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Movement: Functional Movement Systems: Screening, Assessment, Corrective Strategies Hardcover – July 15, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-1931046725 ISBN-10: 1931046727 Edition: 1st

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Movement: Functional Movement Systems: Screening, Assessment, Corrective Strategies + Athletic Body in Balance + Becoming a Supple Leopard: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 407 pages
  • Publisher: On Target Publications; 1 edition (July 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931046727
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931046725
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 8.7 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #40,821 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Gray's premise is beautiful in its simplicity: Training movement can fix muscles, but training muscles rarely fixes movement. Since all of sport is movement, his 80/20 approach is then astounding in its effectiveness. For the time invested, the FMS and its cousins are the best tools I've seen for producing bullet-proof athletes and pain-free non-athletes in record time. --Tim Ferriss, author of the #1 NY Times bestseller, The 4-Hour Workweek Exercise and rehabilitation time is valuable too valuable not to use a system. Preparation is built on a systematic evaluation of everything we can control. This book uses a systematic approach to exercise and rehabilitation built on the fundamentals of authentic human movement. --Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts We have integrated many of Gray's movement principles and corrective strategies into our programs to help accomplish our mission of preserving and maintaining the Commander s combat power. The FMS screening and assessment tools are very useful in establishing the baseline for our performance training system. --Mike Strock, US NAVY, Human Performance Consultant Once a decade comes out a book that you will keep reading, rereading, and crowding with notes until it falls apart. Then you buy a new copy and enthusiastically start over. In the 1990s it was Verkhoshansky and Siff's 'Supertraining.' In the 2000s McGill's 'Ultimate Back.' Enter the 2010s and Cook's 'Movement.' It is a game changer. --Pavel Tsatsouline, author of Enter the Kettlebell! --Pavel Tsatsouline, author of Enter the Kettlebell!

Once a decade comes out a book that you will keep reading, rereading, and crowding with notes until it falls apart. Then you buy a new copy and enthusiastically start over. In the 1990s it was Verkhoshansky and Siff's 'Supertraining.' In the 2000s McGill's 'Ultimate Back.' Enter the 2010s and Cook's 'Movement.' It is a game changer. --Pavel Tsatsouline, author of Enter the Kettlebell!

We have integrated many of Gray's movement principles and corrective strategies into our programs to help accomplish our mission of preserving and maintaining the Commander s combat power. The FMS screening and assessment tools are very useful in establishing the baseline for our performance training system. --Mike Strock, US NAVY, Human Performance Consultant

About the Author

Gray Cook, MSPT, OCS, CSCS, is a practicing physical therapist and orthopedic-certified specialist, and is certified as a strength and conditioning specialist, as an Olympic weightlifting coach and as a kettlebell instructor. The founder of Functional Movement Systems, Cook lectures extensively on the concept of movement pattern screening and assessment. His work and ideas are at the forefront of fitness, conditioning, injury prevention and rehabilitation. His first book, Athletic Body in Balance, continues to be a bestseller, and his lecture and workshop instructional DVDs are leaders in the field of rehabilitation and training techniques for therapists, coaches and personal trainers.

More About the Author

Gray Cook, a practicing physical therapist, has spent his entire career refining and developing functional evaluation exercise techniques. He has taken the Functional Movement Screen and his advanced assessment practices and combined them with reactive-based exercises that enhance motor learning. These two components are the pillars of the Reebok Core Training System.

Gray's ability to teach at many different professional levels is the result of his diverse background. He is a board-certified orthopedic clinical specialist with the American Physical Therapy Association. Gray is also a certified strength and conditioning specialist with the National Strength and Conditioning Association. He is a Level I coach with the U. S. Weight Lifting Federation. He combines his clinical skills with over seven years of professional teaching and lecturing experience.

Gray has lectured nationally and internationally in the fields of physical therapy, sports medicine and performance enhancement. He has served as a consultant to numerous universities and professional sports teams in all four major sports. His is author of the new book Athletic Body in Balance which serves as a working example of the unique way Cook looks at assessment, movement, and exercise. He is also the author of numerous text book chapters and articles related to these topics as well.

Gray's consulting is not limited to rehabilitation and sports medicine. He is equally sought after for his advice on conditioning and performance enhancement. Gray currently practices physical therapy in Southwest Virginia and continues to publish and present topics related to rehabilitation and exercise. He is also part of the Perform Better expert consulting faculty and an instructor with the North American Sports Medicine Institute.

