Moving Straight Ahead: Linear Relationships (Connected Mathematics 2, Grade 7)

16 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0131656420
ISBN-10: 0131656422
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Moving Straight Ahead: Linear Relationships (Connected Mathematics 2, Grade 7) + Comparing And Scaling: Ratio, Proportion and Percent (Connected Mathematics 2, Grade 7) + Filling and Wrapping: Three-Dinemsional Measurement (Connected Mathematics 2, Grade 7)
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Product Details

  • Series: Connected Mathematics 2
  • Paperback: 103 pages
  • Publisher: PRENTICE HALL (2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0131656422
  • ISBN-13: 978-0131656420
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.2 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #671,789 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Fauxfyr on November 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
The whole concept of Connected Math is to NOT teach the children how to do math. The concept is to get them to figure it out their own way. The problem with this is if the child has no concept of anyway to do the problem, they either get to ask the teacher, who just asks them more questions, or blend into the floor an pretend to not be there. The average child chooses B, since they don't want to look like they are clueless. Then they come home with the homework, where mom/dad/grandma/grandpa whomever actually tells them what they are trying to learn and why it would mater in their life. Enter parental unit who actually looks at the problems and is appalled at the incorrectly printed sheets, "soft" math concepts ("Estimate about how much of this nebulous object could you possibly use for some non-descript project. Give your answer in the correct Units." The correct units are nowhere to be found on the paper, BTW), and homework sheets that come home that do not match the student edition at school. Anyone with a child with learning differences (especially reading or writing) is in real trouble.

The concept is good: use real life applications to teach math, and allow children to discover things in their own way. The implementation is poor, using "real life" situations that make no sense to a child, and no explanation of what the student is supposed to accomplish, or why. I had to explain to my son why anyone would care about the perimeter and area of a hand if they made gloves. How on Earth would he know? He has never sewn anything in his life! (learning difference includes motor difficulties). It reminded me of the test question where you are supposed to estimate how many people fit in a queen size bed, and the answer from the people who actually slept 5 to a bed was "wrong".
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A. S. Templeton on March 12, 2011
Format: Paperback
The criminally incompetent ex-hippie "professors" Lappan, Fey, Fitzgerald, Susan, and Philips coauthored this abominable "Connected Mathematics" series, which needs a better name like "Math For Morons: If you don't suck at math now, you will when we're finished with you."

Wretched, awful stuff. Real-world people who have to use math--scientists, engineers, CFOs--simply do not think in the muddled, confused way promoted by this series.

Do not use this garbage; if you must, as all the miserable Seattle Public Schools middle schoolers--and their furious parents--have since 2007, then I sympathize, cos it's all I can do to not stick this dreck in the shredder after another dreary evening sitting with my kid puzzling over this cr*p. And more than one Seattle math teacher is angry over having to push this curriculum.

Same goes for the rest of the Connected Mathematics series like Variables and Patterns: Introducing Algebra (Connected Mathematics) etc. Just say no!

Before your kid's brains leak out her ears from Connected Mathematics, order here the classic old-school Algebra text Elementary Algebra by Hal Jacobs--really fine, and a needed antidote to CM garbage.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By CD44 on December 18, 2009
Format: Paperback
I am a teacher who teaches from these books, and I have to agree with many of the parents who review these books. Parents are not the only ones who are disgusted with these books. Teachers and administrations are also fed up with "Disconnected Math". The book's lobbyists are just too good, and school boards don't know any better, so we're forced to use these books.

In my class, i always prepare a set of lessons to teach my students the skills they need just to tackle the books themselves. The books just becomes one of many resources that i use in class. Perfect example of this: The book Variables and Patterns starts off by asking students about independent and dependent variables, and coordinates, without actually telling the students what those words mean. Luckily, I teach my students what they need to know before we even open these books, so the chapters just become "enrichment" activities or a chance for the students to work in cooperative groups (some of the activities make for some great, creative posters that i use to decorate the room and the halls).

Parents, if you are loud enough, we CAN get these books dropped from math curricula. Your kids are depending on you.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "mothergoose70" on September 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
These series have not examples to follow, no parent helps. No other books are taken home to show how to work the problems! Unless you (an adult) have extensive algebra training, forget this series.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By H. Schmellenkamp on September 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
This whole curriculum is the worst I have seen in years. How can you teach someone math if you just give them a workbook full of problems? Maybe a text book with instruction along with a few solved problems as examples would help.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Casual A.I Viewer on January 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
The Connected Math series is utterly useless. My 13 yr old for the first time, now hates math. The title of the series is a joke, my son feels very disconnected to the concepts. As a parent, I find it difficult to understand, the language is terrible. Our public schools our using them & the teachers hate it. ( The one star is because Amazon makes you give at least one.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Thomas M. Johnson on November 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
The first person is right this book does nothing for the parents,there is no way you can figure out what is going on unless you have had algebra before, no examples no help what so ever.
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Moving Straight Ahead: Linear Relationships (Connected Mathematics 2, Grade 7)
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