Buy Used
$3.61
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: With pride from Motor City. All books guaranteed. Best Service, Best Prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mrs. Bridges' Upstairs, Downstairs Cookery Book Hardcover – April 29, 1975

5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$69.06 $3.61
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 193 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (April 29, 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671220292
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671220297
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #366,960 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Daniel S. Russell on June 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is a lovely little book full of period recipes and great illustrations. However, I find that it omits many food and drink items mentioned in the show -- for instance, simple things like hot posset and barley water or "infamous" foods from the series, such as Mrs. Bridges' ill-fated plum cake with almonds sat on by Gregory Wilmot. Also, I was expecting something that corresponded to the series a bit more closely. I would like to have seen, for instance, a section devoted to the dinner Mrs. Bridges prepared for King Edward VII, with a reproduction of the menu cards from the dinner. Obviously those who created this book simply gathered Edwardian recipes and didn't consult the production designers of the show.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Cindy Merrill on April 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you wish to get a glimpse of everyday life in a typical upper class English Manor during the turn of the 20th century, THIS is the book for you: The recipes are truly authentic, bringing history alive!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Constant Viewer on March 9, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This slim but most interesting volume will appeal to anyone who remembers the ill-tempered Mrs Bridges from the glory days of "Upstairs, Downstairs," or who stands by the TV with a shotgun on Sunday evenings to keep away anybody who might object to "Downton Abbey," or those who may recall the delightful "Duchess of Duke Street." These recipes for dishes that graced the tables of the wealthy and mighty in the early 1900s---the era of all 3 British series---have been updated for modern technology (as it existed in the 1980s anyway), so it's possible for any moderately skillful home cook in 2014 to recreate a banquet that could have been enjoyed by the guests of the Crawleys, the Bellamys or the Bentinck Hotel.

The book was researched, written, and originally published in the UK and follows British practice in giving measurements not in our familiar tablespoons and cups, but by weight. There is a table of equivalents at the front of the book, but it's still worrisome figuring out how many quarter-cups of white flour make up 6 oz. Some measurements are given in old-fashioned ways like "a wineglassful of...." or "a nut of butter," or even the elusively confusing "one dessertspoonful of...". Such terms are, alas, impenetrable for Yanks, accustomed as we are (thanks to Fannie Farmer) to exact amounts rendered in quarter-teaspoons or one-third cups. Some of it has to be rendered by trial-and-error guesswork. After experimentation and discussion, I take "nut of butter" to be a about the size of a walnut and, after seeing a set of antique silver flatware owned by a Canadian friend, determining that "a dessertspoon" is a large tablespoon (of the kind used at the table, not a measuring tablespoon found only in the kitchen).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bonita Stevens on December 15, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I ordered this after watching the entire original series. The recipes are fine, and what I expected. The book itself fell apart in my hands.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
This is the other Upstairs downstairs cookbook. It is different from the other one I just bought. One of them seems to be a facsimile of a book published at the time Upstairs Downstairs takes place.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again