Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 2 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Good readable copy. Worn edges and covers and may have small creases. Otherwise item is in good condition. Has some underlined pages, otherwise, this book is in very good condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs, and Declarations of Independence Paperback – June 27, 1996


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, June 27, 1996
$16.00
$2.95 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs, and Declarations of Independence + No Pity: People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement
Price for both: $29.93

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; Reprint edition (June 27, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786881623
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786881628
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #322,513 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

ABC correspondent Hockenberry, who was left a paraplegic after a 1976 car accident, writes of living life from a wheelchair.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The former National Public Radio correspondent, currently seen on ABC's Day One, explains what it's like to report from such embattled outposts as Jerusalem, Baghdad, and New York City in a wheelchair.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
39
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 44 customer reviews
Read this book almost ten years ago.
Star of DBB -
Thank you to JH for sharing his most intimate and challenging experiences to help others understand.
S. H. Abrams Consulting
It is a story of great determination, creativity, good humor, and profound intelligence.
Imelda The Hon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Craig_C on April 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
Upon my discharge from rehab after becoming a paraplegic myself, there was a long list of recommended books and a stack of books that had been given to me by well intending friends and family. These books were sterile and had been written by walking people. This book is a fantastic departure from the clinical spinal cord injury books. This book helped prepare me in a very different way than the help I received from family, friends, doctors or therapists for some of the wide variety of challenges I now face in daily living. This book is simply a must read for new paraplegics and their families.
Honestly, I would prioritize this over the books from Christopher Reeve.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 7, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I want to keep my review short because, if you have not read this book, reading my review will take up some of the time in which you could be reading the real book. When "Moving Violations" was first published, I heard a review of it on NPR. John Hockenberry is an NPR alum so I expected the book to be almost as good as the review led me to believe. I ordered it from Amazon and devoured it in almost no time. It was actually better than the radio review had led me to expect. A month later, I got a call from Seattle that delivered horrific news. My 21-year-old son had been in a contest with gravity and gravity had won. Although he had just had 18 hours of surgery, there was no way to know if he would ever walk again. Through the years since that time, I have read "Moving Violations" many times. It initially gave me entrance to a new world and was much more helpful to both my son and I than all the rehab publications combined. I knew, from the moment I answered that phone call that both my son and I had crossed into the Twilight Zone and nothing would ever be the same again. The Twilight Zone, however, had at least one map. My son's journey was, and continues to be, unique (as all such journeys are). I did feel, from the very beginning, that we had a preview of some of the directional signposts and even some of the scenic overlooks. I cannot help but think that our family has been living and learning about this new life in a richer way than would never have been possible if we had not read this book. As soon as my son came home from rehab it became clear that he had lost his will to live. I had a captive audience and started reading "M V" aloud. It is well written and mirrors many of the dilemmas in the life of a young male with spinal cord damage.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book contains the memoirs of John Hockenberry, a well-known journalist who is disabled. Hockenberry takes us through a blow-by-blow account of the accident which left him paralyzed from the chest down. He explains the nature and extent of his injuries and describes his experiences in the rehab hospital where he learned how to manage the needs of daily life from his wheelchair. He then takes us through the details of his young adult years, his education, marriage, and career. The only aspect of the book that I did not like was that Hockenberry occasionally gets a little heavy-handed with philosophizing. The extensive self-analysis, however is understandable, since this is very much a book about coming to terms with his life-to-date and his culture.

It was the 1980 eruptions at Mt. St. Helens that got Hockenberry his big break with NPR. Hockenberry was covering the reports for a local radio station in Eugene, Oregon, where he was living at the time, and his reports drew the attention of the national NPR news editors. They never suspected that their intrepid Oregonian journalist was in a wheelchair until the day he was not able to phone in a report before the deadline because he couldn't locate an accessible phone. NPR found that Hockenberry was quite talented at finding, writing, and reading news stories, and brought him to their headquarters in D.C. Later, Hockenberry was chosen to be the Middle East correspondent for NPR, stationed in Jerusalem. It was there, far from home and the Americans with Disabilities Act legislation, where Hockenberry faced tremendous challenges that taught him much about the human family.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Star of DBB - on February 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
Read this book almost ten years ago. Still can't stop thinking about it. Did all this really happen? Is it happening still? Funny, sad, courageous, all of that, and more than that. Poetic, quixotic... almost other-worldly. Spun from the mind of a visionary, a comic, a journalist, with voice as warm as maple-syrup, familiar and self-deprecating, surely in this account we know what it's like to be Hockenberry, as certainly as he lets us know what it's like to be anyone else he writes about, talks about, covers with an excellence and professionalism rarely matched in journalism, and the chip on his shoulder which still gets him the job he wants, the location he wants, and then run out of town on a rail, that is, after they run him into town on a rail. The 1990 ADA cuts both ways, this book will stay with you, long after the prosaic rocks skips and eddies endlessly on a modern day Walden Pond, that is one man's life... on wheelies.

If you read only one book this year, make it this one, and

be sure to laugh with the author, in all the right places.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?