Customer Reviews


77 Reviews
5 star:
 (38)
4 star:
 (25)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (6)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars didn't want it to end
This book is laugh-out-loud-sitting-on-the-couch-on-your-own funny. It is a collection of her favourite newspaper columns that she written over the years, about British TV shows, Celebrities, Politics or everyday married life, with short introductions giving the context or some background information. The Gaga interview is a stand-out, but my favourites were the...
Published on October 14, 2012 by Kathryn

versus
22 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One way to get behind The Times' paywall ..
First the good news. Caitlin Moran's journalism has for some time been largely hidden from view unless you buy The Times. Now here are many of her articles available to us all - really, a lot of them - it's a big fat book. And if you like her writing, you'll like this. She is genuinely funny and seldom dull.

I bought How To Be a Woman, but I didn't buy this. I...
Published on November 6, 2012 by blacktaffeta


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars didn't want it to end, October 14, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
This book is laugh-out-loud-sitting-on-the-couch-on-your-own funny. It is a collection of her favourite newspaper columns that she written over the years, about British TV shows, Celebrities, Politics or everyday married life, with short introductions giving the context or some background information. The Gaga interview is a stand-out, but my favourites were the late-night conversations with her husband. Caitlin Moran is hilarious and an extremely talented writer.

I really want to be best friends with Caitlin... I've been raving about "How to be a Woman" for the past year, and this was just as good again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One way to get behind The Times' paywall .., November 6, 2012
This review is from: Moranthology (Paperback)
First the good news. Caitlin Moran's journalism has for some time been largely hidden from view unless you buy The Times. Now here are many of her articles available to us all - really, a lot of them - it's a big fat book. And if you like her writing, you'll like this. She is genuinely funny and seldom dull.

I bought How To Be a Woman, but I didn't buy this. I borrowed it from the library. For two reasons.

1. She is, theoretically at least, passionately pro-libraries so I imagine she should be all in favour of that.
2. I read somewhere that every time she sees someone with a copy of her book, she says "Kerching" under her breath. And that's not very nice, is it?

So this brings me to the bad news. Underneath all the brilliance and the determination to entertain, I sense something rather like contempt for her readership, a grasping attitude to money, and an ego the size of a planet. When I saw her speak last year she was hung over. All those people had paid to see her and she couldn't stay sober the night before. There's something uncomfortable about the way she writes about her children - about her attitude to her husband - about her massive self-belief (please don't write about world economics again, Caitlin. You have no understanding of economics. It makes you look stupid as well as arrogant and I'm sure you don't want that).

Also, the later articles are not as well-written as the earlier ones. Churning out all those words every week seems to be taking its toll and it's clear she's ready to move on from journalism.

Therefore, three stars. Read the book fast, revel in her facility with language, enjoy her interviews with the cream of the entertainment world. Just don't look too deep beneath the surface, because you might not like what you find.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love Caitlin Moran's writing, December 12, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
Good Read. Very funny. Caitlin is great. Have read How to Be a Woman too. I recommend both books. :)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A mildly entertaining anthology!, January 20, 2013
By 
After her tremendously successful book How To Be a Woman, Caitlin Moran is back with a collection of columns she's written for The Times Magazine in her appropriately named anthology Moranthology.
Wading through a mishmash of different topics, mostly in the realms of popular culture, she also broaches more serious topics, such as living on benefits, or, my personal favorites, allows up-close-and-personal insights into her life, including how she got her trademark grey hair strand. Topics may vary, some columns being more poignant than others, ranging from grave to funny, and always with a tendency of bordering on the vulgar, Moran's witty and eloquent writing style is definitely the red thread in this book.
Little did I know this is a collection of older work and the only new additions are the short introductions to each column. Of course this presented the perfect opportunity to simply get to know her work better. Unfortunately though this book shares the fate of many anthologies - the likelihood that you will end up loving a handful of articles while the rest is just average padding between the covers, a padding that, in my case, consisted of an abundance of pieces about British TV series.
Seeing how my expectations were high after her previous book, this collection was admittedly a bit of a let-down for me. However, this is simply a matter of personal preferences and should not discourage anyone giving this book a try.
In short: A mildly entertaining anthology in typical Moran-style!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Random House. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Almost perfectly smart, funny, and engaging, March 24, 2013
By 
Ready Mommy (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Moranthology (Paperback)
For those of us who are new to the phenomenon that is Caitlin Moran, this compilation of columns proves that she is an unparalleled artist, painting with a brush of words and a palette of intelligence, hilarity, conscience, introspection, and interpersonality. In other words, her writing is wicked smart, uber perceptive, totally principled, and super freaking funny.

