Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 
Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

Watch it Instantly
Includes the Amazon Instant Video version at no extra charge. (Learn more)
Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
$11.39 + $3.99 shipping
Sold by goHastings.

or
 
   
Sell Us Your Item
For up to a $1.45 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Fulfillment Express US Add to Cart
$22.02  & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Mozart's Sister (+ Audio-CD) (2011)

Marie Feret , Marc Barbe , Rene Feret  |  Unrated |  DVD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)

List Price: $29.95
Price: $17.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $11.97 (40%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, Sept. 3? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
 
 
Buy This DVD and Watch it Instantly
Watch the Amazon Instant Video version on your PC, Mac, compatible TV or compatible device at no charge when you buy this DVD from Amazon.com. The Amazon Instant Video version will be available in Your Video Library and is provided as a gift with disc purchase. Available to US customers only. See Terms and Conditions.
 
 
Deal of the Week: 57% Off "Clint Eastwood: 40 Film Collection"
This week only, save 57% on "Clint Eastwood: 40 Film Collection." This series features 38 feature films and two new documentaries. The offer to own this complete series ends September 6, 2014, 11:59 pm PST. Shop now

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Mozart's Sister (+ Audio-CD) + Young Goethe in Love + Mysteries of Lisbon
Price for all three: $55.37

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Marie Feret, Marc Barbe, Clovis Fouin, David Moreau
  • Directors: Rene Feret
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Music Box Films
  • DVD Release Date: February 14, 2012
  • Run Time: 120 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B005ZMBDJU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #135,148 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features


- Includes a soundtrack CD with original music from the film composed by Marie-Jeanne Serero

Editorial Reviews

Review

BY ROGER EBERT The image that springs to mind is of the young Mozart touring the royal courts of Europe and being feted by crowned heads. He was a prodigy, a celebrity, a star. The reality was not so splendid, and even less so for his sister, Nannerl, who was older by 4½ years and also highly gifted. The family Mozart, headed by the ambitious impresario Leopold and cared for by his wife, traveled the frozen roads of the continent in carriages that jounced and rattled through long nights of broken sleep. Some royalty were happy to keep the Mozarts waiting impatiently for small payments. There was competition from other traveling prodigies none remotely as gifted as Mozart, but how much did some audiences know about music? Toilet facilities were found in the shrubbery along the roads. Still, theirs was largely a happy life, as shown in Rene Feret's Mozart's Sister, a lavishly photographed period biopic that contrasts the family's struggle with the luxuries of its patrons. Papa Mozart (Marc Barbe) was a taskmaster but a doting father. Frau Mozart (Delphine Chuillot) was warm and stable. And this is crucial: Nannerl (Marie Feret) and Wolfgang (David Moreau) loved music. They lived and breathed it. They performed with delight. The great mystery of Mozart's life (and now we must add his sister) is how such great music apparently came so easily. For them, music was not labor but play. One understandably hesitates to say Nannerl was as gifted as her brother. We will never know. She played the violin beautifully, but was discouraged by her father because it was not a woman's instrument. She composed, but was discouraged because that was not woman's work. She found her family role at the harpsichord, as Wolfgang's accompanist. The feminist point is clear to see, but Leopold was not punishing his daughter so much as adapting his family business to the solidly entrenched gender ideas of the time. There's a trenchant conversation late in the film between Nannerl and Princess Louise de France (Lisa Feret), the youngest child of Louis XV. From such different walks of life, they formed almost at first meeting a close, lifelong friendship, and shared a keen awareness of the way their choices were limited by being female. A royal princess who was not close in line to the throne (she was the 10th child), Louise had two career choices: She could marry into royalty or give herself to the church. She entered a cloistered order, and it was her good fortune to accept its restrictions joyfully. But think if we had been males! she says to Nannerl. Each could have ruled in their different spheres of life. Nannerl also has a close relationship with Louise's brother, the Dauphin prince (Clovis Fouin), a young widower. It seems to have been chaste but caring. Nannerl was always required in the wings of her brother's career, and after his death at only 35, she became the guardian of the music and the keeper of the flame. She found contentment in this role, but never self-realization. The movie is an uncommonly knowledgeable portrait of the way musical gifts could lift people of ordinary backgrounds into high circles. We hear Papa in a letter complaining about the humiliations his family experienced by tight-fisted royals (they were kept waiting two weeks as one prince went out hunting). Leopold was a publicist, a promoter, a coach, a producer. It is possible that without him, Mozart's genius might never have become known. The film focuses most closely on Nannerl, a grave-eyed beauty, whose face speaks volumes. She aspires, she dreams, she hopes, but for the most part, she is obedient to the role society has assigned her. Marie Feret, the director's daughter, is luminous in the role. --Roger Ebert RogerEbert.com

