Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Melanie Martinez $5 Off Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Disney Infinity 3.0 Gear Up for Football Deal of the Day
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.98
  • You Save: $9.79 (49%)
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by Sunday River and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Moro No Brasil - A Film B... has been added to your Cart
Used: Good | Details
Sold by BookBusterz
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This is a good ex-library copy with the usual markings. The disc is near flawless and like new. The case is free of cracks and contains only minor imperfections.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.69
Learn More
Trade in now
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$11.36
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Moro No Brasil - A Film By Mika Kaurisma
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Moro No Brasil - A Film By Mika Kaurisma

16 customer reviews


Start Your 30-Day Free Trial of Amazon Prime
Start Your 30-Day Free Trial of Amazon Prime Stream thousands of movies & TV shows anytime, anywhere. Start your free trial
$10.19 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by Sunday River and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Moro No Brasil - A Film By Mika Kaurisma + The Sound of Rio: Brasileirinho + Bossa Nova
Price for all three: $33.45

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Moro no Brasil ("I Live in Brazil") is a musical journey that delves deeply into the heart of Brazil. Experience Brazilian culture and get to know its people with over 50 musical performances from the streets of Brazil, including interviews and performances by Walter Alfaiate & Seu Jorge, Antonio Nobrega, Darue Malungo, Silverio Pessoa, Margareth Menezes, Ivo Meirelles and more. Moro no Brasil is a stirring passionate documentary that grants the viewer unparalleled access to the diversity and musical richness of Brazilian music, reaching far beyond Samba and Bossa Nova. Writer/director Mika Kaurismaki’s musical journey covers 4,000 kilometers, with stopovers in Pernambuco, Bahia and Rio de Janeiro, and presents the voyage from the roots of samba to its present-day excursions into rap and funk.

Track Listings:
Beginning In Pernambuco
Caruaru
Home With Silverio Pessoa
Recife
Caju & Catanha
Darue Malungo
Bahia
Rio de Janeiro
Walter Alfaiate & Seu Jorge
Mangueira
Ivo Meirelles
I Live In Brazil


Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Walter Alfaiate, Caju, Castanha, Velha Guarda da Mangueira, Seu Jorge
  • Directors: Mika Kaurismäki
  • Writers: Mika Kaurismäki, George Moura
  • Producers: Eila Werning, Frank Scharf, Hans Robert Eisenhauer, Joachim Ortmanns, Lothar Mattner
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English, Portuguese
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Milan Records
  • DVD Release Date: June 13, 2006
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000FIHNHU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #81,057 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Moro No Brasil - A Film By Mika Kaurisma" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By marc on November 10, 2006
Format: DVD
This is a very fine trip through a variety of music styles starting with a native 'indian' village in the north of Brasil, through the Sertao back country marketplaces, stopping in Recife, Salvador Bahia, and ending in Rio. The theme of the movie is there are three roots to the evolving Brazilian music scene: Indian, African, European, and by starting in the north, we move through this evolution in styles. There is plenty of live footage from street musicians and in clubs. Many of the music styles are unknown even to Brazilians from other parts of the country, so even they will learn much about their own musical heritage. The film is narrated in English with subtitles translating the musicians interviews. The producers of this film were the ones who did "The Buena Vista Social Club" and they wanted a similar film about Brazil. Brazil being so huge a country, there are many more styles to show, and the director does it with flair, emotion, and great color.

While the film ends in Rio, of course there are even more regional styles (and my favorite, chorinho is not filmed!) further south, but perhaps those will be seen in a sequel one day.

Very Highly Recommended for lovers of travel, complex rhythms, and Brasil!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tereza on March 9, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a road-movie which covers many places in the huge Brazil where music plays an important role. The director had to choose some places and kinds of music to focus on, because otherwise he would have made Moro no Brasil I, II, III, IV, V, etc.

The places and the artists chosen are simply delicious!! The places are very authentic and the artists are incredibly spontaneous!! The movie makes us understand how Brazilian people are so musical, and that's because their own nature!! Music is in their blood and DNA!! Many times the most humble person is capable of creating excellent music without any training, classes or instruction!!!

I don't know if this happens in other places, but for sure Brazil is one of the places to research about good music!!!

Enjoy!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Angelinha on November 26, 2006
Format: DVD
Someone totally obsessed with the music of Northeastern Brazil made this film, and he was willing to take the lesser names, along with the legends to make his passionate point...the point being that this music is born of the dust of Brazil, of the best part of the Brazilian collective heart, of the part we all who love Brazil have saudade for... I was riveted the entire time and feel a debt of gratitude to the director for sharing this remarkable music and the even more creative people that transcend their tough lot in life bearable through music.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By King Reis on February 6, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Very nice documentary, but I think that "Brasileirinho", from the same director is more focused and more interesting.

"Moro no Brasil" starts showing the Brazilian native indians and their musical roots in the Northeast. Then it quickly moves to Bahia and then goes to Rio de Janeiro, where Samba becomes the main subject.

It's a patchwork, showing a lot of different people and a great variety of musical traditions. Good job for a 100-minute documentary.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Justin F. Gaynor on January 26, 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The main problem, unfortunately, was the music, but let's work out way up to that.

This movie struck me as jarringly inauthentic as I was watching it, and my instincts were correct. The very opening scene shows a guy huddled up in a Finnish blizzard with the wind literally screaming -- on the soundtrack, anyway, although the image on the screen showed a bunch of trees whose branches weren't even twitching, and calm, unruffled water. And that, unfortunately, typified the movie as a whole -- all these "road movie" scenes that were obviously staged, contrived, and controlled down to the last glittering feather and coconut-shell bra.

The director, a hulking blond guy wearing black sunglasses, kept showing up in nearly every scene, for no apparent reason. We see him skulking around in a market, but he doesn't speak with anyone or buy anything. We see him leaning against the wall of a bar where a band is playing, arms crossed and showing no apparent enjoyment of the music. We see a legendary Rio singer getting a shave in a barbershop, and then the camera pulls back to reveal the director in an adjoining chair, also being shaven -- why? I have no idea what the strategy behind this was, but the net effect was to make him look creepy and stalker-ish.

If you stick around to the end and watch the 'Interview with the Director," you learn that the entire purported story of him coming to Brazil to travel around learning about music is complete B.S. -- the company that financed "Buena Vista Social Club" wanted to make some quick cash with a similar movie about Brazil, but lacking a Ry Cooder they found this guy instead. The problem is, he'd been living in Brazil for ten years already, and went there to open a bar, not to research the roots of Samba.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a revealing and musically interesting survey of the musical origins of modern Brazilian styles more known in North America and Europe. Even though I was familiar with both the Northeast and Rio this was a learning experience that opened my eyes to many things I'd been missing--and a new collection of music. In particular it covers the many musical styles of the Northeast that feed into the better known Samba from Rio. Anyone familiar with the Carnival Samba School parades will begin to recognize specific components after viewing this film. For example, the origin of the heavy percussion section, the bateria, is found in the Northeastern maracatu. That itself has two major styles: maracatu de nação and maracatu rural. The Northeast is particularly rich in these strains and the state of Pernambuco alone has more than a double handful of distinct styles, including the carnival spectacular, very fast frevo. From the far Northeast the film shifts to Bahia and Salvador with samba-reggae and axé that also influenced those parades and modern samba. It wraps up in Rio with samba and more recent funk. Some, as I did, may have a new interest in collecting modern works in the various musical traditions.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Moro No Brasil - A Film By Mika Kaurisma
This item: Moro No Brasil - A Film By Mika Kaurisma
Price: $11.36
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: bresser free shipping, indigenous dvd