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More Tales of the City Paperback – May 29, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial (May 29, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060929383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060929381
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,968 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An extended love letter to a magical San Francisco." -- --New York Times Book Review

"Sparkling entertainments...lit by a glowing humanity that brings each character to vivid, poignant life." -- --Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Armistead Maupin is the author of the nine-volume Tales of the City series, which includes Tales of the City, More Tales of the City, Further Tales of the City, Babycakes, Significant Others, Sure of You, Michael Tolliver Lives, Mary Ann in Autumn, and now The Days of Anna Madrigal. Maupin's other novels include Maybe the Moon and The Night Listener. Maupin was the 2012 recipient of the Lambda Literary Foundation's Pioneer Award. He lives in San Francisco with his husband, the photographer Christopher Turner.


More About the Author

Armistead Maupin was born in Washington, D.C., in 1944 but grew up in Raleigh, North Carolina. A graduate of the University of North Carolina, he served as a naval officer in the Mediterranean and with the River Patrol Force in Vietnam. Maupin worked briefly as a reporter for a newspaper in Charleston, South Carolina, before being assigned to the San Francisco bureau of the Associated Press in 1971. The climate of freedom and tolerance he found in his adopted city inspired him to come out publicly as homosexual in 1974. Two years later, he launched his "Tales of the City" serial in the San Francisco Chronicle, the first fiction to appear in an American daily for decades.

Maupin is the author of nine novels, including the six-volume Tales of the City series, Maybe the Moon, The Night Listener and, most recently, Michael Tolliver Lives. Three miniseries starring Olympia Dukakis and Laura Linney were made from the first three novels in the Tales series. The Night Listener became a feature film starring Robin Williams and Toni Collette.

He lives in Santa Fe with his husband, the photographer Christopher Turner.

Customer Reviews

Great characters and witty dialogue.
LINDA CLAYTON
After getting my kindle for Christmas I decided to read the books.
ScottNWDW
I can't wait to read what will happen next!
Nicholas Carroll

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Megami on November 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
Why is it that we admirers of the Tales of the City series enjoy it so much? Part of it is the fact that it is a combination of gossip and a good television series, all in a neat little package. Part of it is Maupin's great writing, which manages to capture the action and the spirit in a friendly, admiring style. Part of it is the motley crew of characters. But I think that the largest factor is jealousy - you read these stories and wish that you could live at Barbary Lane, and spend afternoons talking to Mrs. Madrigal, or tossing about campy bon mots with Michael.
This book is number two in a six part series about a house on Barbary Lane in San Francisco in the late 1970s and its inhabitants. Gay and straight, messed up and on the right track, Maupin's book is based on a regular (fictional) newspaper column that he wrote. And the book feels like you are getting regular episodes in the life of a group of people that you don't know personally, but you are interested in their lives anyway. You care about Mary Ann and her quest to the answer to her amnesiac lover's past. You want things to work out between Michael and the gynecologist Jon. You identify with Mona's surprise when she discovers her past during a chance visit to a desert whorehouse. You hope everything works out for DeDe and her twins-to-be. And as fantastic as these themes sound, they all become reasonable in Maupin's book. (Okay, so the parts concerning the amnesiac were a little bit far fetched, but nothing a reader can't cope with). I can almost guarantee that if you have not previously read the Tales of the City series before you read this book, you will be searching the shelves for the rest when you are finished.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Doc Kinne on June 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
With Book Two - More Tales of the City - the gloves start to come off! "Tales of the City" told us a story and introduced us to our characters. Now things really start to happen to them in "More Tales." They're put under pressure. They betray one another. They're there for one another. They find love. They lose love. They live. They die.
"More Tales" is slices of life at its near best. While, in some cases, this starts to give the book more of a "soap-opera" character (something that, to be fair, the series IS), because of the introduction and story in "Tales" you largely care about what will happen next.
Again, "More Tales" is written as social and historical commentary (whether Maupin meant it that way or not) and now the books have an even more interesting nostalgic twinge to them as you can compare your thoughts and your actions to events the characters are going through that you remember from your own life even if you've never been to San Francisco.
Maupin has a way with dialog and characters somehow. While there are times when his PLOT is contrived and fantastical, how his characters get through it always seems to be rather on the mark.
Finally, no review of this work is complete without mentioning the chapter "Letter to Mama." This one chapter - two pages - is worth the price of the entire book and I personally know two families whom that chapter has helped "pave the way." It is required reading for any child (of any age) who has yet to come out to their parents and is still trying to figure out how to do it, and if its worth it.
It is. Let Mouse show you why.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
Maupin's second novel retains all the virtues of the first _Tales of the City_, while strengthening the one weak link in the first book: plot. _More Tales of the City_ resolves the dramatic deficiencies of the first _Tales_ by featuring an interlocking set of mostly tongue-in-cheek mysteries. The sleuthing is mostly of the Nancy Drew variety, but the mysteries are well developed, and various clues and revelations are deftly spaced throughout the novel. Of course, there is a larger point: Many of these tales address the rise of religious fundamentalism (and the subsequent decline of public tolerance) during the late 1970s. Michael Tolliver--the only character not directly involved in dime-novel shenanigans--gets the novel's one truly affecting scene: his letter to Mom and Dad forms the thematic and emotional core of the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
OK, so it's not quiiiiiiite as good as the first one. But make no mistake about it - Michael Tolliver's coming out letter to his parents is one of the most significant, inspiring, empassioned, and beautifully articulated passages in the history of gay literature, and should be required reading for every gay man and woman, their friends, their parents, their families - and especially the Christian Right. It's worth the cover price alone for this stunning passage.
But beyond that, there's still a heap of fun to be had by all; the seventies are beautifully evoked in all their carefree splendour, and Mouse remains one of the loveliest characters in modern fiction.
Like a good wine, the series gets better with time. Savour it.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin on March 11, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book, published originally as a newspaper column about six months after the original "Tales of the City" series, is notable mostly because it clarifies all the mysteries surrounding Anna Madrigal, the elusive landlady featured at the center of all the novels. When the truth about her identity comes out, explaining why Norman was after her in the first book and for whom he worked, prepare to be stunned. Though the truth has always been just out-of-reach regarding Mrs. Madrigal, you're not going to believe the doozy in store for you.
This book is also notable because it continues the story of Michael and Jon, featuring a touching scene in which Michael finally outs himself to his family. Also, since Michael spends much of the book coping with a case of temporary paralysis (which I still don't quite understand), there are all sorts of new jokes the howlingly funny, sarcastic character gets to make.
As for Mary Ann, she opens up a bit more, which is welcome, and deals with a rather twisted mystery. And DeDe evolves into a far more interesting individual with the help of D'or, of all people.
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