Qty:1
  • List Price: $79.95
  • Save: $11.66 (15%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Morality and the Good Life Paperback – January 2, 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$68.29
$18.99 $0.19

Frequently Bought Together

Morality and the Good Life + Moral Relativism: A Reader
Price for both: $115.74

Buy the selected items together
  • Moral Relativism: A Reader $47.45

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (January 2, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195105389
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195105384
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.5 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,795,181 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An excellent selection of essays on the most important topics of ethics and ethical theories..."--Ivan Boh, Ohio State University

"A wonderful selection of some of the great articles and short pieces on ethics."--William E. Hannaford, Jr., Champlain College

"This valuable reader is clearly organized, providing students with a comprehensive framework as well as comprehensible introductions to the discipline in general and individual moral philosophers in particular. The work is equally valuable as a primary text, supplemental reader, and/or reference source."--Harold Warlick, High Point University

"Excellent and accessible work. Introduction and summaries of articles quite lucid. Comprehensive in range and outlook. A positive contribution."--Ramesh Patel, Antioch College

About the Author

Paul K. Moser is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University Chicago. His most recent books include The Severity of God: Religion and Philosophy Reconceived (Cambridge University Press, 2013); The Elusive God: Reorienting Religious Epistemology (Cambridge University Press, 2009); and The Evidence for God: Religious Knowledge Reexamined (Cambridge University Press, 2010). He is editor of Jesus and Philosophy: New Essays (Cambridge University Press, 2009), and co-editor of Divine Hiddenness (Cambridge University Press, 2002) and of The Wisdom of the Christian Faith (Cambridge University Press, 2012). Moser is the past Editor of the American Philosophical Quarterly.

More About the Author

Paul K. Moser is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University Chicago and the past Editor of the American Philosophical Quarterly. His latest book is The Severity of God: Religion & Philosophy Reconceived (Cambridge University Press, 2013). He is also the author of The Evidence for God (Cambridge University Press, 2010). This book is a sequel to his book, The Elusive God (Cambridge University Press, 2008), which won the 2011 Alpha Sigma Nu Book Award for Philosophy. His co-edited collection The Wisdom of the Christian Faith was published by Cambridge University Press in 2012, and his edited collection Jesus and Philosophy was published by Cambridge University Press in 2009. He is also Co-Editor of the new Cambridge University Press book series, Cambridge Studies in Religion, Philosophy, and Society. His current book in progress is The Presence of God: Power and Experience in Religion.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By ctdreyer on May 16, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is an interesting anthology, and a useful one. Many of the papers (or book excerpts) included here have been extremely influential; nearly all them are interesting and stimulating; and they're all worthy of serious study. So this is an anthology that is worth having--though I'm not sure it's worth the full retail price.
The book is divided into six sections, each on a distinct topic. The first topic is the nature of moral goodness (and, in particular, of the language we use to talk about moral goodness), and it includes both cognitivist and noncognitivist accounts. Indeed, the section centers around the debate between cognitivists and noncognitivists. And the selections included are all from heavy hitters: Moore, Firth, Ross, and Foot defend cognitivism (Foot and Ross by criticizing the forms of noncognitivism on display here), while Ayer, Hare, and Gibbard defend noncognitivism. The second topic is theories about what constitutes a good human life, and it includes readings on the three major views here--hedonism, desire-satisfaction theories, and objectivism. The topic of the third section is virtue ethics, and it includes classic work by Anscombe, Foot, and MacIntyre. The fourth is moral realism vs. moral anti-realism. This section begins with J. L. Mackie's classic defense of an error-theoretic account of morality, and it includes a non-naturalist realist response from John McDowell and a noncognitivist response from Simon Blackburn. It ends with Nicholas Sturgeon's defense of a naturalist form of realism in his "Moral Explanations," though, for whatever reason, the editors didn't include the work of Gilbert Harman's to which Sturgeon is explicitly responding in this paper.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By morgan on January 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a very good text for an advanced ethics class. I used it at the undergraduate level and was very challenged. The reading can be difficult, but after navigation through the terminology and jargon, useful life skills may be aquired.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?