Only two problems separate "Moranthology" from "How To Be a Woman," an irrefutably five-star book: (1) the nature of an anthology and (2) haste. First, reading this book is a bit like watching a full season of "West Wing" in a week or multiple episodes of "30 Rock" in a single sitting - one is simultaneously overwhelmed by the brilliance and unable to fully appreciate it. If I had it to do again (without the library due date bearing down on me), I'd read one piece a day. As it was, I had trouble switching gears between columns and ended with an impression of slight unevenness in quality. Second, the damned typos. Clearly in a rush to capitalize on the success of "How To Be a Woman" in the States, Moran's publisher appears to have either hired a high school student to re-type the columns and run straight to the printer, or forgotten to insert a caveat explaining that original errors were maintained for some strange sense of journalistic integrity (and I'm not an idiot who doesn't recognize British spelling variations; I'm just a whack job who's pet-peeved by the lack of thorough editing).

If I could give a book four and a half stars, I would. Blame "How To Be a Woman" for my refusal to call "Moranthology" perfection, then read both books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars loads of laughs, July 9, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
A lot of this book is quite contextual as the articles are on TV shows and such so if you haven't seen them, they're only mildly interesting. I really loved the in bed with husband sketches.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quick and Funny, April 24, 2013
By 
This review is from: Moranthology (Paperback)
Caitlin Moran is an English funnywoman who, thanks to her first book, "How to Be a Woman", is now starting to make a name here in the United States. In "Moranthology", she presents a collection of past essays about everything from feminism to the BBC series "Sherlock" to the Royal Wedding. In it, she details her writing career, her relationship with her husband, and the various celebrities she's had the chance to interview (including Lady Gaga and Paul McCartney).

Moran is a unique blend of irreverence and intelligence, and, in some cases, she manages to type what we're all thinking. Though I fundamentally differ from her beliefs certain matters, I can admit that she makes things funny. Some chapters are a bit strained (her chapter on being poor and having the television taken away isn't necessarily in the best taste, even if it is true) but others are downright hilarious. In fact, her re-telling of the Royal Wedding is worth the entire book.

