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Moroccan Arabic: Shnoo the Hell is Going On Hnaa? A Practical Guide to Learning Moroccan Darija - the Arabic Dialect of Morocco Paperback – July 1, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0982440902 ISBN-10: 0982440901

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 142 pages
  • Publisher: Collaborative Media International (July 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0982440901
  • ISBN-13: 978-0982440902
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,296,990 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By C. Gaffney on August 3, 2009
Having traveled in Morocco I know of the difficulties in picking up Arabic on the fly, but this book has made the structure of Arabic intelligible while providing useful tools for practical use. Highly recommended!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Edward F. on May 22, 2010
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The cover of this book hypes it, but all the hypers are connected to the Moroccan center that published it or have connections o the author or the producer. One of the two reviews online at the time I am writing this was written by someone with the author's same last name, which may be a coincidence, but I doubt it. I was caught by the hype and bought the book. It's not a terrible book, but it really needs some work. It's definitely not worth the asking price. The author starts by noting his issues with other books out there for Moroccan Arabic, and in that regard, he's unfortunately right, although I like the Harrell book anyway, despite some of its sample sentences like "I gave the rifle to the judge." Sakulich shows several transliteration schemes (systems of writing the Arabic words using Roman letters and other symbols) for Arabic and then notes that he's come up with his own based upon how he hears the language. He provides no explanation of it. So we are left with having to guess how to pronounce such words as bghreet, msleem, and fhm. He is also inconsistent, noting bghreet and bgheet as the same word. In bghreet, there is no "r" pronounced, but in Maghreb, the 'r" is pronounced, and his system doesn't differentiate this. Is it "mm-sleem" or "musleem"? The choice of topics feels incredibly hit or miss, and he even admits this a bit in various lists he provides. The book is praised for its humor, which I found sort of sophomoric, such as the author's quote on the back cover (It's a good book, I guess.")

On a happier note, his explanations are pretty spot on, even if they gloss over the complexities of the language.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Richard Sakulich on October 17, 2009
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Having also traveled to Morocco, I am aware of the difficulty and subtlety of the language. One of the great points of this book is the humor that is spread throughout both in the theatrical asides and the choice of words and phrases as examples. Language texts are universally dry and often boring but the author has managed to lighten up a difficult subject and thus make it easier to absorb.
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