Prime Music
Buy Used
$0.39
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Round3
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Shipped next day from GA, United States. All products are inspected and playing quality guaranteed (excluding any digital content). Our friendly multilingual customer service team will be happy to resolve your queries.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.30
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Mozart: Piano Concertos 26 & 27
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Mozart: Piano Concertos 26 & 27


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, October 25, 1990
"Please retry"
$29.97 $0.39

Product Details

  • Performer: Mitsuko Uchida
  • Orchestra: English Chamber Orchestra
  • Conductor: Jeffrey Tate
  • Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Philips
  • ASIN: B0000040ZH
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #218,197 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Piano Concerto No.26 in D, K.537 (Coronation): 1. Allegro
2. Piano Concerto No.26 in D, K.537 (Coronation): 2. Larghetto
3. Piano Concerto No.26 in D, K.537 (Coronation): 3. Allegretto
4. Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595: 1. Allegro
5. Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595: 2. Larghetto
6. Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595: 3. Allegro

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Smith on February 3, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Uchida's success in divining the manifold subtleties of Mozart's piano sonatas, and showing the listener how much expression was really embedded in them all, was one of the all time great achievements of twentieth century pianism. For me, this tradition continues into the more plainly evident delights of these two concertos. Critics say that 26 is the dud among the glories of concertos 20-27, but you wouldn't know it listening to Uchida's interpretation. Mozart never wrote out the piano part for 26 in its entirety, and Uchida offers a few interesting and successful variations on the "official" score. The gentle melancholy of 27 seems made for Uchida's spiritualized reading of Mozart, and the slow movement will just break your heart. Absolutely stunning. Tate does a fine job with the ECO, and although the sense of dialogue that often shines through in the interpretations of pianist/conductors such as Perahia, Barenboim and Ashkenazy seems missing, it doesn't seem as important with these two concertos as it does with some of the others. There are so many fine recordings of these concertos out there (I especially like Ashkenazy) that you have to expect perfection, and this Uchida/Tate collaboration comes as close as I can imagine to that elusive state.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By George S. DECONTE II on August 5, 2012
Format: Audio CD
I'm an Uchida fan, but her performance of Piano Concerto No.26 K.537 is one of those I don't care for. The first two movements are uninspired and going-through-the motions. And-dare I say it?-did I hear a few wrong-sounding notes in the first movement? I played piano before, and I always played lots of wrong notes; so I quit. And when I heard Wilhelm Kempff, her teacher, play the Schubert piano sonatas on records, even more so-I could never sound like that. So I was surprised to hear Uchida play a few wrong-sounding notes on a recording. Well, a little added dissonance won't hurt.
She's more alive in the last movement. The last Concerto sounds beautiful, but tame. But I still played it over, again. If you're a fan of hers like me, I'll try to get every thing she plays.
I almost forgot: the individual CD Mozart\Uchida Piano Concertos are the only times I see Philips name their wonderful engineers.
For me it's a natural miracle, musicians can play without making a mistake. And I don't hear pages turning in recordings; so does that mean the soloist must memorize his or her part, like preparing for a concert? Wow!
Thanks, again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category