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Motor City Rock and Roll: The 1960's and 1970's (Images of America: Michigan) Paperback – July 28, 2008


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Motor City Rock and Roll: The 1960's and 1970's (Images of America: Michigan) + Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock 'n' Roll in America's Loudest City
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Arcadia Publishing (July 28, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738552364
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738552361
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #795,571 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Title: It's only rock and roll, but he loves it

Author: Wensdy Von Buskirk

Publisher: Observer & Eccentric

Date: 8/7/2008



Bob Harris is proud to be the "oldest Rolling Stones fan in America," especially since the title was bestowed by Mick Jagger himself.



At 78, the Redford resident recently teamed up with attorney John Douglas Peters to publish "Motor City Rock and Roll: The 1960s and 1970s" (Arcadia Publishing, 2008, $19.99). The book, part of Arcadia's "Images of America" series, is a photographic account of musicians with ties to Detroit.



On its cover is a snapshot of a conservative Harris with The Rolling Stones when they visited Detroit on their second American tour in 1965. In 1999, Harris tracked the Stones down at the Townsend Hotel in Birmingham to get the photo signed.



That's when Jagger gave Harris his prized nickname, which has since been immortalized in a song by Benny and the Jets.



For three decades, the Stones photo had lingered in Harris' basement alongside other memorabilia from his days as a concert promoter, band manager and publisher of the "Teen News."



That material, along with Harris' experience as an industry insider, set the foundation for "Motor City Rock and Roll," but the book might never have happened if it weren't for Harris' son Tony, also of Redford.



"He's a commercial painter, always bragging about his dad wherever he goes," Harris said. "He was hired by this lawyer and told him I was looking for someone to help me write a book."



Peters, a published author from Belleville, was intrigued.



"I went to his office, brought him some pictures," Harris said. "I have a cardboard box with hundreds of pictures. He said bring them down, so I did."



Harris' photos inspired an eight-month quest to capture Motor City rock history from the 1930s through Madonna. The book also includes iconic images from Detroit photographers like Frank Pettis and Leni Sinclair, such as Jimi Hendrix on stage at the Masonic Temple, and Janis Joplin arriving at Detroit Metro Airport.



Extensive captions describe each musician's contributions to rock and roll, as well as their relationship to Detroit.



Among them are photos of Highland Park's Bill Haley (of Bill Haley His Comets) shaking hands with Elvis, and Johnny Cash around the time he worked on the Cadillac assembly line on Woodward Ave.



Harris shares stories of driving a young Stevie Wonder home from the Michigan State Fair, meeting a pre-teen Michael Jackson during a local TV appearance, and managing acts like Suzy Quatro, Grand Funk Railroad and Three Ounces of Love.



Youth fueled the fire of rock 'n' roll, and as publisher of "Teen News" Harris rubbed elbows with many musicians that came to town. Some of them faded into obscurity, while others earned legendary status and spots in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.



"I talk to all these stars just like I'm talking to you now," Harris said. "For some reason it just come natural to me. Over the years I've been very lucky. There aren't too many people around who met all these stars."



Harris said he was unfazed by fame, and never made a fortune. Instead, he earned a modest living and raised six children. He now has 19 grandchildren, 25 great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren.



Still, his rock and roll dreams persist. Harris hopes to round up performers from the book for the world's largest book signing and concert.



"I love music. I love the music business," he said. "Anybody who really loves rock and roll should get this book."



"Motor City Rock and Roll" is available wherever books are sold. For more information on Bob Harris, visit www.myspace.com/oldestrollingstonesfan.

Title: Photo book captures Motown years

Author: Javan Kienzle

Publisher: Free Press

Date: 1/11/2009



Bob Harris' "Motor City Rock and Roll" contains more than 200 photos from Detroit's music scene of the 1960s and 1970s, including Mayor Coleman Young sharing a microphone with Della Reese in 1976; the Temptations with Senator and Mrs. Ted Kennedy, Bertha and Berry Gordy and Senator and Mrs. Philip Hart in the '60s, and Highland Park's Bill Haley shaking hands with Elvis in 1955.



The book is a collector's gem that is a must for Motown fans. Harris spent 50 years as a promoter, manager and rock newspaper publisher.



