Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Mr. Mojo Risin': Jim Morrison, the Last Holy Fool Hardcover – May, 1991


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$49.99 $3.73
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 157 pages
  • Publisher: St Martins Pr; 1st edition (May 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312059000
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312059002
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 8.8 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,389,724 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Just 15 years before Morrison and his band the Doors set aflame the late 1960s rock scene, Enyalois , an ancient god of destruction described in hermetic scripts, reemerged in academic discussions. According to Rolling Stone contributor Dalton, the mythic Morrison, driven by whiskey demons and acid-laced visions of glory, seemed an avatar of this god whose name, loosely translated, meant "to render unto nothingness." Likewise, Dalton pictures Morrison as the embodiment of a tradition of doomed artists that includes Beat generation poets as well as modernist poets Arthur Rimbaud and Charles Baudelaire. Now 20 years after Morrison's death, Dalton discusses the two most interesting aspects of the so-called "Lizard King's" existence: his varied and lurid influences, and his original intention that the Doors be a performance art-based band. Doors fans will clamor for this original treatment, although Dalton's description of Morrison's demise is ordinary grist for the mill. Another recent book on Morrison is Dylan Jones's Dark Star (LJ 3/1/91).--Ed.
- Lauren Bielski, New York
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Duncan on January 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
With a deft pen Mr. Dalton cuts through the man-made creation that many of us know as Jim Morrison to expose something more truthful. A tragic figure caught in the idealistic and pretentious 60's, trying to use music to transcend, yet ultimately defined and cliched, trapped in his own celebrity. Not always easy to stomach the book paints a picture of the rock scene and the 1960's far and away from the nostalgic musings we hear on the subject today, the picture the author paints is far more sinister. Yet through it all Morrison's music stands as a testament to his genius, and the often dark journey you take with the author serves the necessary task of shattering the creation that is Jim Morrison. When this was accomplished I felt I had an insight into Jim, a deep empathy and closeness that our pop culture seeks to conceal.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "drgroovy" on September 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is one fantastic look at Jim Morrison. It really does give you some insight into the man, myth and legend, without becoming to over-the-top. Not to mention the fact that I learned a lot about other poets that influenced him. Mindful, insightful. It really gives you the blood and guts of the man right in front of your eyes. Go Dave! I wonder what else your have in store for us with other rockers of days gone by.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J from NY VINE VOICE on November 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
"mr. mojo rising" is the best book on jim morrison to date. if you admire morrison and understand who the man was, you will appreciate the non-academic, poetic nature of this book that paints a picture of jim as a creative but also very human and flawed individual who dug his own hole and yet was still a well intentioned, noble young man full of talent and passion as well as self destructiveness and rebelliousness. although at times i was a little annoyed at dalton's slightly excessive cynicism and criticism, as a whole it strikes the balance perfectly between admiration and construtive commentary, giving the intelligent fan an imaginative rush and a glance into the underground literary/pop rock vision that is all too rare in the literature available about jim and the underlying message of his art. ignore dalton's occasionally arrogant dismissal of morrison's attempt to transcend rock and actually change things, and you will find that no other study of morrison is as penetrating into his motives and the inspirations that formed his attitude to authority and oppositional philosophy of life. a passionate study of a somewhat misguided but nonetheless truly great figure, the like of which popular culture will probably never see again. a must.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?