flash, tripods, and filters.

Peterson also addresses the hot topic du jour: film vs. digital imagery. He describes the advantages and disadvantages of each, and provides tips and recommendations for both conventional film camera users and digital camera users.

A heavy emphasis on exposure comprises the second part of the book. In a nontechnical way, Peterson writes about making the subject "pop"--how to give the subject life, so that it is not flat or dull. He provides many tips and ideas for accomplishing this.

Third is a section on getting close physically to the subject. Peterson advocates for the value of knowing the biology--the culture and habitat and behavior--of the animals to be photographed. In addition, he addresses the ethics involved in approaching wildlife and the treatment of living photographic subjects. He promotes taking no action that threatens the welfare of the subjects in any way, even if that means you do not capture the image. I appreciate his value for the life of wildlife.

The final two chapters in the books consist of stories about Peterson photographing birds and mammals. As I read through his tales, I could imagine him telling these during a slide presentation. It is common to hear them during a slide show, but rare to read such chatty stories in a book. The inclusion of this feature of the book makes the book somewhat unique.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By E. Bowles on September 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
If for no other reason, Moose's chapter on Making the Subject Pop is reason enough to get this book. The chapter is 38 pages long with lots of examples and suggestions.

Many times I see technically good images but the image does not pop. Then you look at images from successful wildlife photographers like Moose Peterson and many others. Their images have a special quality that makes the subject jump. And in many cases, the extra pop can be achieved through editing or a little more time for composition.

I've read this one chapter many times, and it is an important topic not covered by other authors. And the proof is in the result - an image with a small but important edit to make it "Pop" was selected as a winner for a calendar shot among more than 1000 other entries.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Randy Schmoll on April 11, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book should have been in my library years ago. I actually feel cheated that I had not found it sooner. Moose gives some great tips for the nature photographer and I now consider this a must have for your ongoing education. The subjects of lighting are worth the cost of the book itself. I also have moose Peterson's "Capture" and worried that these two books would duplicate information, and while there is a slight amount of that, such as his personal equipment selection, but certainly enough new information to warrant their individual purchase.

"Capture" is more of Moose's philosophy on photography and life and his journey thru both while "The Guide ..." has a more technical quality about it.
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