Mozart, W.A.: String Quartets K. 458 "Hunt"; K. 465 "Dissonance" / Haydn, J.: String Quartet, Op.76 No.3 "Emperor"

November 17, 1997 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
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Popularity  
30
1
8:22
30
2
4:05
30
3
7:05
30
4
6:06
30
5
10:30
30
6
7:37
30
7
4:40
30
8
5:21
30
9
6:55
30
10
6:33
30
11
4:35
30
12
5:28


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 17, 1997
  • Release Date: November 17, 1997
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:17:17
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000V6S8AW
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #213,426 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Leonardo on March 2, 2006
Format: Audio CD
First, I copy and paste Grammophone`s review as a point of departure, later I add my impressions:

"It's a little disappointing to see the Emerson following their brilliant Gramophone Award-winning Bartok cycle with a collection of such obvious 'favourites', still more so to discover that the end product isn't quite the same resounding success. The playing is, of course, brilliant; having chosen bracing (though not break-neck) speeds for the finale of K465 and for the first and last movements of K458, they proceed to articulate with remarkable clarity, and the way the voices bounce off one another in K465's first movement development section makes for exhilarating listening. After this, their competitors sound over-fastidious or simply under-powered-though on Teldec/ASV the Alban Berg's sureness and concentration remain impressive.

Even so, one of my strongest impressions is of contrast too sharply defined. Nothing in Mozart's dynamic grading is missed, but the punchy accents aren't always as thrilling as they're plainly meant to be: whether the recording is too intimate for this kind of up-front approach I'm not sure, but as I reached the final item on the disc-the finale of the Emperor-my impression had switched decisively from 'exuberant' to 'hectoring'.

Final feelings are mixed. I admire the lack of stately reserve in the minuets, and one can't fail to be impressed by the combination of crispness ardour and tight control in all fast movements. Where the performances fail most often, it seems to me, is in the slow music. Philip Setzer's carefully engineered transition from piano, senza vibrato to a throbbing forte in the opening phrase of the Dissonance introduction smacks of contrivance, as does the expressive underlining in the Adagio of the Hunt.
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