More Church Folk and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 1 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

More Church Folk Hardcover – July 28, 2010


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, July 28, 2010
$24.99
$3.77 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

More Church Folk + Church Folk + Second Sunday
Price for all three: $38.97

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
  • Church Folk $6.99
  • Second Sunday $6.99

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; 1 edition (July 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446577766
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446577762
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,030,542 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

If you crossed Eddie Murphy with the Lutherans of Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon, you'd get something very like Bowen's Gospel United Church. As another triennial conference rolls around in 1986, the characters of Church Folk are 23 years older, but not all of them are wiser. An election for church bishops promises politicking, corruption, and plenty of well-dressed people. The principal plot complication is a druglike concoction that is both addictive and aphrodisiac, giving the forces of corruption some entrepreneurial ideas. Bowen's got a good eye and a better ear, though it's a little hard to keep all the characters straight, since there's a mess of good guys, bad guys, and assorted wives, sons, and neighbors. Some conservative Christians may find it a bit too raunchy, but even some of those readers will find themselves laughing out loud at certain bits. Underneath it all are acute observations about African-American history and community. Readers who went to church with Bowen before will be delighted to return, and her choir should get bigger.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

After three ambitious and morally bankrupt bishops discover Watermelon Power 21, they enter into partnerships with criminal elements to raise enough money for a takeover of the next Triennial General Conference of the Gospel United Church in Durham, North Carolina. But WP21 is not just a potent male-enhancement supplement; it's seriously addictive and can be fatal if not taken properly. Reverend Denzelle Flowers (who's also an FBI agent) and the other decent preachers who want to end the corruption rampant throughout the church have their work cut out for them. Picking up in 1986, 23 years after the events detailed in Bowen's best-seller Church Folk (2001), this inspirational novel uses humor, local color, and vividly descriptive, if startling, language to good effect, ably demonstrating once again why Bowen is the queen of African American Christian fiction. An entertaining and timely look at the politics of religion, Bowen's latest sounds a call to action for members of all faiths. --Lynne Welch

More About the Author

Michele Andrea Bowen grew up in St. Louis, Mo. She has lived in Durham, NC for several decades, and it is her second home. She graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with an undergraduate degree in Psychology, and graduate degrees in Social Work and Counseling Education. She went on to pursue additional graduate training, and earned graduate degrees in United States History and Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Michele has an interdisciplinary professional background. She has published five novels--Church Folk, Second Sunday, Holy Ghost Corner, Up at the College, and More Church Folk--with Grand Central Publishing (NY, NY). She is an Essence Magazine Bestselling author.

She is currently working on a three-part series with her new publisher. And she recently published an independent work, a collection of short stories titled, Riding Dirty and with Jesus? with Amazon/Kindle Direct Publishing.

Michele is a mom and grandmother. She is a member of St. Joseph's AME Church in Durham, and a soloist in the Inspirational Singers Contemporary Gospel Choir at St. Joseph's. She has also signed up to work as a volunteer for the Obama 2012 Campaign in Durham.

Customer Reviews

If you thought Church Folks was funny, this one will take you to another level entirely.
thesavvybamalady
I was never upset to put the book down in between reads, and it usually took me a bit to pick it back up and continue.
Urs
With my issues aside, I really think that the plot was very original and for most of us very relatable.
Bookventures Book Club

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Urban Reviews VINE VOICE on July 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
It's been years since we've visited with our friends from Church Folks. Now twenty-two years later, the presiding Bishop's family as well as the church family of the Gospel United Church are back, and they have only learned how to turn it up a few notches. Nothing much has changed since the buffoonery continues as only church folk can. Some of the players were forced to move on, while others left on their own. The church is preparing for the Triennial General Conference, and some of the Bishops plan to add "paradise" to the agenda.

These brothers have come up with a way to buy seats at the next election so they can secure positions for the fallen sheep of their herd. Along with securing seats for men who have nothing on their minds that look like kingdom building, they also plan to sell a drug to the congregation. This import business will help the Bishops in Africa, Mozambique and Swaziland get material goods for personal use. Bishop Hemphill's family business is also part of the plan. Uncle Lee Lee has discovered a watermelon powder (WP21) that resembles a "youth serum" with a twist for men.

