Mr. Standfast (Richard Hannay Book 3) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$16.15
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $3.80 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Mr. Standfast has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mr. Standfast Paperback – February 28, 2007

31 customer reviews

See all 129 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, February 28, 2007
$16.15
$16.15 $24.57
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$60.58

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$16.15 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Mr. Standfast + Greenmantle + The Island of Sheep (Richard Hannay)
Price for all three: $38.09

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Between Kipling and Fleming stands John Buchan, the father of the modern spy thriller' --Christopher Hitchens --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir PC GCMG GCVO CH (26 August 1875 – 11 February 1940) was a Scottish novelist, historian and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada, the 15th since Canadian Confederation. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 390 pages
  • Publisher: Boomer Books (February 28, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 160096964X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600969645
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,045,512 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Joseph W. Smith III on April 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
For those who like good, clean spy-type fun, this is a SUPERLATIVE work. Part three in the adventures of Richard Hannay (which started with Buchan's well-known "Thirty-nine Steps"), this is a first-rate thriller set on the eve of World War I, with plenty of atmosphere and hair-breadth escapes, plus an excellent dogfight climax in the skies over France. Along with everything else, it has some sound theological reflections (the title being a character from "Pilgrim's Progress") about courage and fortitude. Highly recommended.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By John Bonavia VINE VOICE on November 5, 2011
Format: Paperback
Well, here we have the 1918 predecessor to John Le Carré and company, and how different was the "spy thriller" then! Much of the charm of this period piece consists in its evocation of a different world. As the hero, Richard Hannay, dashes about the UK (not that it had that name then) his journeys are mostly by train or on foot, the times of the (frequent and ubiquitous) trains no doubt looked up in the "Bradshaw" that was the bible of travel for every household.

In Switzerland, there is indeed a "great car" which he was happy to see was a Daimler "a type with which I was familiar." So he "lit the lamps, started the engine, and ran it out to the road." "You'll want an overcoat" he was told, but refuses - hardy fellow. And there's a sea trip up the western coast of Scotland, and a spur-of-the-moment air trip (in the observer's seat behind the pilot) with an "aviator" friend - no ATC or formalities in those days.

Above all, notice how unpopulated and quiet the countryside is. Before motorways - even before A and B roads, I think - people moved around much less, in Britain (and in Europe)and there were of course far fewer of them to move. This encouraged Buchan to focus on the beauty of places: I don't think he gets enough credit for his powers of description. Even when France was undergoing the hell of the Great War, he could still pause to note:

"It was calm, bright weather, the long curves of ploughland were beginning to quicken into green, the catkins made a blue mist on the willows by the watercourses, and in the orchards by the red-roofed hamlets the blossom was breaking."

There are many, many other such gems studding the pages of his books.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Losse on July 6, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is my favourite Buchan book of them all! Although not as tightly-plotted as Greenmantle and The Thirty-Nine Steps, its predecessors in the series, it's still a nail-bitingly exciting adventure story sure to have you hooked for most of the first half and the whole second half. In Part One, Hannay spends some time with artistic types very familiar to those of us who enjoy 'lowbrow' fare, and then spends some time in radical political circles in Glasgow. Although it can be slow, there's lashings of satire to keep you chuckling. Then the plot begins to move--through the Scottish Highlands in a sequence akin to The Thirty-Nine Steps, but with far more characterisation and philosophy than the earlier book. During this time, Hannay realises that he's in love, pretends to be drunk, and impersonates a movie director. (No, it's not one of those spy novels with miserable characters and a depressing plot, in case you were wondering.)

The second half, however, is peerless. The stakes rise, the scene shifts to the battlefields of Europe, and the adventure is non-stop. Hannay must outwit a foe far more intelligent and ruthless than himself, try to pick up the courage to propose to lovely, clever young Mary Lamington, and manage to survive a brutal war. The climax is breathtaking and actually has you fearing for the outcome; moreover, it shows that Buchan was not in fact blissfully unaware of the horrors of trench warfare as many people, reading his optimistic work today, would think.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. R. Trtek on December 7, 2012
Format: Paperback
This novel, the third of the five novels in which Richard Hannay plays a direct part, has always struck me as perhaps the most convoluted of the group. Oh, admittedly, there are twists and turns in all of them, but this one seems to lurch about a bit more than its siblings. Still, it's a rousing tale, and if you can put yourself in the time period -- rather like pretending you're a twelve year old in 1934 while reading a Doc Savage novel -- everything will go just fine. Buchan does occasionally reflect some of the ethnic prejudice of the time, but again, you must take that as part of the milieu. Others have sketched out the general outline of the plot, so I won't belabor things by repeating it. Let me just say that the first portion, which is set in Britain, does take a little bit of time to get going, but once it does the intrigue, mystery and danger are in full throttle. The shift in the second half to the Continent and the war that is raging there changes the tone a bit -- there's still danger and intrigue, but the story line perhaps becomes just a shade contrived though still engaging, and in the end -- given the era and the genre we find ourselves in -- everything is resolved with honor but not without loss. Rollicking, compelling and melodramatic-but-in-a-good-way are all good descriptions of this book, and I highly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Mr. Standfast
This item: Mr. Standfast
Price: $16.15
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?