Mothers Who Think: Tales of Real-Life Parenthood and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.99
  • Save: $2.98 (15%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Mothers Who Think: Tales ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mothers Who Think: Tales Of Real-life Parenthood Paperback – April 1, 2000


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.01
$2.87 $0.01
$17.01 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Mothers Who Think: Tales Of Real-life Parenthood + Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son's First Year
Price for both: $28.41

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Washington Square Press; Reprint edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671774689
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671774684
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #589,454 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

This book should come as manna to moms: a multitude of small, wry voices reminding them they're not alone. Mothers Who Think is a collection of pieces from the Salon magazine column of the same name. The column (and the book) has no fixed perspective, no set goal, no political agenda--just a bunch of women writers mouthing off about changing diapers. Okay, more than just diapers. There's Rahna Reiko Rizzuto on her gruesome labor ("the mucus plug ... fell out of my underwear and onto my husband's shoe"); hipMama editor Ariel Gore on family court ("I learned that two professionals on a case are usually worse than none. That three can be dangerous"); Susan Straight on being a single mom and taking care of everything yourself ("I just wish I didn't look so bad doing it"); and Elizabeth Rapoport on being a married mom and taking care of everything yourself ("I must confess I'm a little jaded by these sociological pissing contests. Just wake me when the dads are doing 50 percent. Period"). A couple of dozen others chime in as well, notably novelist Anne Lamott, New York Times reporter Alex Witchel, and sexpert Susie Bright.

Editors Camille Peri and Kate Moses have created a chorus with range: this is not a stream of white, privileged voices interrupted only occasionally by news from the underclass, news from women of color, or news from sexual minorities. If anything, the book is too focused on a wide variety of very personal stories--one often wishes for the gesture of expansion, the linking of the personal to the cultural. Still, that's a small gripe to have with a book that takes us into the brainier, funnier kitchens of motherhood all over America. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Exploring dimensions of motherhood that are far more provocative than discussions of weaning and potty training, these 40 essays strive to offer "an articulate, heartfelt, and sometimes mystified acknowledgment that being a mother is a lifelong lesson in embracing contradiction," according to editors Peri and Moss. Featuring original pieces as well as some that previously appeared in the column by the same name in the online magazine Salon, the collection includes a remarkably wide variety of contributors, from biological to adoptive and lesbian moms and beyond. Anne Lamott dares to reveal that she sometimes takes out her frustations with motherhood on her son because she can, and because he will still love her. Beth Kephart finds inspiration in her disabled son's insistence on playing soccer and struggles to allow him to do it on his own. Susan Straight shares the frayed edges of her life as a single mother of three, while Celeste Fremon finds that former gang members make suitable male role models for her fatherless son. Karen Grigsby Bates combats her son's isolation in a mostly white school by enrolling him in a black social organization. Kim Van Meter recounts the long weekend when she and her partner chose not to adopt a troubled girl. While the essays are not all of the same caliber, even the most ordinary of them will resonate with the thinking mom. Agent, Ellen Levine. Author tour.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Mona Gable is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles. She is a contributing writer to Prevention. She is the author of the 2014 memoir, "Blood Brother: The Gene That Rocked My Family," published by Shebooks on May 7.

Gable's work has appeared in Los Angeles magazine, Fast Company, Pacific Standard, Budget Travel, Salon, Ladies Home Journal, The Huffington Post and other national publications. Since 1990, she has written about social issues, culture, and politics for the Los Angeles Times. In 2006, her story in the Los Angeles Times Sunday magazine on domestic violence in LA's Korean-American community received a Neiman Notable Narrative mention from Harvard.

Her essays have appeared in several anthologies, including "The Maternal is Political: Women Writers at the Intersection of Motherhood and Social Change" and "Mothers Who Think: Tales of Real-Life Parenthood."

Gable grew up in San Diego, California, and is a graduate of UC Berkeley. She has two children.

