Mr. Tambourine Man

April 30, 1996 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:29
30
2
2:31
30
3
1:57
30
4
2:07
30
5
2:36
30
6
3:30
30
7
2:03
30
8
2:14
30
9
2:23
30
10
2:54
30
11
3:51
30
12
2:07
30
13
2:24
30
14
2:27
30
15
2:23
30
16
2:07
30
17
2:02
30
18
2:11


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 30, 1996
  • Release Date: April 30, 1996
  • Label: Columbia/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 44:16
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00136LUVI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #32,111 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

The vocal harmonies are amazing, the songs are incredibly catchy, and the instrumentation is excellent.
M. Masone
As a band, The Byrds are one of the greatest and certainly one of the most influential bands in rock and roll history.
JWK
During this period the band had one top 10 album (this one) and two top ten singles hits; and that's all she wrote!
Philip Bradshaw

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Lover of the Bayou on May 8, 2008
Format: Audio CD
What a debut! The Byrds only released two albums and a handful of singles with Gene Clark--until a rather abysmal reunion in the early 1970's--but what a couple of albums they are! "Mr. Tambourine Man," their first release, would of course be hailed as one of the penultimate folk-rock records, with the group so aptly adapting the songs of Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger to a radio-friendly audience. Yet, for me, it's not how the group performs the title track, "The Bells of Rhymney," "Spanish Harlem Incident" or even "Chimes of Freedom," but the quality of their original material, the bulk of which was penned by Gene Clark! Clark's amazing "I'll Feel a Whole Lot Better" has become a rock and roll classic, and "Here Without You" beautifully exemplifies its composer's darker, poetic side. Clark and McGuinn, the team that penned The Turtles' "You Showed Me," would co-write "You Won't Have to Cry" (not to be confused with "You Don't Have to Cry" by Crosby, Stills and Nash) and the lesser known "It's No Use." With the success of their first LP under their belts, the group would appear to offer more of the same with "Turn! Turn! Turn!" but Clark would emerge as an even more powerful force with compositions "Set You Free This Time," "She Don't Care About Time" and the hauntingly brilliant "The World Turns All Around Her!" Lesser known track "If You're Gone" would precede Clark's last songwriting credit on a Byrds recording with "Eight Miles High" on their "Fifth Dimension" LP.Read more ›
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Damon Navas-Howard on January 22, 2001
Format: Audio CD
In 1965 The Byrds released "Mr.Tambourine Man", creating a new jangle guitar sound influenced by the words of Bob Dylan. The Byrds transformed folk to a new electric guitar sound including Roger McGuinn's legendary 12-string Rickenbacker. The Byrds still remain one of America's finest rock bands and 'the proof is in the pudding' as Iggy Pop once said.
From the opening chords of "Mr.Tambourine Man", it is apparent that this album is a classic. Even Bob Dylan after he heard The Byrds' recording of "Mr.Tambourine Man" was surprised and didn't record his own version until later. "I'll Feel A Whole Lot Better" was one of the few hits The Byrds had that wasn't written by someone else out of the band. Gene Clark's lyrics "I'll probably feel a whole lot better when you're gone" represents an anti-romantic song that was rarely heard in songwritting in the 60's, it is one of The Byrds strongest singles. "Spanish Harlem Incident"(a Bob Dylan cover) was a good choice as the lyrics show the mystic-folk world of The Byrds. "You Won't Have To Cry" is an early tip off of The Byrds harmonizing vocals. "Here Without You" another great example of Gene Clark's talent at songwritting and singing. "The Bells Of Rhymney" show that Pete Seeger was another strong influence of The Byrds besides Dylan. Pete Seeger adapted the lyrics from a poem by Idris Davis about a coal mining disaster in Wales. The song is very moving and beautifully done, George Harrison said this song inspired his "If I Needed Someone." "All I Really Want To Do" returns as back to another classic Byrds cover of a Dylan song classic. Its a very strong single and always a great listen.
Read more ›
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Peter Durward Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on February 25, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This debut album features Jim (Roger) McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, Chris Hillman and Michael Clarke. The line-up of the Byrds changed regularly but some of these musicians also achieved success with other groups, too numerous to mention here. The style is generally described as folk-rock, but there is more to it than that.
The title track of this album was their first and biggest hit, going all the way to number one on both sides of the Atlantic. The follow-up, All I really want to do, was also a massive hit despite having to compete with a version of the same song by Cher. Both versions of the song made the UK top ten, though the Byrds' version charted higher. The single version of All I really want to do differed from the original album version, but both are included in this set.
The two hits are from the songbook of Bob Dylan, one of the finest songwriters of his generation. The Byrds recorded many of his songs during their career. This album contains two other Dylan songs, Chimes of freedom and Spanish Harlem incident. Don't doubt yourself babe is a song by Jackie De Shannon, another excellent songwriter, who was one of the first music professionals to recognize the Byrds' talent. The bells of Rhymney (about a Welsh mining disaster) is a cover of a song that Pete Seeger based on an Idris Davies poem. The most surprising inclusion is We'll meet again is the signature tune of Dame Vera Lynn, the British forces' sweetheart of World war two. Apparently, the song was featured at the end of the move, Dr Strangelove, and it was this that brought the song to their attention. Gene Clark wrote all the remaining songs here, often with the help of Roger McGuinn.
This was a fine album in its original form. The excellent bonus tracks make it more desirable than ever to anybody who enjoys sixties pop, rock and folk music.
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