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More Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (Scary Stories Scary Stories) Library Binding – August 21, 2001


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Series: Scary Stories Scary Stories
  • Library Binding: 112 pages
  • Publisher: HarperColl (August 21, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0397320825
  • ISBN-13: 978-0397320820
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,069,522 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Guaranteed to make your teeth chatter and your spinetingle." -- -- School Library Journal --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Alvin Schwartz is known for his more than two dozen books of folklore for young readers that explore everything from wordplay and humor to tales and legends of all kinds. Don't miss his other Scary Stories collections, including More Scary Stories To Tell in the Dark and Scary Stories 3.



Stephen Gammell's drawings have appeared in a number of books for children, including Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories to tell in the Dark, More Scary Stories To Tell in The Dark, and Scary Stories 3. He is the winner of the Caldecott Medal for his drawings in Song and Dance Man by Karen Ackerman, and his art in Where the Buffaloes Begin by Olaf Baker earned him a Caldecott Honor award, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, and a New York Times Best Illustrated Books award. Other recent books he has illustrated include Will's Mammoth by Rafe Martin, andDancing Teepees: Poems of American Indian Youth by Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve.

Mr. Gammell lives with his wife in St. Paul, Minnesota.


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Customer Reviews

Brett Helquist is not a bad artist.
Amanda Pike
Yeah I really enjoyed reading this and I recommended this to kids who like this kind of stuff.
Eva P. Urrabazo
That is until one of my students checked this book out of the library.
Teacher Jeannie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By SB on October 5, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a revised edition of a book that was part of a series so famously gruesome that it was the most frequently challenged book of the nineties. This was not because of the stories themselves, which are mostly retellings of pretty well known urban legends and ghost stories, but because of the ORIGINAL artwork by Stephen Gammell.

Those illustrations are so lurid, frightening, and demented that several of them frighten me to this day, as an adult.

Helquist is a talented artist to be sure, but don't make the mistake of purchasing this new edition of More Scary Stories if you are truly looking to be scared: invest in an older copy: You won't regret it. (Unless of course you are buying it for a small child or nightmare-prone preteen, in which case I would NOT recommend the older editions.)
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Teacher Jeannie on July 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
Kindergarten and first-grade students love story time. However, this summer I am teaching children who have completed third grade. They have that "I'm too cool to have a story read to me" attitude. That is until one of my students checked this book out of the library. Every day they would beg me to read stories from the book -- and not just one, but two, three or four. They would grab their chairs and circle as close as they could to me. One of the students would always run and turn out the lights to help with the atmosphere. Using different voices, many pauses and the build up of suspense, I was able to scare the living bejeebeez out of them many times. They loved it! Thank you for giving me a book that's "cool" for third/fourth grade story time! I would highly recommend it to teachers of grades 3-6.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Margaret E. Chapp on October 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover
PLEASE READ!

This collection of folklore is absolutely wonderful. Alvin Schwartz writes in a style that is both easy to read and has a lasting effect that tells the story in a unique way for readers of all ages.

But...

I am VERY disappointed in the artwork. I have the original copies that were printed in the early 90's with illustrations by Steven Gammell. If you wish to see a some examples of his works, here are some links:

[...]

[...]

[...]

http://www.amazon.com/Scary-Stories-Tales-Chill-Bones/dp/0060217944/ref=sr_1_8?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1286345351&sr=1-8

I'm not knocking Brett Helquist; his style is well suited for "Series of Unfortunate Events" but not Alvin Schwartz' "Scary Stories" collection. Some reviewers wrote that this collection was not scary at all; I beg to differ....

The reason the stories are scary is because of the ART! There's the overused saying, "A picture is worth a thousand words" ... that sums up Steven Gammell. I first read these books in third grade and they stuck with me ever since, simply because of the terribly gruesome and disturbing imagery. The stories by themselves are uninteresting and honestly, Brett Helquist's illustrations do not give this book series justice whatsoever!!

I also realize that the older copies that have Steven Gammell's illustrations are hard to find here on Amazon. This saddens me... If you happen to find the originals, PLEASE buy them. You won't regret it.

See for yourself. You make the judgement call.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By William Mistretta on October 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Alvin Schwartz's stories always played second fiddle to Stephen Gammell's art. Without it, this book is not worth anyone's time or money. Avoid it and seek the originals.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Imareader on January 25, 2013
Format: Paperback
The students at my school absolutely LOVE this book! It's one of the most popular ghost story books in my library collection. I've ordered the newest version as well, but for some reason the students still check out the older, beat up copy more. I'm keeping this book as long as it holds together.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By James Duncan Rhine on January 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
These three books meant the world to me growing up, and a lot of my creative imagination I owe to these three books. I recently went to purchase these and was shocked at the whitewashing of these 30 some-odd year old books' art. What made the originals so unique was the absolutely masterful art that went with the stories. What a shame. Shame on the publisher and shame on the increasingly paranoid society that thinks that anything legitimately scary or unnerving should be locked away somewhere, never to see the light of day.

Find the originals. One tattered page of the originals is better than the whole series of this spineless crap.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
I'm the kind of person who loves to read, and if it is not fantasy, it is folklore. But i don't really like one scary story, I like a collection of stories. Animorphs were not my cup of tea, and I hated Goosebumps. But in the fourth grade, it all changed.

When I was in fourth grade, a kid in my class showed me these books and instantly, I was hooked! Now at 12, I appreciate them more when I was 11. I own all three books(if only the duo would have another one) But the second book obviously has the best bunch. My favorite stories in this book are Oh Susannah!, The Wreck, Wonderful sausage, One Sunday Morning,The Bride, Clinkity-Clink, The Drum, and many others! The author even tries to make it fun by adding some funny stories. I also reccomend the tapes-I got the first one on tape at the library and it's a blast! I think all ages could read it. It has no inappropriate dialoug, but if you have young children, I wouldn't reccomend this books, because the illustrations can be frightning(especially Oh Susannah, and the Bride,)( shudder)But if you have kids 10 and over, these are your answers to a great series and starters for the horror genre. Buy them! you won't be sorry!
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More About the Author

Alvin Schwartz is known for a body of work of more than two dozen books of folklore for young readers that explore everything from wordplay and humor to tales and legends of all kinds. His collections of scary stories -- Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark, More Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark, Scary Stories 3, and two I Can Read Books, In A Dark, Dark Room and Ghosts! -- are just one part of his matchless folklore collection.