Product Description

Written, directed and produced by Ren‚ F‚ret, Mozart's Sister is a re-imagined account of the early life of Maria Anna 'Nannerl' Mozart (played by Marie F‚ret, the director's daughter), five years older than Wolfgang (David Moreau) and a musical prodigy in her own right. Originally the featured performer, Nannerl has given way to Wolfgang as the main attraction, as their strict but loving father Leopold (Marc Barbe) tours his talented offspring in front of the royal courts of pre-French revolution Europe. Approaching marriageable age and now forbidden to play the violin or compose, Nannerl chafes at the limitations imposed on her gender. But a friendship with the son and daughter of Louis XV offers her ways to challenge the established sexual and social order.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
69 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent character study and period piece January 18, 2012
Format:DVD
I had seen the preview of this movie at my local independent movie theatre for quite some time, and had begun to wonder whether the movie would actually come to Cincinnati, but this past weekend the movie finally opened here, and I did not wait long t go see this, as I imagine this will not play very long (and the DVD is coming out soon as well).

"Mozart's Sister" (original title: "Nannerl, La Soeur de Mozart"; 2010 release from France; 120 min.) brings a look in the life of 15 year old Mari Anna (nicknamed Nannerl) Mozart. She is 5 years older than her brother and wunderkind Wolfgang, but Nannerl certainly has certain musical talents as well, in particular in playing the harpsichord. But it is not until after a chance meeting with the recently-widowed Dauphin of France that he encourages her to start developing her own composing talents. Alas, that is not the way her father sees is. There are some further turns and twists but I will let you discover those yourself.

Please note: this movie proceeds at glacial speed, and I mean this as a complement. It reflects, among other things, life in the late 18th century when things simply moved a lot slower and there was not a whole lot to do to entertain one-self. I found it refreshing, to be honest. Also note: if you are not a fan of classical music, you are probably not going to like this movie, as classical music is front-and-center all over. It appears that people in those circles really didn't have a whole lot more to do than to play or listen to classical music. The harpsichord is delightfully featured prominently throughout the movie.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
I loved this movie for reasons stated in above reviews as well: the movie has a beautiful atmosphere that really transports you to that time and that alone makes it well worth viewing. It is one of those rare movies that entraps you and really makes you forget you're watching a movie. The fact that it's about Mozart and his family and features wonderful music played by the two young siblings is the icing on the cake! Lovers of historical accuracy and fact checkers beware - you will find fault. But it is really a beautiful, lovely film that should disappoint no one interested in classical music, Mozart, and the time period. Yes, it does move slowly but again this is truly representative of that time period when things moved at a slower pace, not today's fast paced world - which only helps to immerse you in the experience!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The flame has all but burnt out... July 11, 2012
Format:DVD
While it may not be a popular opinion, I tend to agree with Grace Catledge. I really wanted to love this film. I too enjoy period pieces, and the idea of focusing on the tortured (artistically and societal) childhood of Mozart's eldest sister was very intriguing to me. Granted, there is a lot to praise about this film. The sets are astonishing, as are the costumes (so lavish yet so earthy) and the acting on all counts was genuine and felt organic and yet, as Grace's review points out, this film fell very flat. It just started to meander, not really giving us anything and not really moving in any discernible direction. It felt like a regurgitation of scenes and the fluidity that I felt in the film's outset was all but replaced by a feeling of stagnancy. While I feel that the internal emotions being stirred here are beautiful to draw from (the way that poor Nannerl comes to terms with her own `place' in the family is heartbreaking for the audience to witness) the way in which the film is constructed leaves us waiting for something more to carry us home so-to-speak. No, I was not expecting `Amadeus', but I was expecting to be engulfed in the film and that simply didn't happen. The technical achievements are a dream, as is the classical music played throughout, but there is a passion that is missing here. It is beautiful, sure, but somewhat dead behind the eyes.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
The world may be familiar with the works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era and among the few classical composers that continues to be popular today.

