Customer Reviews


66 Reviews
5 star:
 (36)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (7)
1 star:
 (19)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


106 of 123 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So Why Are Mormons Upset About This?
The book merely outlines Mormon belief and responds with orthodox Judao-Christian theology. Why does this mean the authors are their enemies? I grew up in this church and know what I was taught and the authors do not misrepresent anything. I'm also rather amazed at the claims of some of the reviewers regarding the early Christian church and the Bible being translated...
Published on February 15, 2006 by Zig Gey

versus
20 of 31 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An Unconvincing Work
An interesting read, however, if I could sum up this work in a word, that word would have to be "unconvincing." Each chapter picks and pulls various scriptural references from the Bible and stretches them to the limits of the imagination. Read, research, and you'll see! At the same time, we are left without reference to whole passages in the Bible that tend to...
Published on March 20, 2001 by stevenstuller


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

106 of 123 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So Why Are Mormons Upset About This?, February 15, 2006
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
The book merely outlines Mormon belief and responds with orthodox Judao-Christian theology. Why does this mean the authors are their enemies? I grew up in this church and know what I was taught and the authors do not misrepresent anything. I'm also rather amazed at the claims of some of the reviewers regarding the early Christian church and the Bible being translated over and over again by priest after priest. The Bible, whatever version, was translated from the original into English, and the New Testament is, in fact, the record of Christ and His church after His death. Other records also exist. There are, of course, different interpretations and different creeds, but there is no evidence that God reached down from on high and "removed" His church from the Earth and that "truth" depends on arcane organization or hand-shakes or obscene hugs and annointings or that a priest, or a bishop or even a pope has some sort of special powers, like a magician's license.

And since I spent so much of my first twenty years attending classes and seminary and sunday school and fast and testimony meeting and the dreaded stake conference, I can speak (for you Mormons, make that "spake") or testify in court if you'd like that Mormon's regularly misrepresent the theology of Christian churches, and in fact, say that the Roman Catholic Church and by association all other apostastolic churches are the "Church of the Devil". Pretty ugly stuff that! This book, by contrast, is at all times respectful, while challenging the Mormon's theology.

I notice that those who give the book one star, advance the odd idea that challenging someone's ideas and scholarship constitutes "persecution". Good grief. Talking openly about ideas, religion, politics, history, etc. etc. is called freedom, and the absurd notion that disagreeing with a church's tenents constitutes enemy status is frankly scary. That, dear hearts, is the reasoning the Kremlin used to put people in Gulags and the German's used to put everyone but Arians into death camps. Mormon's are the ones inviting investigation and publication of their beliefs because they are sending their missionaries out two-by-two to gain converts without telling them the whole story. Looking into those beliefs is called "fact finding".

As a supporter of free exchange of ideas and views (that freedom thing again), I also have an interest since as a taxpayer, the rest of us get to take up the slack for the 10% being given to a church which does no good works outside their own flock. Not only don't they have an equivalent to Mother Theresa, there's also no efforts similar to the Salvation Army.

This book is a must if you're considering conversion, and for Mormons, I would think they'd WANT to know the arguments against their beliefs, if for nothing else, so they'd have a better concept of why Christians consider them a cult and Catholics and Methodists require rebaptism if a Mormon joins those churches. How can Mormons insist they're Christians when they don't comprehend why others consider them a cult?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


76 of 97 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Falling on Deaf Ears, December 11, 2001
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
I've read some of the reviews here that continually blast this work. It's sad because most of these bad reviews are from Mormons who disagree with the authors for fear that the authors may be correct. The authors were extremely fair in presenting their well-documented evidence; unfortunately the evidence conflicts with Mormon beliefs, ergo reviews of cynicism followed. Those few Mormons who can read this book and not have the automatic reflex of dismissing it as "anti-Mormon" might actually glean some relevant information about the LDS Church. I've studied the LDS Church and each time I come across a work by non-LDS authors dealing with the LDS Church, the Mormons seemingly always display an "us verses them" mentality (the reviews here are case-in-point). This work provides great information and should be read by all interested in or a member of the LDS Church. Hopefully one day, books that speak fairly of the Mormon Church will not fall on the deaf ears of its members.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


36 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book on Mormonism I've read, April 16, 2006
By 
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
I became very interested in studying Mormonism after I took some "missionary lessons" from Mormon missionaries who came to my door. They were nice young men but they were truly unable to answer many questions that I had. The difference between the content of their lessons and the content of the research I did is indescribable.

I've read several books now, including the controversial, The God Makers. I prefer Mormonism 101 to any book I've read because this book documents and references everything very well. Not one thing is claimed without very accurate proof.

