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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon April 28, 2000
I have to admit that I am not Wynton's biggest fan. A fair amount of his music doesn't really do anything for me but this cd is excellent. No matter what I may think of Wynton's "original" music I cannot deny his incredible depth of knowledge and skill in relation to this, the music of Jelly Roll Morton.

No, every song on this cd is not played exactly the way Morton would have played them but what's wrong with that? If you want to hear these songs the way Morton played them you can always buy Morton's own cds (as well as buying this one). And let's be honest, it's not like he has turned these into funk tunes... this is still very VERY Jelly Roll. The heat and humidity of the "blues and swing" on a sticky summer New Orleans day just permeate every song on this cd.

RED HOT PEPPER kicks this cd into gear from the very first note. I feel like I could say something about all fifteen tracks but I won't. I'll just say that Danilo Perez on MAMANITA squeezes every ounce of perfection out of this tune and the crown jewel of this cd, JUNGLE BLUES is for my ears, one of the best tunes in jazz history and the version on this cd is as good as it gets. The first time I heard this cd there were moments (and JUNGLE BLUES being the main moment) where I wanted to just jump up and down and release all the joyful energy this cd radiates.

Whether you're a huge Wynton fan or a huge Wynton critic I still think you could get something great from this cd. Forget about what he says in interviews about free-jazzers (if you like free-jazz, as I do) and just absorb this music. Wynton and this whole band swing from beginning to end and they move through each passage of Morton's music with skill and soul. This is one of Wynton's best albums.

If everything he did was this great I'd be a supporter, as it is though, this is the one that really does it for me.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on January 19, 2000
All jazz is modern, according to Wynton Marsalis. With that thought in mind, Marsalis went into the recording studios earlier this year to record a tribute to one of his idol, the man who he considers to be the first jazz intellectual ever. Indeed, Morton's some of Morton's recording are perhaps the first recorded examples of real jazz composition and arrangement and represent timeless masterpieces of early jazz. Just as importantly, Morton's music was and is New Orleans music as its best. While some tunes on the recording sound incredibly modern (for instance "New Orleans Bump" and certain sections of "The Pearls"), for the most part Marsalis stay true to the form of Morton's music, with emphasis on unified melodic lines, "stop and go" choruses and group improvisations. Morton was of course a brilliant pianist and Marsalis enlist the help of three of his generations leading pianists, Danilo Perez, Eric Reed and Harry Connick, Jr. Masters of traditional jazz like banjoist Donald Vappie and clarinetist Michael White also offer assistance to Marsalis on Mr. Jelly Lord. The recording features fifteen Morton compositions, including many tunes any New Orleanian will find familiar and several of my personal favorites like "Red Hot Pepper," "Deep Creek," and "Tom Cat Blues." Considering the familiarity of these tunes for many, Marsalis is able to put together a collection that can best be described as highly accessible and downright festive. Moreover, Marsalis is as always at his best manipulating the sounds of New Orleans, and especially the majesty of the blues.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on July 19, 2000
I just received this as a present, and I'm on my 3rd listen already. This is Traditional Jazz at it's very best. One reviewer complained that Wynton combined Traditional and Modern Jazz. Frankly, if the Modern is there at all, it's buried so deep that I can't hear it; and I speak as a jazz pianist and composer.
This CD has my highest recommendation
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 11, 2007
I am an audio dealer, manufacturer, and enthusiast and a friend introduced this redbook CD to me. I ended up purchasing 6 or 7 more Wynton Marsalys' Standard Time, Vol. 6: Mr. Jelly Lord CDs. I kept one and sent the others to customers, friends, and industry insiders. The music is exciting and the recording quality is reference level. Depending on one's system, this CD can exhibit a very dynamic, exciting, and very real sense of liveliness. Several others have claimed to use it as one of their reference recordings to demonstrate their system's sonic presentation to customers and associates.

I've since purchased several more of the very talented Wynton Marsalis' CDs and have found nearly equal musical excitement and and engineering in these CDs as well.

One of my favorites and a must have.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on December 9, 1999
People seem to suggest that this album is flawed because it deviates somewhat from the style in which these songs were originally performed. But is that really a flaw? Critics of Mr. Marsalis have often stressed his penchant for tradition. Now I see him being scolded for not being traditional enough. Let's step back for a moment. This album, simply put, is excellent because it is a refined music that is at the same time foot-stomping fun. The arrangements are varied enough to keep the listeners attention throughout. And the playing is superb. The stylistic modernity is merely a sidenote, an observation. It does not add or take away from the great music.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on November 22, 2003
I believe the primary misconception about Wynton's recordings is that they are for the museum. If you look at the span of classical music it covered 300 years plus. Jazz has about 90 some years under its belt. What's my point? We moved way to fast in the realm of Jazz. Wynton's mission is to bring Jazz back under reins and to explore the genres of Jazz we virtually skipped over. This album is absolutely brilliant.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 13, 2001
A few week's ago, I bought one of Marsalis's albums, "Marsalis Plays Monk" At first I hated it. But then, after listening for awhile, I realized the genius of this recording, in Marsalis's arrangement and Monk's brilliant composition, and it grew to be one ofmy favorites. Then, I bought Mr. Jelly Lord. Damn. All I can say is that from the first note of Red Hot Pepper, to the last on the album, it is one of the most astounding recordings I have ever listened to. Simply Mindblowing are my two favorite tracks, "Pearls" and "Jungle Blues" No other Jelly Roll collection comes any where close ot this album. Rock On!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 8, 1999
I've enjoyed all the releases in Wynton Marsalis's 'Swinging into the 21st' series so far, and this one is no exception. Marsalis has covered a lot of ground in this series, both in revisiting the past and exploring new avenues. "Mr. Jelly Lord" is a great collection of music that captures the Jelly Roll sound and the spirit of New Orleans jazz. While perhaps less adventeresome than the tribute to Monk, this is still wonderful music and great fun to listen to. I just purchased this album a few days ago and it has remained in my CD player since that first listen...
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VINE VOICEon December 28, 2013
I LOVE Wynton Marsalis, his is an incredible musician!!! This CD is no exception. It's full of life and history and done as only the Master himself could do it. I think Mr. Marsalis is the most exceptional artist of our time. He doesn't do anything lightly; he brings the full experience to life, including history, culture, age and meaning. Nothing is left out and the result is a musical experience, even on CD, unlike any other.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 22, 1999
At first seeing this album I thought this would be very interesting to hear what Marsalis would do to these songs. The result a great album. The only thing I didn't like was the fact that Marsalis combined New Orleans jazz with Mordern jazz. He should picked on one since the material is Jelly Roll Morton songs he should have stuck with New Orleans Style jazz. though he does mainly stay true to Morton's arrangement 90% of the time. My favorite track is "Black Bottom Stomp" -it's played in a faster tempo. Another highlight is "Tom Cat Blues"-you would really believe it was made in the 20's the kind of stuff Armstrong,Bechet,or Muggsy Spannier would play. another interesting note is Harry Connick Jr. plays solo piano. Performing "Billy Goat Stomp"(I never knew Connick liked Morton's music!)
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