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Moving Zen: Karate As a Way to Gentleness Paperback – April 1, 1982


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 151 pages
  • Publisher: Quill; 1st Quill ed edition (April 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688011810
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688011819
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,491,509 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

WHO IS C.W.NICOL?

Known as 'Nic' by his friends, C.W. Nicol was born in Wales and went to school in Cheltenham, England. He left on the first of fifteen arctic expeditions at the age of seventeen. One of his school chums was Brian Jones, formerly of The Rolling Stones. Nic is a Japanese citizen and for the last thirty-three years has lived in the Japan Alps. He tells the most incredible and often outrageous stories...leaving home for an arctic expedition at the age of seventeen being one of them. He over-wintered on Devon Island, sleeping in an igloo that he built himself, and shot two invading polar bears at point blank range, after which he and his comrades ate them. He was one of Britain's youngest professional wrestlers. Came to Japan for the first time in 1962 to learn martial arts and gained fifth dan in Shotokan style Karate, (honourable 7th. dan). Established a mountain national park in Ethiopia, chasing bandits and poachers. Sailed aboard many whaling ships as an observer, including joining the Japanese whaling fleet to the Antarctic. He was a partner of a two-man stand up comedy team, appearing on stage and television in Japan. Has published over a hundred and twenty books. Released two CDs of songs with Toshiba EMI and held his own concert in the Budokan. Has presented hundreds of Japanese television documentaries. Helped establish a college to train park rangers and people involved in eco-tourism and environmental assessment. For the last three decades has been restoring a beautiful woodland in the Japan Alps, creating a woodland trust which has been granted UNESCO Japan 'Heritage of the Future' status. Has made fine single cask malt whisky, legally, with the Nikka Company. He is extremely well-known all over Japan and has been invited to tea by the Emperor and Empress. Prince Charles came to visit Nic's woodland in 2009. His woodland trust is helping an elementary school destroyed in the 2011 earthquake and tsunami to relocate to wooded hills, and the school will be constructed of wood, with acres of woodland to be a nature classroom.
Wild tales for sure, but they all check out, that is, at least, the stories that he has put in print or admitted to in public. His friends all know that he loves to drink, sing and tell stories, and that he also delights in cooking for his friends, which is why he had his own weekly cooking program for a year on Japanese television. But those are more stories...Some folk call him 'red devil' but he claims that his ruddiness is caused by delicate Celtic skin, not by a love for Japanese shochu and good whisky.

To us, he's just 'Old Nic.'

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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This is a must read for any Karate-Ka person.
PLS
This book is a classic, and is the one that all other martial arts autobiographies are measured against.
Robert Jacob
I've purchased several copies of this book and read it several times.
DonWall@aol.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By DonWall@aol.com on August 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I've purchased several copies of this book and read it several times. It has also been required reading for my Shotokan karate students for years. The insights of Nicol of his experiences in Japan, training under karate legends Masatoshi Nakayama Sensei and Hirokazu Kanazawa Sensei, are priceless. What an absolute shame this classic work is now out of print.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By David Smith on June 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
Nicole Sensei writes about his experiences in Japan starting from his arivel in 1962 to learn Karate and Judo. This book has inspired me to continue my training in Shotokan Karate even though I don't curently have enough money to go to a dojo. He also speaks about the little yet important ocurences that had inspired him to continue on with his dreams. One day i wish to have similar experiences and maybe met the man who wrote such an inspiring novel.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sophia VINE VOICE on August 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
In "Moving Zen," C.W. Nicol recounts his time spent in Japan learning karate shortly after World War II. His simple, excellent prose, the story of his progression as he begins to learn the art, and his and his wife's lives in Japan make for very interesting reading. A very good, inspirational book about the martial arts.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Antonio Bustillo on December 29, 2001
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading the book 'Moving Zen' for the second time. I had read it years ago, aoubd the late 70's, and I liked it back then. I can relate to many of the stories Mr. Nicol relates. Originally , I had trained in the Kenkojuku Shotokan--it is different than the JKA shotokan mentioned in the book.-- and since my training has changed to the modern approach of mixed-martial arts type training. Nonetheless, I still enjoy Nicol's book. If you want to get an insider's look to what it was like training in the JKA, and in Japan... it is a must read.
osu,
A. Bustillo
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert Jacob on September 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
I have read this book probably about a half dozen times. Sadly it was out of print for a long time, but recently came back in to print with a new subtitle "One Man's Journey to the Heart of Karate". I never understood why it was out of print at all. This book is a classic, and is the one that all other martial arts autobiographies are measured against. And I should know because I have read them all (check out my book Martial Arts Biographies-An Annotated Bibliography if you don't believe me). This book is referenced in countless indexes of other books. It really gives a great history of karate in Japan during the 60s. Nicol describes living with other martial artists from the west such as Donn Draeger. If you haven't read it, I strongly urge you to pick up a copy, and read it today.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Pellitteri on January 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is very inspirational. It is a story of CW Nicol's karate training and every time I read it, it re-inspires me to train. If you ever find a copy, grab it!
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Format: Hardcover
C.W. Nicol, a "Martial Scholar" with few equals. Moving Zen is a story of one persons training experience(s) in the Japanese-Okinawan Martial Art of Kara-te, the Way of the Empty Hand. This book describes, with a razor sharp and pristine clarity, not the techniques of martial arts, but rather the soul of them, in Post WWII Japan. Where others have "attempted" conveying these experiences, in the 25 years since Nicol wrote it, NONE have done it, even half as well. Devistatingly potent, and a h-i-g-h-l-y "moving" book !!!!!If there were merely three books in a martial artist's library, clearly this book, should be two of them!
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By Ray Strodl on September 28, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I first read this book when I was moving through my senior Kyu grades and the story mirrored my own experiences in the martial arts and my own journey towards Shodan.

This book gives a wonderful insight into the journey that is training in traditional martial arts and I can recommend this book to any one who would like a glimpse into the world of martial arts and the modern warriors who inhabit this world.

It is a well written account by an author who clearly lived the way of the empty hand and is able to share it truthfully and eloquently.
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