However one thing I have noticed to be consistently true is that believing Mormons are very difficult to talk religion with. Overall they are programmed to deny anything that the church has successfully kept from them their whole lives. In the beginning I was really shocked at how few Mormons know anything about their religion. And who can blame them? At their church and on their official website not one word of anything the Mormon church wants to keep from them is mentioned. The most truthful accusation I've ever heard about the Mormon church is how much they sanitize their history and teachings. IT IS SO TRUE.

Even the Mormon bishop that I got to know over time denied to me that Joseph Smith was ever a polygamist. He was a very kind man but obviously like most Mormons, very ignorant to the truths of Mormon history. He even joked with me and said that if the Mormon church had to do it over again they definately would not have named their big university after Brigham Young because now there is so many things about Brigham Young that is exposed on the internet that is causing deep problems and embarrassments to the Mormon church.

This world is full of history of false organizations that have a following of devout believers. The Mormon church is no different. Joseph Smith is one of the most successful con men ever to live in America. It is so rediculously obvious but believing Mormons will always refuse to research it.

And from an archaelogist's point of view, the Book of Mormon couldn't be any more rediculous. There is so much evidence that disproves the Book of Mormon, but again, believing Mormons are just too innocently narrow-minded.

At my new church that I've just started to attend, there is an ex-Mormon support group which is really growing. One may wonder why someone who has left this religion may need to join a support group. Well study the Mormon religion for yourself and you will see why.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


71 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fair Look at Mormon Theology, January 6, 2002
By 
Bradley P. Rich (Salt Lake City, UT USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
As someone who was raised as a Mormon, I have been surprised at how little serious theology is done inside the Mormon church. The current president of the church admitted on a national televison interview that he didn't know much about theology. I have always suspected that the church was unprepared to come to grips with changes in theological positions over the years, and hence, chose to ignore it. Outside analysis has been strident, and frequently generated more heat than light over these issues, leaving the reader to wonder about the fairness of the analysis.
Mormonism 101 avoids the combative tone and for the most part, gives accurate positions for Mormon theology. They expose many of the flaws and inconsistencies in Mormon doctrine. Recognize that their analysis is designed to show that Mormonism is not a Christian religion and to sell the reader on the alternative belief system, Christianity, and that the authors' analysis showing that alternative Christian beliefs are somehow better may leave the skeptical reader cold. Those caveats notwithstanding, this is a good introduction to the problems that infest Mormon theological underpinnings. This book is highly recommended, but is less useful as a general introduction to Mormonism than Mormon America by Richard and Joan Ostling, which is the best general introduction to Mormon history, theology and power structure. Nevertheless, well worth reading!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A WIDE-RANGING CRITIQUE OF "MORMONISM", November 28, 2011
By 
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
Bill McKeever is the President of Mormonism Research Ministry, and also the author of books such as Answering Mormons' Questions, In Their Own Words: A Collection of Mormon Quotations, Questions to Ask Your Mormon Friend: Effective Ways to Challenge a Mormon's Arguments Without Being Offensive, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 2000 book, "It is unfortunate that some Latter-day Saints may assume that we were motivated to write this book out of hatred or bigotry. Be assured that we are moved with the same compassion felt by the LDS missionaries and lay members who attempt to defend what they believe to be true... This book is the result of our concern for those who belong to the LDS faith as well as for those Christians who want to better understand the beliefs of their Mormon friends, relatives, and neighbors."

Here are some more quotations from the book:

