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55 of 57 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good correction
I became a follower of Jesus in College. I joined a great campus group that helped set the foundation for my life of devotion to Jesus. One of the best things about this group was their commitment to scripture (Bible) memorization. Each week each of us had new Bible verses that we were memorizing. It set a great foundation for me.

But later those verses I...
Published 24 months ago by Kevin Smith

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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Superficial, Confusing, Unsatisfying Exegesis of Biblical Texts
This book was rather disappointing for me. I thought it would be an exegetically in-depth discussion on how certain verses in the Bible ought to be properly interpreted. It is not that Bargerhuff's method of interpretation is necessarily wrong, but discussion was superficial and interpretations ascertained solely on the basis of context (and maybe some common sense and...
Published 18 months ago by Nelson Banuchi


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55 of 57 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good correction, August 22, 2012
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This review is from: The Most Misused Verses in the Bible: Surprising Ways God's Word Is Misunderstood (Paperback)
I became a follower of Jesus in College. I joined a great campus group that helped set the foundation for my life of devotion to Jesus. One of the best things about this group was their commitment to scripture (Bible) memorization. Each week each of us had new Bible verses that we were memorizing. It set a great foundation for me.

But later those verses I had memorized got me into "trouble". I don't remember which verse first got me rebuked but I do remember the one that stung the most. I was in a college group on a different campus and we were at a prayer meeting. I was talking about how great prayer meetings are and I quoted Matthew 18:20:
"For where two or three have gathered together in My name, I am there in their midst." (NASB - the popular translation in that group for memorizing Scripture)
One woman in the group said to me right away "That verse isn't even about prayer." She was a mature Christian and I was very young in the faith. I felt put down and stupid. After the prayer meeting I went to the leader to find out what I did wrong. I had quoted that verse out of context to make it mean something that it didn't mean in the Bible. By taking one verse out of a discussion of paragraphs I had twisted scripture. And yet I was frustrated - this verse was from a Bible memorization package. (This book covers this passage in Chapter 4)

I had other experiences like this one. I learned then that some people read the Bible not for what it says, but for nice quotes to cut out and apply as they wish.

This book does a fine job at looking at some key verses and helping us understand how we mis-use the Bible and how we can understand the passage better. I like his approach - it's easy reading and very clear. He has a passion to help us to understand the Bible, not to find quotes from the Bible that we can use as we wish.

The first half of the book takes on some very common mis-used passages. I wish these chapters were mandatory reading for all Christians. The last bunch of chapters I kept finding myself saying "you're kidding, people really use this verse that way?" but this might be a cultural or denominational thing. Some of these chapters I read quite quickly because they just didn't seem that important to me.

I still believe in the value of scripture memorization but in my own scripture memorization I took to writing on my memory cards not only the subject matter but also the context of the passage. This helps me stay more true to what the Bible says and not what I want it to say.

Read this book.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much-Needed Guidance, May 1, 2012
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This review is from: The Most Misused Verses in the Bible: Surprising Ways God's Word Is Misunderstood (Paperback)
Who would have imagined that Christians would read some of their favorite verses of the Bible and misunderstand them?

"God won't give us more than we can handle." Is that what the verse says? What about praying, "in Jesus' name"? Do we have to end all prayers in those three words in order for the prayer to work? Does God only meet with us if there are two or three gathered?

Eric Bargerhuff provides a short summary of eighteen verses that have been misused and helps us accurately apply them for today.

A few verses that can be found in this book are:
"Judging others" - Matthew 7:1
"Plans to prosper you, not to harm you" - Jeremiah 29:11-13
"Where two or more are gathered" - Matthew 18:20
"Ask for anything in my name" - John 14:13-14
"No more than you can handle" - 1 Corinthians 10:13
"Train up a child" - Proverbs 22:6
"I can do all things" - Philippians 4:13
"Prayer offered in faith" - James 5:15

Eric will explain the context of the verses, how they are typically taken out of context, and how we can accurately apply them in our situations today.

You will be surprised at how often we view Scripture through the lens of "American Christian" instead of why it was written in the first place. It's the basic principle of who, what, when, where, and why.

This would make an excellent discussion book. It's only missing the study guide questions at the end that every other Biblical studies genre now carries.

This book was provided for review, at no cost, by Bethany House Publishing.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Or How Not to Read More Into Verses than we Should, July 5, 2012
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I used this book as a devotion, reading each chapter either in the morning or before bed. Of course, I never realized I had misinterpreted some very common Bible verses until I read this book. But I had begun to wonder why verses that I had claimed as promises were not turning out that way. Example: "Train up a child in the way he should go and when he is old he will not depart from it." Now that my kids are grown and one has turned his back on God, I've been wondering what happened. The author explains that a lot of proverbs have been claimed as promises when they are actually generalities. Usually, if you train your child right they will stay on that path as adults (or come back to it) But he states this is not meant to be a promise.

