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  • Howl's Moving Castle (El Increible Castillo Vagabundo) [Import NTSC Region 1 and 4] - In Spanish - Hayao Miyazaki
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Howl's Moving Castle (El Increible Castillo Vagabundo) [Import NTSC Region 1 and 4] - In Spanish - Hayao Miyazaki

969 customer reviews

$12.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 4 left in stock. Sold by DISCO VIVEROS and Fulfilled by Amazon.

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Howl's Moving Castle (El Increible Castillo Vagabundo) [Import NTSC Region 1 and 4] - In Spanish - Hayao Miyazaki + My Neighbor Totoro + Castle in the Sky
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Editorial Reviews

La historia atrapante nos ubica en un país claramente europeo, en una sociedad de principios de siglo y donde la magia es un elemento común de la vida diaria (hay magos, pero no todos son magos, solo unos escogidos) se nos presenta a Sophie, la hermana mayor heredera del negocio de su padre y que por ello está atrapada en una vida solitaria llena de "responsabilidad" sobre todo si se compara con su hermana menor. Todo cambia cuando el brujo Howl aparece en su vida; este brujo tiene fama de "devorar" los corazones de jovencitas, pero el solo hecho que se haya acercado a Sophie unos momentos, trae problemas a la vida de la joven. Aparece una bruja llamada "La bruja de los landes" quien hechiza a Sophie convirtiéndola en una anciana. Sophie debe iniciar un viaje en busca de Howl y su castillo ambulante para poder revertir el hechizo. En este viaje conocerá amigos y "no tan amigos" y también los secretos de Howl y su verdadera personalidad, armando una historia de amor sencilla y al mismo tiempo mágica, llena de valentía frente a los problemas personales, tanto de ella, de Howl, como del mundo en que viven que está en guerra. La pelicula de animacion que se viene, divertida, con un ritmo que no se hace esperar y una hermosa historia de amor en un mundo de magia.

Product Details

  • Directors: Hayao Miyazaki
  • Format: NTSC, Import
  • Language: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Run Time: 119.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (969 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0013D37M6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #208,619 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

301 of 318 people found the following review helpful By Tsuyoshi on April 13, 2005
(In fact 4.5 Stars) Though 'Howl's Moving Castle' ('Hauru-no Ugoku Shiro') may not be Miyazaki's best film, it is still far more enjoyable than many other films, Japanese or American, animated or not. I for one very much enjoyed watching it, and I love the film for its interesting characters and the rich textures of the designs, especially the fantasy world itself where witchcraft and humans' mundane works can be seen side by side. And the titular six-legged castle that really walks among the wilderness is something you never see except in his films.

Miyazaki's new film is based on a book of the same title written by Diana Wynne Jones. The film's story is told from the viewpoint of a 18-year-old girl Sophie, who is working at a milliner's shop every day. But she can hear the sound of bloody battles from the distance, and it is clear that this beautiful country, where witches and wizards live among humans, is going to see another war sooner or later.

But apparently Sophie is still leading an ordianary life until her uneventful routine days are suddenly broken by one accidental meeting with wicked 'Witch of the Waste,' who turns her into an old woman with a curse. Seeking for her place to live, Sophie goes to the wilderness where, the townspeople say, a young wizard named Howl wanders. In fact, Sophie encounters Howl's Moving Castle in the foggy moutainside, and she decides to hop in. There, forbidden to talk about her curse, she starts a new life with young and handsome Howl, who speaks to her kindly like a prince, but at times acts like a spoiled child.

[MIYAZAKI'S LOVE STORY] You will be impressed with many fantastic and colorful images created by Miyazaki.
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114 of 119 people found the following review helpful By Ken on February 5, 2006
Format: DVD
Probably many people find the story confusing. I felt the same thing when I saw it in the theater for the first time! The story seemed arbitrary and I couldn't connect the pieces together. But when I watch it again on the DVD, I realize the movie is probably about one thing: personal freedom.

Howl is a free person. He doesn't has a heart and even his home (which is usually characterized as a stable point in one's life) can move :-) He is disguised as different wizards in different counties, and when Sophie asks him how many identities he has, he said "Enough to guarantee my freedom". When Sophie confronts Suliman, she comments Howl as "selfish and cowardly and unpredictable, but he's straight as an arrow. He only wants to be free." But in Miyazaki's world, nothing is black and white. According to Suliman, Howl's power is too great for a person without heart, and he will eventually becomes a monster (some political figures come to my mind).

Sophie, on the other hand, is bounded by responsibilities. She is young, but her heart is old. She refuses the invitation from her friends and keep working at the hat shop. When her sister asks her "Are you going to spend your life in that shop?" She replies "It meant so much to papa. Besides, I'm the eldest.". Even her sister asks her to "look out for yourself".

When Sophie is turned to an old lady, it actually set her free because the good thing of being old is that one has "so little to lose" She becomes more adventurous and takes control of her life. She is very assertive as being the cleaning lady in Howl's castle and even tames Calcifer to cook her food. For Howl, his turning point comes when he refuses to move his castle anymore (I'll leave it to the reader as why he does that) By the end of movie, he regains his heart.
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213 of 228 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 9, 2005
Verified Purchase
Not a lot of directors would be brave enough to take on a love story between a girl-turned-old-lady and a wizard missing a vital organ. But Oscar-winning Hayao Miyazaki tackles a new fantasy realm in in "Howl's Moving Castle" -- namely, that of fantasy dowager Diana Wynne Jones.

Sophie (Emily Mortimer) is a plain, unhappy young woman working in a milliner's shop -- lightened only slightly by a mysterious wizard who rescues her one day. But then the evil Witch of the Waste (Lauren Bacall) comes into the shop, and casts a spell on her, turning her into an ancient old lady (Jean Simmons). Sophie ends up wandering into the Moving Castle, a chicken-legged chaos machine, and encountering the sexy if childish wizard Howl (Christian Bale), smart-aleck fire demon Calcifur (Billy Crystal), and preteen apprentice Markl (Josh Hutcherson).

Sophie appoints herself the cleaning lady and starts whipping the castle into shape, trying to deal with Howl's temper tantrums and the war brewing all around them, and trying to cure her peculiar curse. But when she runs an errand to a castle in Howl's place, she finds that her new boss has some sinister problems of his own -- including his missing heart, and impending transformation into a monster.

Don't expect much fidelity to the novel; Miyazaki takes plenty of liberties with the story. As a result, it feels more like his story than Jones', with all the earmarks he usually has -- blobby monsters, colorful rural settings, intense anti-war messages, strange machines, and a Jules-Verne atmosphere of Victorian technology. But "Howl's Moving Castle" is very different from the others Miyazaki has done, since he kept the British flavour of the original book.
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