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Moose's Big Idea (Moose and Hildy Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 35 customer reviews

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Length: 64 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Age Level: 6 - 8 Grade Level: 1st - 3rd

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-3–Greene departs from the popular, reality-based Owen Foote series (Houghton) to offer lots of laughs in this easy chapter book. Moose is sad upon losing his very large antlers, but cheers up a bit when his pig friend, Hildy, is now able to observe his pretty eyes and muscular legs, and notes the troubles his antlers brought. In the next chapter, he stays inside during hunting season, spending his time reading, doing puzzles, and drawing impressive pictures, modestly telling the less-talented Hildy that ‘There's no good or bad in art…just different styles.' When cabin fever ensues, Moose gets the idea to sell doughnuts, coffee, and original artwork to hunters, hoping they won't recognize him in a blue hat and white apron, making a sale to a naive hunter. In another chapter, this same man finds Moose's old antlers but won't give them back. Finally, Moose's new antlers begin to grow. Fans of Cynthia Rylant's Poppleton (Scholastic) and other readers stepping up to chapter books will laughingly turn these pages and clamor for more. Mathieu's frequent black-and-white illustrations expand on the fun.–Laura Scott, Farmington Community Library, MI
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Author Stephanie Greene also wrote Moose and Hildy: Moose’s Big Idea. In addition, she is the author of the popular Owen Foote chapter-book series. She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Illustrator Joe Mathieu is the illustrator of many popular picture books, including We're Going on a Lion Hunt, Mrs. Millie Goes to Philly!, and Pick a Pumpkin, Mrs. Millie!. He lives in Hudson, Massachusetts.

Product Details

  • File Size: 3902 KB
  • Print Length: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Two Lions (November 6, 2012)
  • Publication Date: November 6, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008RDG4RK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #111,544 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
"Even for a moose, Moose was funny looking. His eyes were as tiny as marbles. His nose looked like a huge baked potato. His knees knocked. But nobody noticed how funny looking Moose was. And all because of his antlers."

So begins this witty and original 53-page chapter book about a moose coping with his dropped antlers. Panicked, he calls his mom, who reassures him that they'll grow back, bigger and stronger than ever. Still, young Moose doesn't feel Moose-ish anymore. Furthermore, it's now hunting season, and Moose must stay inside. Only his art, his doughnut baking and his friend Hildy (an optimistic pig with a big heart and a ready laugh) keep Moose's boredom at bay.

Contrary to author Greene's premise that Moose must stay indoors, Moose takes his doughnuts and paintings to the forest. Here, he meets a blue-collar hunter so bad at hunting that he figures all the moose "were lying on the beach somewhere, sipping fancy drinks and eating tortilla chips." Moose cleverly disguises his Moose-hood, ("Say aren't you a moose?..." "Have you ever heard of a moose who cooks?") and the two have doughnuts. Moose even sells him some paintings, and he tells the hunter/failed artist, "There's no such thing as good or bad in art"..."there's just different styles." The absent-minded hunter has two more encounters with moose, not realizing that each time he's seeing Moose, and each time, Moose helps the somewhat ill suited outdoorsman. The hunter is impressed: "Take it from me... There's no good or bad with moose; there are just different styles."

Greene is a clever writer, and the dialogue between Moose and hunter is very funny. She's also very imaginative in her portrayal of the doughnut making, painting, rowing, checkers-playing, and slightly vain moose.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was bothered, at the beginning of Moose's Big Idea, by the words, "To a moose, having big antlers is as important as it is for a man to have big muscles. Everyone respects you. Everyone wants to be your friend." Only then, when it turned out that Moose was quite all right without his antlers, I realized that the book, by extension, had the same thing to say about the necessity for humans to look a certain way. Tricky, tricky.
These subtle slants happen throughout the book as characters don't recognize each other, word things carefully so they completely change the subject without lying, etc. This kind of sneaky humor may be lost on some kids, but I think those kids will still be able to get something out of the basic story--that a lost tooth or a bad haircut isn't a huge tragedy, for instance, or that real friends might like someone even better for what seems like a fault to that person.
A pretty good book, and Moose makes admirable use of hatching and crosshatching in his drawings.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I'm so glad that my family has finally discovered these books!

When Moose's antlers fall off, he doesn't know what he's going to do. He's nothing without his antlers. He calls his momma for comfort, but only ends up feeling worse. His best friend, Hildy, is actually glad to hear the news. Those antlers were always knocking things around! Moose's dilemma eventually leads him to the woods where he meets a "not so bright" moose hunter.

This is the 1st book in the Moose and Hildy series. There's 4 of them now, and as much as we enjoyed this one, they keep getting better and better as you go along!

I read this story with my 5 year old, and he loved it just as much as me. It's just a simple, sweet, humorous story about a moose and his piggy friend. (Hildy isn't the main focus of this story, or the next one, but she does get a great deal more focus in the last two books, which we liked.)

There's grey/white pictures throughout the book, which is the perfect addition to the story!

We greatly enjoyed our time in this book, and give the whole series a highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Moose loves having majestic antlers that stretch for five feet from side to side. Unfortunately, he has no idea that they'll fall off every Fall. When they do, he's completely embarrassed and devastated, and doesn't want anyone (except his mom, who explains things to him) to know about it. His friend Hildy is understanding and sweet, though, and when she finds out, she tries to help him feel the best he can about himself.

But it's Moose's run-ins with a hunter (who he thinks is multiple hunters) that eventually help him treasure his uniqueness. In the funniest instance, Moose ends up selling the hunter, during hunting season, doughnuts and artwork.

The story was a bit short, but it was a good set up for the series and how each of the main characters acts and behaves (Moose is my favorite). The illustrations are really cute--especially of Moose, capturing the awkwardness he feels after losing his beloved antlers.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I enjoy the Moose and Hildy stories. They are fun to read to children of all ages. The humor is clever and cute without being over-the-top. The theme here is acceptance of diversity. Moose looses his antlers one fall day and he feels unmoose-like without his big antlers. The bigger the antlers, the better it is for a moose, which Stephanie Greene likes to a man with big muscles. But Moose's friend Hildy seems happy that Moose's big rack is gone for a while as that means he can come over for a visit without knocking things off the walls and shelves.

I was a little confused about the purpose of the hunter whom Moose meets several times in the story. What was the purpose behind that? Regardless, the dialogue is quirky and smart, the tone is upbeat, and it's a cute story to read to children and then discuss afterwards. Diversity and acceptance are always good messages to spread.
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