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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Original edition (April 17, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062007467
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062007469
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #357,359 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The blend of humor and sadness is realistic and gripping, and watching Frannie figure out who she is and what matters is gratifying. This will appeal to those who enjoy Jodi Picoult along with chick lit fans willing to read something a little darker. (Library Journal (starred review))

This is sharp, funny, clever and very romantic. The story, about a young woman downsizing her expectations in the wake of a tragedy, might not be new, but Palmer’s handling of it is surprisingly fresh and engaging. (Mirror (London))

The book is a well-plotted examination of domestic violence, chasing unattainable dreams and hiding one’s real self. The dialogue is sparky, the characters engaging and this is by all means a great read. (Daily Mail (London))

“Palmer’s dialogue is reliably natural and funny, and her insights into the way women betray their true selves in search of acceptance are keen and honest.” (Publishers Weekly)

“Palmer takes what could be a standard chick-lit story about finding oneself and adds emotional depth through this shockingly violent act. While Palmer’s characters find happiness and closure by the final page, readers will ponder this surprising story for a good, long time.” (Booklist)

“Palmer brings wit and wisdom to her tale of love, damage and self-acceptance” (Kirkus Reviews)

From the Back Cover

What really goes on behind those perfect white picket fences?

In Frances’s mind, beautiful, successful, ecstatically married Emma Dunham is the height of female perfection. Frances, recently dumped with spectacular drama by her boyfriend, aspires to be just like Emma. So do her close friends and fellow teachers, Lisa and Jill. But Lisa’s too career-focused to find time for a family. And Jill’s recent unexpected pregnancy could have devastating consequences for her less-than-perfect marriage.

Yet sometimes the golden dream you fervently wish for turns out to be not at all what it seems—like Emma’s enviable suburban postcard life, which is about to be brutally cut short by a perfect husband turned killer. And in the shocking aftermath, three devastated friends are going to have to come to terms with their own secrets . . . and somehow learn to move forward after their dream is exposed as a lie.


More About the Author

Liza Palmer is the internationally bestselling author of Conversations with the Fat Girl which Booklist says, "...manages to infuse a message of self--acceptance that isn't heavy-handed or cloying. This quick-witted author is sure to develop a following." Conversations with the Fat Girl became an international bestseller its first week in publication, being named a Target Breakout book, as well as hitting Number 1 on the Fiction Heatseekers List in the UK the week before the book debuted.

Conversations with the Fat Girl has been optioned for series by HBO by the producers of Rome, Band of Brothers and Generation Kill.

Palmer's second novel is Seeing Me Naked, which Publisher's Weekly says, "consider it haute chick lit; Palmer's prose is sharp, her characters are solid and her narrative is laced with moments of graceful sentiment."

Palmer's third novel, A Field Guide to Burying Your Parents will be published in January 2010.

Palmer currently lives in Los Angeles and is hard at work on her next novel as well as several film and television projects.

Customer Reviews

The violence came out of nowhere and was handled very poorly.
J. O'Connor
Way too much time was spent trying to make sense of Emma's life.
Jahn Jones
The characters are quirky, loveable, and more important- real.
Amonk

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By AMB on April 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
Look at the cover of More Like Her...three friends, legs crossed, high heels. Total chick-lit. Summary? Girl loses boy, gets new boss, girl meets other boy. Total chick-lit. I read one novel by Liza Palmer before this one, Conversations with a Fat Girl. Great book. Great writer. Total chick-lit. What's my point? Oh, Liza Palmer pulled a fast one on us.

This starts as a classic novel about a few girlfriends and failed romance and turns into one of the best contemporary works of fiction I have read in a while. This novel is anything but typical. Ms. Palmer took a boy meets girl story and laced it with shock and tragedy. I knew from the summary there would be death. What I didn't know was how it would come to fruition. It wasn't what I expected. I was as stunned to experience it as the characters in the novel. It caught me off guard, I was genuinely shocked. I love that in a novel.

Frannie, our protagonist, shares her story with us in a voice that is refreshing and honest. A key plot point is her breakup with the perfect Ryan and subsequent blooming romance with architect Sam. This has the perfect funny debacles of romance characteristic of chick-lit. Frannie thinks too much, at times analyzing things to an exasperating level. She relies on her friends for guidance and support, and they give both with wisdom and with comedy. I was especially drawn to Jill, she reminded me of my BFF Roe. Ms. Palmer gives the reader multi-faceted characters. There was more to Frannie than her love life. And it's this other part of her that gets tested, what shines in the face of this disaster. One would think romance and tragedy couldn't coexist in the same story, but they do. And that's the beauty of More Like Her, Ms. Palmer weaves them together organically.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Obsidian Blue VINE VOICE on June 13, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have been a fan of Liza Palmer since "Conversations with the Fat Girl" and "Seeing Me Naked," however, her latest "More Like Her" left a lot to be desired at least in my opinion.

When I read the book synopsis it seemed like this would be a novel of three women who were best friends who witnessed a horrific incident involving a woman that all three of them envied. The incident ends up causing them to be more truthful with themselves and others and to tell secrets that they have been keeping hidden. It sounded good to me so I promptly bought it. What follows is a less than interesting read.

The main focus of this novel is on Frances, a teacher in a private school where she is dealing with her boyfriend of several years breaking up with her for another woman. I felt badly for Frances at first but she keeps going on and on about her ex and than going on and on about another man she meets that she has a crush on. I think you will find that Frances has awful self esteem and is constantly being told how great she is (frankly I would find it annoying to constantly reassure her but that's just me) by her best friend Jill. I guess in the end we are supposed to see how much Frances has changed but I didn't get that feeling from her at all.

Jill is fellow teacher at the school and Lisa is a new teacher who Frances and Jill are becoming acquainted with. Jill is written as a perfect wife who constantly pushes at Frances to give another guy a try in order to get over her ex. Lisa is definitely a no holds barred blunt woman. The new headmistress at their school is Emma Dunham who from the beginning of the novel you realize does not seem to have a perfect marriage since her husband seems extremely off. Emma though is supposed to be the woman that all three women envy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Luanne Ollivier TOP 500 REVIEWER on April 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
I reviewed Liza Palmer's previous book A Field Guide to Burying Your Parents a few years ago and really enjoyed it.

From the cover, I was expecting a 'chick lit' type of read, but the opening prologue is a 911 call detailing a shooting at the Markham School. We then meet Frannie in the opening chapter. She's a teacher at the Markham School. She's also just come through a nasty breakup with her boyfriend, also a teacher at the school. We're introduced to Jill and Lisa, Frannie's sidekicks. Palmer provides lots of light hearted banter and situations to open the novel. But underneath it all is Frannie's desire to be what's she's not, to have what she doesn't. Just like Emma, the new director of the school, who seems to have it all. Frannie laments..."I'm not the girl men choose."But it turns out that Emma's life is not all that perfect.

Palmer explores lots of areas in More Like Her - bullying, domestic abuse, marriage and self searching. As Frannie puts it - the search for the Real Me.

I enjoyed the interaction between the main characters (although I thought Lisa became a 'bestie' awfully quick) Funnily enough, the character I enjoyed the most was Sam - the object of Frannie's desire. I found Frannie to be a bit exhausting. You might know her - she's the one who has to slice, dice and dissect every last situation and detail, wringing nuance from inflections, tones and glances and discussing them over and over again. I enjoyed Frannie's introspective look at finding her real self, but found myself growing tired of the repetition. I wish there had been more focus on Emma and her situation.

Those looking for a traditional chick lit book won't find it here. But, those looking for a contemporary women's fiction read that explores the green grass on the other side of fence will.
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