"A common rebuttal to the Isaiah passages is that these verses speak only of idols... Are we really expected to believe that idols had not been formed AFTER God?" (Pg. 54)
"Perhaps for lack of a better term, the word 'henotheism' best describes the LDS position. Henotheism allows for the belief in many gods while only worshiping one of those gods." (Pg. 55)
"While SOME apostasies were certainly predicted (in the New Testament), a COMPLETE apostasy where God's authority fully left the earth was never predicted or implied." (Pg. 81)
"Martin Harris, upset the Mormon founder when he declared that 'Joseph drank took much liquor when he was translating the Book of Mormon' and that he knew more than Smith did. Smith retaliated for Harris's many antics by twice referring to him as a 'wicked man' in Mormon scripture." (Pg. 110)
"Many Mormons file the Christian view of hell (eternal punishment with no second chances) to be both unfair and offensive... This complaint seems strange since it is taught in Mormonism that the devil and his demons are also God's spirit children... If Mormonism is ttue, then one-third of God's children who were cast out of heaven in the preexistence will automatically end up in hell and eternal torment. How is this any more 'fair'?" (Pg. 174)
"If the Mormon God has removed the curse that was once on the black race, why has he not also removed the mark? If the sole purpose of the black skin was merely to identify those who should not receive priesthood blessings, and that no longer applies, why are people still being born with this mark?" (Pg. 243)
"It would also appear that the signing of the (1890) Manifesto was merely a ploy to get the federal government to relax its sanctions against the LDS Church and to allow Utah to become a state in 1896." (Pg. 248)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Overall Introduction I Have Found, June 17, 2003
By 
Martin W. Eldred (Eagle River, Alaska United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
As a Lutheran pastor who has studied the Latter Day Saints (Mormon) Church off and on for over twenty years, and who has worked with Christians who are curious about their teachings for almost as long, I highly recommend this book. It is both accessible to the lay person just beginning to explore as well as a helpful resource to pastors and teachers.
The layout of the book is very "user-friendly" and highlights six key concepts of LDS teaching, comparing them with historic Christianity. Each examination is done with an even-handed approach, avoiding the rancor, sarcasm, or disrespect to which many such publications often fall. There are many first source (LDS) works cited and that, combined with an extensive foot-notation and bibliography make this a scholarly as well as readable book.
There are plenty of other works that treat this subject in greater depth, but in my opinion, no work that I have found does a better job of layout the essential differences between biblical Christian and Latter Day Saint theology and practice. Our congregation will soon be holding a class on Mormonism, and this book will be my recommendation as the textbook. Buy it now and read it. Better yet, read it with a LDS friend or family member who is truly committed to finding the truth.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and Accurate Resource, June 20, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
This book is fantastic. I found it to be gentle and informative and not harsh and condemning like a lot of anti-mormon literature. Each chapter is dedicated to a particular doctrine and at the end of each chapter it shows the biblical inconsistencies with each of their beliefs. Furthermore, it gives witnessing tools.
My dear Mormon friend read this book and found it accurate and non-condemning. They are extremely religious and very involved in the church so she was upset that someone had "broken covenant" by talking about what went on the temple... as it is highly secretive.
I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn what the LDS church REALLY believes and wants to know how to confront mormoms with their false doctrine in a safe, christ like manner!
Stay away from the book "The Godmakers" - it is garbage and hateful.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is one of the Best., January 28, 2003
By 
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
This book is excellent. I am confused as to why some of the reviews here say the authors are hiding some secret agenda. These detractors use semantics challenging the validity of the title of the book, and then proceed to build their argument on baseless accusations and name-calling. Don't be swayed by these straw men. The authors are neither ignorant nor dishonest. In fact, they use straightforward and coherent examples of the differences between Christianity and Mormonism - which is precisely what the book purports to do. They use quotes from well-known Mormon leaders and compare their words with the Bible. These are not obscure, hard to find, word-of-mouth excerpts, but easily accessible Mormon works, speeches, etc. (which are listed in the Notes and Bibliography sections at the back of the book).
I read parts of the rebuttal on the FAIR web site. I thought their analogous use of Bible passages was specious. But, unlike these people, I would encourage reading the opposing views. It is obvious that McKeever and Johnson have done their homework. I would encourage anyone to read Mormonism 101.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


34 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Evangelical Overview of Mormon Theology, April 23, 2005
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
MORMONISM 101 is an evangelical overview of Mormon theology. It is not a tool used to help Mormons see their errors although it may. McKeever is actually writing this book to Christians to help them understand Morminism. It is his prayer that Christians will engage Mormons and discuss their faiths in order to help Mormons see that salvation doesn't come through our own good works but by God's grace alone.

Overall I found this book to be very simple to read and understand. McKeever defines Mormon beliefs and defends historic Christianity. The book is written almost like a systematic text with various doctrines given their own chapter. McKeever does spend time looking at LDS cardinal teachings such as Joseph Smith, the Book of Mormon and other LDS Scriptures, and their practices such as LDS temples and rituals, baptism for the dead, and "we can be gods" teachings.

A helpful review of official LDS teachings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


38 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thorough, Accurate & Up to date, July 14, 2000
By 
Lane Thuet (Lancaster, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
I have read many books about the LDS Church, and found most to be re-hash of old quotes and references from dead LDS leaders. This book was refreshing since it mostly quotes from LDS leaders over the past 10 years. I was LDS for 23 years, and I can say without reservation that this book accurately represents LDS teachings and beliefs. I was also a temple Mormon, and the section on the LDS temple is accurate and informative, without being hard to read or boring. They discuss the most important Christian doctrines with clear support for their non-denominational position from the Bible, and compare them with what the LDS Church believes about those same teachings. Overall, the book is an excellent information source for Christians, and a valuable read for any LDS member. I highly recommend it for Mormons and Christians alike.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Mormonism 101:  Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints
Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints by Bill McKeever (Paperback - April 1, 2000)
$22.00 $19.20
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.