A synthetic drug, greed, and desperate folks make More Church Folk one interesting read. This is especially true when Rev. F.B.I agent Denzelle Flowers is assigned to investigate the Fifteenth, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth district Gospel United Church of Bishops. One problem with More Church Folk was that there were too many characters. Another problem was trying to keep tabs on their status in the line of the church roster. But what was wonderful was the fact that the author took the time to leave the reader with a reference note. I used this note many times while reading to keep the characters in order. Essence has coined Ms. Bowen the "the queen of Christian fiction" and I have to agree she is one of the best.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kharabella on January 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I shall not tell a lie: this novel was a disappointment. It wasn't the plot -- ridiculous as that might appear to some. It was the writing -- it was as if the author was in a rush and just trying to fill up pages with observations about the characters, instead of action or real character development. I have read at least two of the author's other works, so I don't think that she is a bad author. But this one should have spent a little more time on her desk before being sent to the publisher. I just hope the next one is better! We need good christian fiction!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By OOSA Online Book Club on September 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
"More Church Folk" picks up 20+ years late. This time around the bishops and pastors are looking for new ways to secure votes. The last stunt did not go over well with the members of the Triennial General Conference Community and it appears that no one has learned from past mistakes.

This book was difficult to get through. I struggled with the history of the church and the members. I understand what the author was attempting but the story line was too outrageous to be believable. I love this author and looked forward to reading the long awaited follow up of "Church Folk." Unfortunately, this was not what I expected.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Folake Taylor on February 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I was really excited when I won this book because I love Christian fiction but more often than not recently, I have been disappointed.

I have not been able to finish this book, as many months as it has been. It was very hard for me to read each time I picked it up and finally, I just let it be. I will return to it at a later date. I have read half of it and if I ever do finish it and I feel different, I will amend this review.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kaboom12 on September 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
More Church Folks is nothing like "Church Folks" or "Second Sunday". It was a serious press for me to get to page 94 as the book is slooooow, a bit overly detailed, and uninteresting; and all of this drove me to stop reading, and pass More Church Folks on to someone else to read and wait for them to tell me if the book ever picks up, becomes interesting or juicy. The book's so boring that I don't remember too much of what the 94 pages are about, which means it's not worth discussing.

Save your money. Seriously!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Loves to Read on August 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Normally, I enjoy Michele Bowen's books, however, this one was a struggle to get thru. I'm a history buff, but her historic writing was dull and long. While I did love the plot it just took me a long time to get to it. Even though I did not enjoy this particular book, Ms. Bowen is still a great writer and I look forward to her next novel.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on July 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
More Church Folks
Michele Andrea Bowen
Grand Central, Jul 28 2010, $24.99
ISBN: 9780446577762

In 1986 at the Gospel United Church, older flock members remember the two-decade plus old scandal at the Triennial General Conference (see Church Folk) as another meeting is about to convene. At this church meeting, bishops are elected to fill vacancies. Senior Bishop Percy Jennings wants good Christian males to sit in these critical seats. Bishop Jennings believes Pastors Theophilus Simmons and Eddie Tate are ideal individuals who would make super Bishops. He needs at least one of them to gain a seat if he is to clean the church of its avarice embezzlers who cannot spell Bible.

Bishop Jennings learns something nasty is occurring in Mozambique. He assigns Pastor Tate's mentee Pastor Denzelle Flowers to investigate. Denzelle's day job supervisor is elated that his ordained minister FBI agent Flowers is going to Africa to look into drug smuggling. Pastor Flowers soon discovers a scheme to sell illegal sexual enhancement drugs to Bishop Jennings' prime adversary's mentee Pastor Sonny Washington; they plan to extort the votes of those caught in an adulterous scandal.

The return to the Church Folks environs is a terrific insightful tale that once again reflects on the religious leaders being a microcosm of the larger society. Some care about the spiritual and other needs of their flock while some of the leadership care about themselves as Michele Andrea Bowen makes a strong case that just because you're a bishop or pastor does not mean you are holier than the congregation. Although the ensemble cast can be overwhelming for the reader as well as church officials, with interesting FBI intrigue enhancing the thriller, fans will relish this exciting entry as the avarice and the nurturing battle for the souls of the congregation with motives wider than the chasm between heaven and hell.

Harriet Klausner
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?