Buy New
$25.86
Qty:1
  • List Price: $30.95
  • Save: $5.09 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Moscow - 2042 Paperback – September 24, 1990


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$25.86
$20.58 $0.27


Frequently Bought Together

Moscow - 2042 + We
Price for both: $33.05

Buy the selected items together
  • We $7.19

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 444 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; Reprint edition (September 24, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0156621657
  • ISBN-13: 978-0156621656
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 6.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,297,143 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

An emigre Russian writer named Kartsev narrates a bawdy, self-deprecating tale of travel from West Germany in 1982 to Moscow circa 2042, where much has changed (but not the Soviet penchant for re-writing history). "Voinovich, author of the Private Ivan Chonkin books, is goodnatured and irreverent, but his work doesn't have Orwell's deadpan bite," noted PW.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The Russian emigration has produced a phenomenal amount of literature for reasons perhaps not wholly literary. The present novels, fine works by two radically different "stars" of the emigration, share its salient features: keen intellect and constricted subject matter (politics and autobiography). Voinovich has excelled in witty political fiction over the past 20 years. Here a time-travel story lampoons two of the intelligentsia's sacred cows: nostalgia for the monarchy and yearning for "perfect" communism free of Soviet corruption. Voinovich's sexism, combined with the genre's tendency towards one-dimensional characters, defuses his parable; but his acute depictions of bureaucratic minutiae and a wild-eyed messiah generate a current of entertaining satire. Limonov has scandalized the emigration with his fascination for sex and drugs. His autobiographical narrative displays the emigre inability to step out of characterbut what a character! "Edward," butler to a Manhattan millionaire, is a cad, an opportunist, and a brilliant observer of humanity. A "servant-philosopher," he impartially mocks Americans and Russians alike as he lives off the fat of capitalism. This book is a naughty and genuine thrill to read, outrageously peppered with thinly disguised, near-libelous anecdotes of New York and Russian celebrities.Rob Schmieder, Boston
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R. W. Holsbergen on October 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
The famous dissident writer Vladimir Voinovich wrote this book a couple of years before the downfall of the Sovient Union. So, in how far this satire about life in the communist "Moscow Republic" of 2042 is still relevant?
I would not exclude the alarming possibility that Russia might still evolve in something like the nightmare of "Moscow 2042".
In this book the Russian author Kartsev, living in München in 1982, makes a time travel to the Moscow of 2042. After the "Great August Revolution" the new leader "Genialissimus" has changed the Soviet Union ... up to a certain point. After Lenins dream of a world revolution and Stalins experiment of 'Socialism within one country', Genialissimus has decided to build "Communism within one city", Moscow. The ideology has changed somewhat, into a hotchpotch of marxism-leninism and Russian orthodoxy (Genialissimus himself is also patriarch!) The decay, from which the Soviet Union suffered, has gone further and further. The rest of the Soviet Union, where people barely survive, has been separated by a Berlin type of wall from the "paradise" of Moscow, where communism has been (sort of) realised. Within the wall everyone gets everything "according to his needs". Only their needs are not decided by themselves, but by the wise Genialissimus. And of course, most people have "ordinary needs", but a chosen few have "extraordinary needs". For the first class, life is dismall even within the priviliged "Moscow Republic".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By R. W. Holsbergen on October 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
The famous dissident writer Vladimir Voinovich wrote this book a couple of years before the downfall of the Sovient Union. So, in how far this satire about life in the communist "Moscow Republic" of 2042 is still relevant?
I would not exclude the alarming possibility that Russia might still evolve in something like the nightmare of "Moscow 2042".
In this book the Russian author Kartsev, living in München in 1982, makes a time travel to the Moscow of 2042. After the "Great August Revolution" the new leader "Genialissimus" has changed the Soviet Union ... up to a certain point. After Lenins dream of a world revolution and Stalins experiment of 'Socialism within one country', Genialissimus has decided to build "Communism within one city", Moscow. The ideology has changed somewhat, into a hotchpotch of marxism-leninism and Russian orthodoxy (Genialissimus himself is also patriarch!) The decay, from which the Soviet Union suffered, has gone further and further. The rest of the Soviet Union, where people barely survive, has been separated by a Berlin type of wall from the "paradise" of Moscow, where communism has been (sort of) realised. Within the wall everyone gets everything "according to his needs". Only their needs are not decided by themselves, but by the wise Genialissimus. And of course, most people have "ordinary needs", but a chosen few have "extraordinary needs". For the first class, life is dismall even within the priviliged "Moscow Republic".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reader on February 1, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Biting commentary on the (then) Marxist system that controlled the USSR and everything in it. From making fun of weird Marxist claims of future prosperity (tomorrow, next year, ten years from now, in your children/grandchildren's lifetime) to describing the drabness of Soviet society, Voinovich renders an Animal Farm crossed with Animal House.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Catspec on April 29, 2002
Format: Paperback
For irony and surrealism this story is a ten. It is, again, a wrenching look at Soviet life, and another Voinovich masterpiece. I won't retell the plot because another reviewer did that well. The society of Moscow in 2042 is based on the droll equation - "Output=Input", and whatever one receives is directly proportional to what one turns in in the way of output. And this is just what it sounds like. Read this book and hope it doesn't happen.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Moscow 2042 is one of my favorites by Voinovich (and I've read all his books). Very biting satirical humor. I believe this style of writing is difficult to master, one of the reasons I admire Voinovich. Moscow 2042 was my favorite until reading Monumental Propaganda.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By M. Shinkarovsky on June 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Really, really funny, with lots of dry humor. Voinovich makes fun of the Soviet establishment as much as of the "famous dissident".
Highly recommend. It is a classic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?