His coauthor, John Douglas Peters, a rock concert promoter in the '60s, is a Detroit trial lawyer.

About the Author

Bob Harris spent 50 years as a promoter, manager, and rock newspaper publisher. Harris's extensive collection of photographs and stories, along with contributions from fans across the country, provide a time capsule view into the golden years of rockin' the Motor City. John Douglas Peters, a rock concert promoter in the 1960s, now a trial lawyer with Charfoos and Christensen, P.C., in Detroit, is also a writer, painter, and past president of Preservation Wayne.

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Of the hundreds of photos in this book only a handful actually have anything to do with historic rock & roll in Detroit.
A. Sattler
There's a Motown group or two shown, and there's a reproduction of an old CKLW top 10 leaflet, but these seem to have been inserted just to "localize" a generic book.
lingvistika
And for all the extraneous filler, there are two gaping holes: there is no mention of Mitch Ryder or P. Funk/Parliament.
Gregory Mills

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By lingvistika on August 22, 2008
Format: Paperback
Because this publisher has produced some very good books on local Detroit lore, I thought I was in for some good history of Detroit popular music when I picked this book off the shelf at a store. However, when I saw the cover has a shot of the Rolling Stones, rather than someone like Mitch Ryder, Bob Seger, Ted Nugent, the MC5 or any of countless other local rock acts made good, I sensed something was amiss.

And something WAS amiss! The book isn't about Motor City Rock and Roll! There's barely a single picture of any Detroit musician in the entire volume, and there's barely any information. It's splashed full of photos of national acts like Sonny & Cher, and some oddly chosen now-forgotten pop singers from other parts of the country. At first I thought the parts that weren't about Detroit music were just the initial orientation for the coverage of Detroit music later in the book. I was wrong. Right to the end, the book is NOT about Motor City rock & roll. There's a Motown group or two shown, and there's a reproduction of an old CKLW top 10 leaflet, but these seem to have been inserted just to "localize" a generic book.

The company that put out this book, Arcadia Publishing, of South Carolina, usually hires local experts on the subject matter of a given tome, so their publications are usually rather good, for what they are. However, in this case, it almost looks as if the publisher hired a couple of people from some other part of the country to write a generic book that could be adapted to various cities, except that the authors seem to be local. The book would leave the uninitiated with the misimpression that, while there are Detroit connections to various national rock acts, there was never a Detroit music scene worthy of note. The book is a sad missed opportunity.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A. Sattler on October 22, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was suspicious to start with of a book this is supposed to be about classic Detroit rock & roll that has a photo of the Rolling Stones on the cover. Where are Bob Seger or the MC5 or Alice Cooper or even Grand Funk Railroad? What about Creem magazine? WKNR, CKLW, WXYZ? Of the hundreds of photos in this book only a handful actually have anything to do with historic rock & roll in Detroit. (I lived there throughout the '60s and '70s and I remember it.) Performance photos could have been taken anywhere as there is nothing distinguishing about them. The few prints of local posters, letters, newspaper and magazine clippings are like a teaser.

I was expecting accounts of rock & roll history in the Detroit area, about musicians who are from the area (including the obscure ones that Detroiters would remember), and maybe about the historic radio stations and clubs, not a bush league catalog of stock publicity photos of artists who are included for the mere act of having once performed in Detroit or having been born there. Tell me, what do Tom Petty, David Bowie, Bad Company, Buddy Holly, Lulu, the Beach Boys or even Bob Dylan or the Beatles have to do with Detroit rock & roll of the '60s and '70s, other than having performed there or having been popular on the radio there? And what on earth do Peggy Lee, Emmylou Harris, Linda Ronstadt, or Jimmy Buffet (fine performers who belong in other books) have to do with rock and roll? The entire first chapter is titled "Rocks Roots" and has nothing to do with Detroit music -- including an entire page on Chick Webb (who honorably belongs in a book on big band and swing music) is simply filler, as are pages on Les Paul, Charlie Christian, Elvis Presley and Bill Haley.

The description on the back of the book is utter sophistry.
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By Don Nicholson on January 30, 2014
Format: Paperback
I was happy to See Bob Harris put his collection into print. I look forward to getting my copy signed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Totally Awsome!!! Really took me back to the day!!! So much Fun!! Puts you in the frame of mind when life was easier!
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