The book is a fast read, easy to understand and comforting. I highly recommend it to any new or seasoned Christians.
I purchased an additional copy for my son in law for father's day.

I look forward to reading more books by this author.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!!, October 7, 2012
By 
Dolores Ayotte (Winnipeg, Manitoba) - See all my reviews
My gut reaction is to give "The Most Misused Verses in the Bible" by Author Eric J. Bargerhuff a five star rating and these are just a few of the reasons why.

Firstly, it did not turn me "off" the way at lot of other books do. Secondly, it is written in a language that I can understand and relate to. Thirdly, while I recognize that I am no theologian, I truly appreciate the author's skill in relating personal stories to stress the meaning of his message as he gives pertinent examples of popular "misused" Bible quotes. In other words, this author manages to bring home his message without talking down to his reading audience. He actually becomes one of us in his efforts to better explain his point of view!

In my opinion, this is one of the most effective teaching tools. He is openly admitting that he is one of us and explains his own humble beginnings in a bible study group when attending university. I, too, have often heard the expression what "it means to me" on a varied number of topics. Many times, people see themselves as experts without the proper training and education. These people can do more harm than good. When it comes to "The Word of God", I fully agree with this author...Bible verses can very well be misused in order to shore up an individual's point of few. My husband (of 43 years) and I have an ongoing thread of humor in our household. Oftentimes, we see the humor in those who speak the loudest and the most adamant in stressing their point of view, when in reality, they are merely showing their ignorance on the subject...yes, we can all be "adamant in our wrongness". The delivery of any message can make it sound true. I am very pleased, to say the least, in expressing my enjoyment on the gentle approach used in this well-thought out and researched book.

Usually, after I've read and reviewed an e-book on my Kindle, I delete it from my library files. I've read it once and I'm satisfied. In other words, I basically have no desire or intention to reread it. I am giving much credit and an unprecedented compliment to Author Eric J. Bargerhuff. I will not be deleting "The Most Misused Verses in the Bible" from my files. I think that pretty well sums up how much I enjoyed his book. I know I will be rereading it!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worthy read., June 18, 2012
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This review is from: The Most Misused Verses in the Bible: Surprising Ways God's Word Is Misunderstood (Paperback)
This book will help anyone interested in accurately interpreting the Bible. It will help you understand the verses in their context. It is a tool that can help you become one who rightly divides the Word of Truth.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Epiphany: It's basically an applied hermeneutics course in case studies, September 9, 2013
This review is from: The Most Misused Verses in the Bible: Surprising Ways God's Word Is Misunderstood (Paperback)
I really enjoyed this book. To be honest, the title was catchy and grabbed my attention, then when I read where the author studied (TEDS), I figured it was going to be good. It surpassed my expectations in many surprising ways. First, Dr Bargerhuff's writing was very approachable. It was much more conversational than academic, he was transparent throughout, and I found myself continually thinking: "there is a LOT of great information in here, I am learning a lot, and yet it is a surprisingly light read." Each passage is dissected carefully, most of the misinterpretations were familiar to me, but some were new. Regardless, I think he was correct in his assessments; if bringing up a few that aren't too prevalent. Most are, however and, again, he presents the false conclusion(s) followed by a well-argued discussion of the correct interpretation. The biggest surprise was as I got to the conclusion/summary and realized "This was basically a great 'Practical Hermeneutics' course in case study - yet he never ONCE used the word 'hermeneutics.'" I think this is an important book for anyone serious about Following Jesus and understanding the truths of God's Word and Dr. Bargerhuff has done us a great service presenting a practical "how to" manual to do just that in clear, straightforward, and very readable language.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much Needed Honesty in the Scriptures, October 3, 2012
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Bargerhuff does a wonderful job at decrying modern-day scripture twisting with intelligible illustrations. In a day when I feel like I should massage my Bible in the evenings from all the passages that are twisted out of context to manipulate folks with a man-centered theology, I find rest in the rational explanations provided in this book. As someone who preaches in an area saturated with such false teachings as "name it, claim it...blab it grab it", "word faith", and "prosperity gospel", this book is a great reference that is easily accessible and understandable. Among the best scripture abusers such as TD Jakes, Kenneth Copeland, Joyce Meyers, Joel Osteen and others, "The Most Misused Verses in the Bible" is a drink of fresh water to wash such false doctrines out of the American Christian's mouth.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Misused Verses in the Bible, July 3, 2012
By 
Joy Laurenzo (Gaithersburg, Maryland United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Most Misused Verses in the Bible: Surprising Ways God's Word Is Misunderstood (Paperback)
Written in an easy to understand format, Eric takes seventeen verses often used out of context and places them in the setting /context where they belong.
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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Superficial, Confusing, Unsatisfying Exegesis of Biblical Texts, February 22, 2013
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This review is from: The Most Misused Verses in the Bible: Surprising Ways God's Word Is Misunderstood (Paperback)
This book was rather disappointing for me. I thought it would be an exegetically in-depth discussion on how certain verses in the Bible ought to be properly interpreted. It is not that Bargerhuff's method of interpretation is necessarily wrong, but discussion was superficial and interpretations ascertained solely on the basis of context (and maybe some common sense and simple logic). Nothing beyond that is developed.