Customer Reviews

This was a very informative book.
Justin Holland
So I decided to do something a bit different and give you a perspective of this book and how it has changed the way I practice medicine.
John P. Nickelston
Highly recommend this book as your bible on human movement.
Scott Iardella, MPT, CSCS, CISSN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

94 of 96 people found the following review helpful By John P. Nickelston on October 29, 2010
Format: Hardcover
How does one go about writing a review of a Gray Cook book? I mean really, where do you even start? I have read the book about ten times by now and still wondered where to begin. Staring at a blank page, I kept thinking about the monstrous task of doing it justice. There is so much knowledge packed into these pages it boggles the mind. So I decided to do something a bit different and give you a perspective of this book and how it has changed the way I practice medicine. The application of the principles contained in this book has changed the lives of many people. The real world people I see every day in my clinic. People who have suffered in pain for years now have their quality of life restored because of the applied principles in this book.

`Movement' was a paradigm shift for me as a clinician. Gray opened my eyes to the wonders of human movement and the systems necessary to understanding it. This was the system I had been searching for in determining why people were getting injured, and why their pain syndromes kept returning. People would ask me, `why does my pain keep coming back?', and I never had an answer that made sense to me. That is until I discovered Movement. Here is a summary of my journey through `Movement.'

This introductory chapter sets the stage for the paradigm shift. It's an awakening to understanding human movement. The section on dysfunction, pain and rehabilitation is something to read a hundred times. The mobility and stability rules are powerful enough to change the clinical outcome of almost every client. I never learned this stuff in school. This one chapter taught me more than I had learned reading entire textbooks. Gotta look at the body as a whole. Imagine that?
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46 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Fish on March 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I'd like to begin by saying I am not one to go public with review of a product, I prefer to talk to the source personally with any feedback. While I have done that on a number of levels with Gray, I feel this book - and ultimately, this concept needs more recognition. We come from different backgrounds as strength coaches, athletic trainers and rehabilitation specialists. There have been different colleges and curriculums attended. There have been different motivations from performance based priorities to treatment and injury care. We have taken different paths to eventually get to a point of influencing athletes (professional or amateur, young or old, male or female, injured or healthy, and all sports or recreational activities in between). At the end of the day though, don't we all strive for the same goal...to enhance the quality of movement of the person no matter what group they fall in above? That, in my opinion, is our responsibility as fitness professionals. Let's not clutter the definition, the mission of the personal trainer, coach, rehab specialist, or injury care person is to help your client/athlete experience improved movement that will contribute in a positive way to the experience or success of that sport/hobby.

Having said that, I have designed and implemented thousand of protocols and programs to try to get the most from my athletes over the last 20+ years. I had always wondered early in my career why after 6-8 weeks of strenuous training why my players would begin to hit a plateau just before testing. To cut to the chase, I was unaware of their fundamental movement restrictions and asymmetries that were limiting potential to improve. So in my attempts to keep "pushing" the players to the end, I actually was not helping them...
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78 of 86 people found the following review helpful By J. Primeaux on December 28, 2012
Format: Paperback
Let me first say that I am very much inclined to be sympathetic with Gray Cook's overall message. It speaks to my existing disposition concerning exercise. Here's a brief sum up: Modern fitness culture is guilty of heaping attempts at strength and endurance gains atop dysfunctional movement. This tends to cause compensation in joints and muscles not intended to sustain loads which leads to inefficiency of movement, pain, discomfort, and often injury. A more proper hierarchy for developing physical ability is Mobility->Stability->Strength in basic movement patterns, and on top of this we can support more specific skills.

If you are looking for a technical book, something which will go through a variety of ways to view and interpret the FMS (Functional Movement Screen) along with appropriate corrective exercises, then this book falls short. The detail regarding the screen itself could be better and more concisely expressed as a pamphlet. Likewise, the corrective exercise section is very sparse, particularly considering the size of this book, and primarily is filled up with the repetition of Cook's main ideological explanation. While I was hoping for some solid exercises, he mostly encourages people to 'do what they know' within the very general framework of his idea (Mobility>stability>strength). This is obviously not helpful if you don't actually have a background in physical therapy.

So rather than a technical book, it is a sort of Philosophy of Fitness book, but even this it does poorly. For the first part, Cook is no writer, and this book is best when it is at its driest, clearly explaining the particulars of an exercise or details of the FMS.
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