But many do not know that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart who was a music prodigy that played piano and violin at the age of 5, grew up playing as a duo with a musically talented sister named Maria Anna "Nannerl" Mozart.

Unfortunately, we do not hear too much about Nannerl. Reason being is that during that era in time, women, no matter how talented they were musically, were not seen as equals to men. Their status was lower and men thought that women just were not capable of having talent like men, may it be playing music or composing. In fact, women were just seen as housewives, nothing more, nothing less.

In 2010, screenwriter/filmmaker Rene Feret ("Bapteme", "Solemn Communion") wrote a fictional drama based on the life of Maria Anna Mozart.

VIDEO & AUDIO:

It's important to note that I am viewing a DVD screener ala DVR, so I am not going to comment on picture quality. I will say that with a Blu-ray and DVD release of "Mozart's Sister" being released, I recommend going for the Blu-ray version for better picture and audio quality.

With that being said, "Mozart's Sister" is presented in widescreen 1:85:1 and audio in French Dolby Digital 5.1 with English subtitles. The cinematography by Benjamin Echazarreta is very good in capturing close-up scenes of emotion but also the lavish costume and set design featured in the film, but most importantly capturing that look and feel of the 1700's.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Good movie
Good movie, just shows one, the woman has been in the back ground for many years. What a better place this world would have been if women would have had an equal chance, even in... Read more
Published 1 month ago by OKKay
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good Film
This was a very good film and I loved it. I passed on the recommendation to my sister, I thought it was so good.
Published 6 months ago by Jesse Beitz
5.0 out of 5 stars great surprise
I enjoyed this movie and learned something I did not know :) Well worth watching many times. Anyone liking Mozart's music will enjoy this.
Published 8 months ago by L. Hoff
3.0 out of 5 stars Très, très triste
Very sad. That’s my main complaint about this movie; nearly every scene was sad. Others have identified the historical inaccuracies, and these abound and do matter. Read more
Published 8 months ago by George Goldberg
4.0 out of 5 stars Good production values. A "good read" type film.
High quality producdtion values, magnificent costumes, settings and interesting script. Good acting as well. Read more
Published 8 months ago by Alan F. Stacy
5.0 out of 5 stars What a movie!
To remind you of how far we've come as women!
To think that it was normal (and expected) to forbid so many talented women to write music, to perform in concert, to be sexually... Read more
Published 12 months ago by BrigitteL
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful!
Very interesting insight in to W.A. Mozart's life and that of his sister's as well as the life and fate of women composers.
Beautifully made, intelligent, sensitive. Read more
Published 13 months ago by Devvora Papatheodorou
4.0 out of 5 stars Amadeus, the Feminst version --alluring French film
This French production is the fictionalized biography of Maria Anna (Nannerl) Mozart, Wolfgang's older sister. Read more
Published 14 months ago by Joanna Daneman
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining enough, but I could have done without the handheld...
I am no Mozart expert, but I know there are certain things that the Mozart family meticulously documented (through extensive journaling and letters) and certain things that remain... Read more
Published 14 months ago by Kathy-W
5.0 out of 5 stars Supressed Passion
The director Rene Feree did fantastic job by using his doghtors in the film.Beautiful and very absorbing and deep. We loved it. Toshiko Hall
Published 15 months ago by Toshiko Y. Hall
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category