Customer Reviews

Great book for new moms and current moms.
JC
Some of the pieces are so funny I laughed out loud and made my husband read them.
"anna5373"
It is a collection of extremely well done essays about all aspects of parenting.
Suzanne Amara

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
I picked up this book quite by accident when my son was about four months old and read it on his first plane ride. Honestly, it made me cry. It features a broad spectrum of mother's persepectives, however, I could relate to so many of them. At a time of upheaval in my life, it made me feel like I was not alone. As a first time mom who works full time at a job I love and hate alternatively, who is a staunch republican and married, I still related to so many of the columns. Unlike some of the other reviewers, I do not find the title at all offensive, I think its catchy. I think that we should embrace any book that truly celebrates mothers and recognizes that while some see mothers as one cohesive group of people, we are as varied as any segment of the population. I loved this book and recommend it to any parent who ever feels as if they are fighting to keep their sanity, despite the fact that they love their children so much they could never imagine life without them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Suzanne Amara VINE VOICE on August 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
I had heard about this book for years before I read it. What held me back was the title---I pictured this being a book about not just mothers who think, but mothers who think MORE THAN REGULAR MOTHERS---you know the kind of book. One with essays by mothers who think they are more devoted, more in tune, more able to work and care for their kids at one time..etc. That wasn't what this was at all. It is a collection of extremely well done essays about all aspects of parenting. In my opinion, the best here is On Not Having a Daughter, by Jayne Anne Phillips---about a child not born--I'll remember this writing always. You'll Get Used to It is another great one, about the tough seperation from your child and how you someday do miss how hard it is for them to leave! The Line is White and It is Narrow tells of a boy on the autistic spectrum with a love for soccer, and how his mother helps him make his dreams come true. I could go on and on...lots of terrific writing here. The weakest pieces in my opinion are the few short humor pieces about everything going wrong during childbirth---they are a little too slapstick for me, but they aren't that bad! Highly recommended collection about a topic that doesn't really get that much good writing---the thoughts and ideas of mothering.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Peggy Vincent on July 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most of the essays in this slim but powerful book originally appeared in the Mothers Who Think column on Salon.com, including a real winner by Anne Lamott. Although they vary tremendously in tone, subject, angle, and focus, all together they create a powerfully articulate image of what it means to be Mother. And I'm talking Mother in a minute, interior sense, not in the do-goody style of parenting magazines. There's nothing soapy or sappy in any of these essays - so read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jeanette Faust on April 13, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a life preserver in a sea of parenting books that assume having children means suspending your life as an independent, intelligent and sexual being. In most of these stories, concern and love for one's offspring are balanced by an awareness of retained individuality. There's a really interesting mix of stories running the gamut from death (Camille Peri's heartrending story) to sex (Cynthia Romanov's very amusing fantasy) and a lot in between. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 13, 1999
Format: Hardcover
As I read this thoroughly enjoyable book, I laughed, cried, sighed, cringed, and chuckled. Each essay gave me a look into how motherhood affects one's life and how one's life circumstances can impact the parenting experience. I may have identified with some authors more than others, but all had meaningful stories to tell. Don't miss reading this book! I've already given it twice to friends and probably will do so again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 20, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is one that I give to any pregnant women that I know. I read the hardcover edition of this book in one sitting and felt like someone was articulating truths of motherhood. This book offers articles previously published on Salon in the MWT category. However, the site changed the name and focus of the articles.
Buy this book and suggest it to expecting mamas.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 9, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I feel sad that this book is going to end. It is possible that I will leave it unfinished so that I always have something to look forward to in between diaper changes, visits to Gymboree that would send any sane person in search of Lithium jawbreakers, and glances in the mirror which confirm the fact that Yes, I am definitely a mother and not a starlet waiting to be discovered-- and Yes, I do have Gerbers Boysenberry slathered across both knees.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
I bought this book to hear a variety of voices on the topic of motherhood. With a fussy, incredibly needy baby of my own, the idea of reading sugar coated tales of motherhood repulsed me. What a FIND this book turned out to be!! Filled with stories from all walks of life, this book captures the highs and lows of motherhood with humor and tenderness. Full of Laugh-out-loud moments, muy husband had me reading out loud so we could laugh about running out of diapers and 5 am wake up calls together. A great read that I turn to often for my short story fix.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews