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Moving Millions: How Coyote Capitalism Fuels Global Immigration Hardcover – April 1, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0470423349 ISBN-10: 047042334X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (April 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 047042334X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470423349
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 1.2 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #430,988 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Kaye, a special correspondent for PBS, writes that the American approach to immigration isn't working and suggests ways to change course. He uses the term coyote capitalism, a system of interlocking, dependent relationships, to describe how unauthorized Mexican labor recruiters trade in human cargo and influence migration. He examines how coyotes and various other businesses encourage, support, and benefit from both legal and illegal migration—and how globalization has made it increasingly profitable to do so. He also looks at American economic and trade policies that encourage rather than hinder migration. Kaye provides an insightful glimpse into recruitment agencies and their impact, and offers an astute study of the effects of politics, influence, and alliances on immigration. While a dense read, the book is well worth the effort. Kaye makes a convincing argument and offers, for many readers, a completely new perspective. (Apr.)
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Review

* Kaye, a special correspondent for PBS, writes that the American approach to immigration isn't working and suggests ways to change course. He uses the term ""coyote capitalism,"" a system of interlocking, dependent relationships, to describe how unauthorized Mexican labor recruiters trade in human cargo and influence migration. He examines how coyotes and various other businesses encourage, support, and benefit from both legal and illegal migration—and how globalization has made it increasingly profitable to do so. He also looks at American economic and trade policies that encourage rather than hinder migration. Kaye provides an insightful glimpse into recruitment agencies and their impact, and offers an astute study of the effects of politics, influence, and alliances on immigration. While a dense read, the book is well worth the effort. Kaye makes a convincing argument and offers, for many readers, a completely new perspective. (Apr.) (Publishers Weekly, February 22, 2010)

Years ago, when Jeffrey Kaye and I were both contributors to New West magazine, I happened to interview a Chicano activist who observed that Southern California is
to the Mexican people what Israel is to the Jewish people — a homeland to which they enjoy a right of return. It was (and is) an illuminating and intentionally provocative notion, especially if we recall that the Jewish men, women and children who reached Palestine through the human smuggling operation called the Aliyah Bet were, strictly speaking, illegal aliens.

These observations came to mind as I read Kaye’s timely and compelling new book, “Moving Millions: How Coyote Capitalism Fuels Global Immigration” (Wiley, $27.95). Kaye, perhaps best-known to readers as a longtime correspondent on “PBS NewsHour,” conducted his research around the world, but the book is a uniquely American take on the immigrant experience.  At a moment in history when we are debating the newly enacted “Papers, please” immigration law in Arizona, Kaye reminds us that he is among the 40 percent of all residents of Los Angeles who were born elsewhere.

His family journeyed from Russian-occupied Poland to England to the United States, seeking safety and opportunity and liberty, and he points out that his own origins are a reflection of the “mega-issues” that he studies in “Moving Millions.” “I need to acknowledge not only migrant ancestors and contemporary influences, but Alexander III Alexandrovich and Maurice Harold Macmillan, respectively the Tsar of Russia (1881-1894) and the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1957-1963),” he writes. “If it were not for them, I would not be where I am today. Their policies and actions propelled my family to cross continents and oceans.”

Kaye points out that movement is a basic and enduring fact of human existence. “Humans are a migratory species,” he writes. “To escape problems and to seek out fresh prospects, we’ve been in the process of ‘globalization’ for as many as a hundred thousand years, ever since our ancestral wanderers ventured out of East Africa.”  But it’s also true that the process is accelerating: “The world is experiencing an exodus on a scale never before seen.”

As we have seen in the coverage of the new Arizona law, Americans tend to focus on the legal status of the men, women and children who cross our borders. If they have papers, they are welcomed; if not, they are excluded. (The same cruel logic, of course, was used by the British authorities in Palestine to send refugees back to Europe.) But Kaye argues that “the legal arguments mask a convenient historical amnesia and obscure more fundamental issues.”