If the book was "all about learning to properly interpret and apply the truths of the Bible", as the author claims in his "Acknowledgements" (p.12), it leaves out much to be desired. He somehow misses certain pertinent points. Therefore, while his conclusions are not entirely wrong, they do not reflect accurate interpretations of the Biblical texts he cites, which can lead to erroneous views regarding God's moral character as good.

For example:

1. On the interpretation in chapter 5 on John 14:13-14, about asking anything in Jesus' name, as the author concludes, "Our goal in prayer is to see God glorified no matter what" (p.61); and here I have no disagreement. However, that does not necessarily mean God would deny a request that, while it may not be something He specifically willed, nevertheless, is a desire of the petitioner that does not violate His general will. Cannot God answer a prayer even if it does not directly bear on glorifying Himself but is merely a desire of the petitioner that God answers simply because He is gracious?

2. Regarding Rom 8:28, chapter 6, the author states that "all things that happen in the Christian life are designed" to shape us into Jesus' image (p.67). By the word "design", does he mean God ordained, in the Calvinistic sense, "all things" that occur to occur? It would seem so because he further suggests that God is the one who brings "terrible tragedy" upon us (p.69). The question needs to be asked, what loving and good father would do that?

Again, Bargerhuff says, "Even the worst evil that happens...is for a greater good" (68) and gives us some examples. First of all, those examples do not necessarily prove that God designed/preordained these tragedies. These examples only show that God can overturn the resultant evil consequences for a good. His interpretations of the events are mere speculation.

If it is the case that God designed/preordained such events used as examples, then these events are actually a great good and not genuinely evil. Furthermore, if his premise is correct, then no evil event is in reality an evil event but a good event. Bargerhuff practically agrees when in an endnote to this chapter, he asserts that "anything that glorifies God and advances his kingdom purposes could rightly be called good" (#3, pg.170). Essentially, he is saying that there really is no such thing as evil or tragedy; at least, that is the logical conclusion.

Bargerhuff seems to hold to certain errors found in Calvinism and engages their ususal brand of double-speak. This was the most unsatisfying chapter.

3. Chapter 10, regarding God allowing no more than one can handle, is the best chapter, even of handled lightly. This chapter is my only reason why I gave it two rather than one star.

4. Chapter 14 on the "prayer offered in faith" is handled confusingly (as I read it) and leaves open at the conclusion whether or not God will answer the pray made in faith, which flatly contradicts the promise left us in the text he questions, which is James 5:15. His interpretation of it is flawed, and he only adds to the error rather than corrects it.

As I stated earlier, his engagement with the texts he chose is rather simplistic and confusing, so if you're looking for an in-depth book that makes good sense and corrects the misinterpretation others have of certain verses, particularly the ones the author chose to answer, this is not the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Bible Might NOT Say What You Think It Does., November 25, 2012
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I have to admit it, I get so annoyed when people try to comfort you with Bible verses that don't mean what those people think they mean.

Or perhaps you've noticed that all your friends' "life verses" are Phillipians 4:13, and they use it as an excuse to say that Scripture wants them to prevail in everything they attempt (NOT what that verse says, in context, at all). Or perhaps they use the "plans I have for you" verse from Jeremiah, not knowing, or not remembering, that God is promising all those who originally heard those words that they will most likely be dead before those plans come to fruition.

This book does a great job, in a short space, in nice, short, easily digestible pieces, of totally dismantling these and other mis-representations of the Bible and what it does, and doesn't say.

Brilliant.
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The Most Misused Verses in the Bible: Surprising Ways God's Word Is Misunderstood
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