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Moving Mom and Dad: Why, Where, How and When to Help Your Parents Relocate (Lanier Guides Series) Paperback – May 1, 1998

10 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Series: Lanier Guides Series
  • Paperback: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Celestial Arts; 1 edition (March 3, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0890878684
  • ISBN-13: 978-0890878682
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.7 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,958,454 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By rsags@ix.netcom.com on June 25, 1999
I am a professional that works in the healthcare world and found the knowledge presented by the authors to be quality. They know this area--seniors and the angst of moving from a home and habits of years. Reading this first and then making the choices will be a much easier path to take for many people. Our healthcare system is sometimes complex and confusing and to have a resource such as this can help clear things up. There were some excellent tools provided along with good advice. I enjoyed reading it and will keep it as a reference when my husband and I have to think about this for our own parents. I gave my mother the book for her birthday--she loved it!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By C. Clark on September 3, 2001
The book was enjoyable to read, but I think the authors must come from a much higher socioeconomic bracket than I do! I was hoping it could tell me how to ease my father's transition from his home to my home, but it concentrated only on moving to assisted living. And when I found that one of the items on their checklist for assisted living facilities was whether or not it offered horseback riding, I had to howl with laughter! Three meals a day and a place to hang your hat in assisted living costs $2500/month and up. I can't imagine what the places that offer horseback riding (and golf, etc.) charge. One thing I really appreciated about the book, however, was that the authors advised assisted living consumers to make sure that wheelchair users were not segregated from the rest of the assisted living community. I use a wheelchair, and was shocked and appalled at the news that some assisted living communities won't let wheelchair users into the dining room with the other residents because they feel it is "too depressing."
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By joandfski@aol.com on December 4, 1998
Our book club, The Islanders, chose this book to read last month because so many of us are facing the problem of caring for our aging parents. The book is well written and humorous, and full of important information for anyone who is concerned about providing a safe home for their parents. We all agreed that we wished the book touched more on the specific problems of dealing with Alzheimers and dementia, since many of our parents will be faced with these problems eventually. Also, the authors mentioned nursing home insurance, but didn't recommend any particular policy or company. There are so many confusing come-ons in the marketplace, that it would have been a great help if there was some information on comparing and evaluating policies. We felt we learned a lot about what we will be facing in caring for our parents, but would love to read more about insurance policies to cover nursing home services.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By goodmourningliz@sfo.com on March 21, 1998
This book was incredibly helpful to our family as we struggled to come to grips with our father who was suffering from the effects of a stroke
The authors outline, in an easy-to-read-format, the steps families need to take to find, visit and formalize the details of a nursing home or retirerment community
Humorous anecdotes and stories are interwoven throughout this approachable book
I loved the suggestions for alternatives such as contacting your alumnae office - but wish they had addressed the needs of low-income seniors more
Delightful illustrations and thorough checklists
This book doesn't skirt issues about family squabbles - there are plenty of examples with ideas of how siblings can approach their parents about such sticky issues as "should our parents discuss their funeral plans with us before they die?"
One of the chapters, titled "Help!I Can Hardly Cope With My Own Life and Now My Parents are Falling Apart!" touches on some very sensitive areas, but gives concrete pointers such as when your parents hear of their friends dying, bring up the subject and offer to take them to the funeral.
9 times out of 10, the parent initiates the discussion - what he or she liked and didn't like about the funeral - and you can keep the conversation going.
Overall, a must-read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 2, 1998
This book is certainly a practical how-to manual on a subject, that would be all to easy to not consider. However, when the inevitable reality intrudes,this book allows you to begin to address an uncomfortable subject; in a very non-threatening, calm, and clear fasahion.While it is probably worth its purchase alone for its organizational approach and practical check lists. Its humor, warmth and a sense of the authors passion for thier subject matter made it for me, priceless.As an individual, who recalls only yesterday it seems, requesting the family car with some trepidation; hoping to cage a free tank of gas and not be given a curfew .The prospect of again asking for the keys, for an entirely diffrent reason was very disheartning. At least now I have some sense on how to approach these subjects with everyones dignity intact, and the continued respect of my parents. Additionaly, this book will have you consideringhow you will avoid all of these complications with your own family, when you become the subjects in the books title.
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