The factors that prompt and direct our migratory impulses, as Kaye points out, are complex and deep-rooted.  In “Moving Milli

Customer Reviews

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Any solution to the immigration issue will have to take into account this immutable force.
Dina C. Cramer
The book is a healthy reminder that we are all immigrants in North America including aboriginals if one goes back far enough, as they too came from somewhere else.
C. J. Maule
Jeffrey Kayes' book speaks eloquently of this "circular migration" pattern, and I can see it in my own family history.
R. C. Silveira

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Trixie on May 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Who knew that there was a time when Chinese workers were smuggled into the US pretending to be Mexicans--because Mexicans were welcome while Asians were not? Or that workers now regularly follow the jobs--and corporations like Dell--from Ireland to Poland to wherever the next paycheck is? Every page of this book has another little known but critical fact about immigration and shows that what is happening in the US is just a piece of an international puzzle about the movement of people. But perhaps it is the stories of the people Kaye profiles that most grippingly show how complicated the issue of immigration is. Moving Millions will stay on your mind long after you've finished reading it.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By C. J. Maule on June 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Moving Millions - Coyote Capitalism
June 16, 2010 by cmaule

There is too much and there is not enough immigration are opposing dialogues that summarise the discourse on immigration in Canada. Those favouring immigration stress the humanitarian responsibilities of wealthier societies and the need in Canada's case to address the demographic deficit of an ageing population and falling birth rate. Those opposed argue that immigration aggravates the level of unemployment and causes ethnic conflict when people from different cultures mix with each other and with the founding French, English and aboriginal communities. Similar arguments are heard in other countries especially in Europe and Asia. Turkish migrants to Western Europe face a hostile reception, while Japan has a policy of racial homogeneity which opposes immigration despite its obvious ageing population.

Immigration research is often one-sided. In developed countries, the focus is on its domestic impact with little consideration of the effect which it has on those countries supplying immigrants. When outward migration occurs, the possibility of a brain drain is mentioned but little suggested to mitigate the effects. Developing countries are far more aware of the loss to their economies and the low probability that emigrants will return, although they may send remittances home. In the case of the Philippines, remittances in 2008 were the second largest source of export revenues after electronics. Another ignored consequence is that any benefit from aid is negated when developed countries compete to attract the best and brightest from the aid recipients.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dina C. Cramer on June 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Moving Millions offers a new perspective on the issue of human migration. Kaye makes us realize that the immigration issue, worldwide, not just in the Unites States, is actually much more complicated than it might seem. It lifts us out of the legal/illegal dichotomy and makes us look at the real issue, which is the unstoppable human imperative to go where better economic opportunities can be found. Any solution to the immigration issue will have to take into account this immutable force. This book should help policy-makers and ordinary citizens who are grappling with this timely political issue. Kaye's readable narrative is enhanced by numerous examples from his world-wide travels as a journalist over many years.

Dina Cramer
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More About the Author

Jeffrey Kaye is the author of Moving Millions: How Coyote Capitalism Fuels Global Immigration, published in April 2010 by John Wiley & Sons. A Los Angeles-based freelance journalist, he was a correspondent for the PBS NewsHour, public television's week nightly news program and a contributor to World Report, the public affairs program of HDNet television.

Kaye's abiding interest in immigration is formed in part by his own history. Along with his parents and sister, he himself immigrated to the United States from England in 1963. His grandparents were immigrants to England from Poland. As a journalist he has covered immigration on four continents. And as a resident of El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles de Porciúncula, he has seen the world arrive on his doorstep.

His assignments have taken him to Europe, Latin America, Asia, and North Africa, where he has covered such subjects as gun running, the global economic crisis, immigration, the drug trade, and the treatment of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay. Kaye started reporting for the NewsHour since 1984, covering a wide variety of stories, including urban politics, housing, health care, factory farming, weapons systems, government contracting, predatory lending, and space exploration.

Between 1980 and 1984, Kaye was a reporter and senior producer at KCET-TV (PBS) in Los Angeles. Previously, he worked as a magazine writer, a freelance reporter for National Public Radio, a TV producer, and as a special correspondent for the Washington Post and other publications.

Kaye's reports and documentaries have earned him numerous national and local awards, including a Cine Golden Eagle and seven Los Angeles Emmys. He was born in London and lives in Los Angeles with his wife, a college instructor. They have two daughters.


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