Along with her columns, Moran introduces most essays with a brief history of the situation or how it relates to the previous section. It's chatty and informal, and, in some cases, much funnier than the essay itself. If you're looking for the next Mindy Kaling, this isn't quite in the same vein, though fans of the former will probably like this one. As for me, it was a nice, quick read, and I wouldn't rule out reading more of Moran in the future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This book is a mess; typos and spelling errors are distracting, March 19, 2014
By 
yetanotherstephanie (somewhere in the middle) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
I enjoyed reading "How to Be a Woman" and wanted to read more of Moran's work. "Moranthology" turned out to be just that: an anthology of her previously-published columns, without much concern over whether they translate well into a book-length format or not. She starts strong--I loved her story of trying to break into journalism at age 15 by getting lost in London and bringing a cake in a suitcase to an interview--but even then it feels like something is missing. (E.g. Where were her parents??!? Her mother never appears, but she was home-schooled...??) There's no real backstory to explain how she went from writing for an indie-type local music mag at 17 to landing exclusives with Lady Gaga, for instance.
•Observations about pop culture: Her interviews with prominent musicians are interesting, but they were published years ago, so they're not timely, and don't really include any new information. She includes reviews of TV shows that were 5 years out-of-date even when this book was published in 2012. I was thrown by her drooling over the sexiness of the "newest Doctor Who"; turned out she was talking about David Tennant, though Matt Smith had held the role for nearly four years by 2012. The TV reviews might have held my interest if they were original, but one of them was literally a scene-by-scene recap of an episode of ""Sherlock."
•Her recap of the Royal Wedding was cute, but you'd have to be a die-hard anglophile to recognize any of the British D-list celebrities she quotes. (Twitter feeds from some guy who was married to a girl who did not win on some back-season of UK Big Brother, for example.) It took me awhile to read several of the articles because I was forever Googling most of the names she drops.
• There are too many spelling errors and typos in this book for an author who calls herself a professional writer. (I stopped counting at 17.) This isn't a case of British English vs American English, but sloppy mistakes of the than/then, extra "a"s or "the"s variety. Some of the spelling errors are unintentionally funny. "Bare" and "bear" are rather different things. I did a double-take in the McCartney interview when she remarked on the "unmistakable sound of American tour manager balling someone out" over a laminate (Wait-- what?!--). Ahem. She meant "bawling." Bawling someone out. Though I'm sure both would have unmistakable sounds.

Overall, it wasn't a horrible book, but it wasn't the promised "hilarious" UK-style Fey-Handler-Dunham combo, either. If it's free or in the Kindle $1 section and you have Google handy, you might give it a go. But if it's full price, there are other female humorists who are much more worthy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Collection of humorous columns, November 7, 2012
This review is from: Moranthology (Paperback)
MORANTHOLOGY is, rather logically, an anthology of columns by Caitlin Moran. Moran wrote the bestselling HOW TO BE A WOMAN, but she's been well known in the U.K. for years because of her columns for The Times. This collection of her favorites covers a variety of topics, including everyone's favorite BBC shows Downton Abbey and Sherlock.

My personal favorites were her ode to libraries and her interviews with famous musicians. Moran grew up in a council house and was self taught, which gives especial force to her defense of libraries and their ability to making differences in a community and in people's lives. As for the interviews, I don't think you can go wrong talking about Keith Richards, Paul McCartney, and Lady Gaga. But Moran manages to write up the experiences in a way that feels fresh, different from the hundreds of articles written about those subjects every year.

I did mention Downton Abbey and Sherlock before, but I think I found her television columns the most tedious. She writes with a genuine passion for the shows, but I've read more interesting insights into their appeal on the internet. But most of the time Moran's voice is very appealing. She has self deprecation down cold and does a good job of owning up to the flaws she reveals in her more personal pieces. And it's simply hilarious when she admits to not actually knowing where 10 Downing Street is.

MORANTHOLOGY is a fun collection and I'm sure her American fans will enjoy the easy access to her best columns. (British fans can enjoy owning a hard copy without paying for The Times, as well.) For readers who aren't already fans, it might be best to start with HOW TO BE A WOMAN. Moran's written on such a range of subjects that MORANTHOLOGY, despite its division into four themed sections, lacks cohesion.

The pop culture obsession of MORANTHOLOGY will appeal to teen readers, as will Moran's chatty, irreverent voice. But some caution is advised if recommending this book to a younger reader as Moran uses a certain word that's pretty common in the Queen's English but extremely rude in American English. It could be a good time to bring up differences in cultural norms. Moran would probably appreciate it because she's all about the culture.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not a follow up to her first, November 20, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
I was so impressed by 'How to be a woman' that I jumped on this one. Didn't find it as relatable or funny as her first effort. I also didn't understand much of her references.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Moranthology
Moranthology by Caitlin Moran (Paperback - November 6, 2012)
$14.99 $9.48
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.