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The Mouse That Roared Paperback – August 1, 1998


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Paperback, August 1, 1998

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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Scholastic Trade (August 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590034383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590034388
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,208,375 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Leon Wibberly was born in Ireland and spent much of his life in California. A prolific author and journalist, he died in 1983. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The author tells the story in a humorous, interesting manner, and the story line is good.
Bradley K. Kay
I highly recommend this book, expecially for readers who enjoy a weall written and easy to read political satire.
Pamela D. Knight
I first read this book when I was in high school, and I liked it so much the first time that I read it again.
Wendy Brown

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jean McGill on June 29, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is the pre-pre-prequel to The Mouse That Roared, that lovely tale of tiny Grand Fenwick versus good old Uncle Sam. If you have ever wondered why the mythical duchy of Grand Fenwick retained the longbow as its official weapon, you must read this book. Long, long ago, before Professor Kokintz and his Q-Bomb, there were still weapons of terror - and ways to get around them.
Leonard Wibberley makes Grand Fenwick come alive as completely and delightfully in the middle ages as he does in the Twentieth Century. This is one of my all-time favorite books for plain old enjoyment.
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35 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Orrin C. Judd VINE VOICE on April 1, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
'Do you believe they'd really explode the bomb?' the President asked.
'Mr. President,' the secretary countered, 'would you have believed they would invade the United States with twenty longbowmen,
landing in Manhattan off a chartered sailing vessel?'
-The Mouse That Roared
Sadly Leonard Wibberley's hilarious satire, The Mouse that Roared seems to be making the slow sad transit from wildly popular bestseller and hit
movie in the 50s and 60s to cult classic in the 70s and 80s to largely forgotten in the 90s and 00s. The book, which was originally serialized in the
Saturday Evening Post from December 1954 to January 1955 as The Day New York Was Invaded, is no longer in print--despite the fact that the
tattered copy I'm holding is something like the 30th printing. And the film does not seem to have been transferred to DVD, though I did find a copy
of the equally funny sequel, The Mouse on the Moon. Our growing amnesia is unfortunate, both because this is just a funny story, and also because
current events reveal it to still be timely.
The tale concerns the Duchy of Grand Fenwick, a tiny European nation which "lies in a precipitous fold of the northern Alps." It was founded in
1370 by British soldier of fortune Roger Fenwick, under not altogether honorable circumstances. Practically the only thing that is produced there,
and the only reason anyone has ever heard of it, is a fine wine called Pinot Grand Fenwick.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 25, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Charming, witty, romantic and it has an action element too. Jean McGill's review of the book does it justice. It tells of the early days of the Duchy of Grand Fenwick during the time of knights and high chivalry. If the word delightful has not been used yet it should be. This book is my favorite of the Mouse series.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kenny Unferth on March 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Although this book is now a bit dated, and the cold war humor might be difficult for younger readers to grasp, it is still a tremendously funny read for those who remember or have studied the cold war days.
In this book a tiny European country decides that the answer to its financial problems lies in going to war with the United States and loosing. After seeing how the US rebuilt its WWII adversaries it really seems the only sensible way out of their current economic crisis. Add to this a perfectly justifiable reason to make war on the United States in the form of an American company marketing a cheap clone of the nations staple wine label, and you have a unanimous decision for war in the great counsels of Grand Fenwick.
The only problem is how to get the Americans to realize that they are at war. An official note declaring war was simply lost in the bureaucracy of the state department. At last they mount a mighty invasion of New York City (with an expeditionary force 20 longbowmen strong). The results are hilarious. Indeed not a chapter went by in which I did not laugh out loud at least a couple times. This was a fun book to read. I think this book is far better than the movie based on it. The only cold war comedy movie that was as good as this book was Dr. Strangelove (although the humor is of a very different verity).
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 14, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The Mouse that Roared is the best political satire I have ever read. I read it thinking I would dislike it, like many novels read in the classroom, but I was wrong. Besides being hilariously funny, this novel criticizes modern day America and the policies of war in a way that is not boring to read. I was hooked from the first mention of the name Grand Fenwick and the explanation of its history. The characters are at once realistic and comical, and the ludicrous ideas of the old-fashioned duchy are actually not so impossible when one considers many Eastern cultures. Altogether a great book!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By James E. Egolf VINE VOICE on June 20, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Leonard Wibberley (1915-1983) wrote a GREAT satire re war, political stupidity (redundant phrase), and a valuable lesson. Readers should be warned that this great novel will disturb hate mongers and those who preach senseless violence. While the novel is humorous, the lessons are serious and deal with Ultimate Questions.

Wibberley began the novel about the tiny microstate called Grand Fenwick which was founded in 1370 under dubious circumstances. According to the novel, Grand Fenwick measured three miles by five miles close to the Alps Mountains. The residents got income by producing wine which was the staple of the economy. When the wine business started to decline, a political party formed called The Dilutionists who wanted to dilute the wine with more water while the anti-Dilutionists thought this was a bad idea. Since Grand Fenwick's wine was sold to Americans, the Dilutionists argued that Americans would not notice because Americans bought wine by label rather than content.

The ruler Gloriana II called a council and one suggestion was that the rulers should claim they faced the threat of Communism and appeal to the US for aid. However, a character named Tully refused to use such a ruse. He did not like Communism nor majority rule. The novel had the rulers of Grand Fenwich declare war on the US, lose, and collect foreign aid which this reviewer thought was the best suggestion. Tully who commanded an army trained and armed with late Medieval attire and weaspons, was told to invade the US and lose. Tully wanted to win. The provocation for war was that a American wine producer used a similar label of their wine which was seen by people of Grand Fenwick as cause for a war declaration.

When the plot and scene shifted to the US, Dr.
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