Buy Used
$0.76
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex Library book with usual stamps and stickers. Good Clean Condition Book. Good reading copy. Over 2 Million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items shipped same or next working day from the UK.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Mrs de Winter Paperback – September 3, 2001


See all 28 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.21 $0.76
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$11.99

Far from the Madding Crowd
Far from the Madding Crowd
The strong-minded Bathsheba Everdene—and the devoted shepherd, obsessed farmer and dashing soldier who vie for her favor—move through a beautifully realized late 19th-century countryside, still almost untouched by the encroachment of modern life. Fox Searchlight Pictures will release a movie version of Far from the Madding Crowd May 1st. Learn more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books (September 3, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099284782
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099284789
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.8 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,247,733 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This sequel to Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca depicts the further adventures of Maxim de Winter and his second wife.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

What happened to Maxim de Winter and his second wife after Manderley burned? This suspenseful "completion" of Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca begins with the couple's return to England, following a ten-year, self-imposed exile, for the funeral of Maxim's sister Beatrice. In a voice true to the original story, Hill's Mrs. de Winter chronicles Rebecca's continuing shadow on their life: a mysterious wreath bearing a card with the initial "R" is discovered near Beatrice's grave, and unwelcome visitors include Jack Favell, who has visions of blackmail, and Mrs. Danvers, who seeks revenge. The narrator's happiness with Maxim is threatened by his first wife's invasive presence. Can she protect him from the past, or will Rebecca's murder be avenged? Sure to please du Maurier fans, this is highly recommended for public libraries. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 6/15/93.
- Heather Blenkinsopp, Mercy Coll. Lib., Dobbs Ferry,
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

I wish I have never read this book.
Ha M. Nguyen
What was so disappointing about this book was that we were hoping that the second Mrs. De Winter and Maxim would somehow be happy even after the disaster at Manderly.
MortensOrchid
I found the main character annoying and the end ridiculous.
Kathy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 59 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 30, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I can't think of a single good thing to say about it. It reads like an entry to those one of the Worst Writing contests--it is so bad, it's like a parody of pointlessly melodrama. Mrs. De Winter spent nearly the entire book inside her own head, sharing her thoughts, fears, and aimless existence and it sounded just like this: "I think I knew at once, in an instant, things would never be the same again, they couldn't be the same, not now, not ever, I was a fool to think otherwise, oh WHY didn't I see, why COULDN'T I see, that things were different but forever the same, always the same, they couldn't be otherwise, I know that now, I think I knew that then, but until that instant I didn't believe, didn't want to believe, that for me, things were just as before, exactly as before, forever haunting us, forever coming between us, just as before, unchanged........." Bleah.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mary Beth Keller on June 10, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
My mother introduced me to Rebecca when I was twelve. I've adored the book ever since. I never wanted the book to end, and longed to know what happened to the characters after the tragic fire at Manderly. I was so excited to pick up Mrs. DeWinter. Two chapters into the book, I knew that I had made a dreadful mistake. I felt an obligation to finish the book, and I did. Ms. Hill causes readers to loathe Maxim, to think of him as a boorish lout. The second Mrs. DeWinter reads as flat, neurotic and weak. If I could erase this book from my memory I would. It is a disgrace to the original.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "massachusetts" on January 27, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I couldn't wait for Mrs. De Winter to be available and was not only disappointed, but angered that it was allowed to be published. I have had the pleasure of reading Rebecca at least five times in the past twenty years and was always impressed with the main character's strength and maturity when she finally made her stand. In Mrs. De Winter, the author totally lost sight of this strength of character and expected the reader to accept a weak and frightened child bride again. For anyone who has read the original Rebecca, it is clear that this book (Mrs. De Winter) was published to make money on it's success. Shame on the publisher and the estate of Du Maurier for allowing this. Rebecca is probably one of the best gothic novels this century, it even is pivital in a fairly recent Ken Follett novel of the same title, Rebecca, which I thoroughly enjoyed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Nina M. Osier on September 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
The second Mrs. de Winter narrates this book, as she did Daphne du Maurier's classic REBECCA, to which it professes itself the sequel. She remains otherwise nameless, and through the first half of this novel sounds very much like herself. Author Hill has du Maurier's style down cold, in fact. In that respect I was very pleased.

The novel's second half, on the other hand, kept me reading almost solely for the beauty of the writing. As Maxim de Winter and his second wife make a permanent return to England, after 10 years in voluntary exile, the characters regress alarmingly and infuriatingly. Mrs. de Winter loses all the growth she attained during the first book's events, and during her years in exile. Maxim loses the wonderful complexity that made him such an intriguing hero. Was the point to get rid of the du Maurier book's moral ambiguity? If so, Hill accomplishes this quite nicely. She has her heroine tell us repeatedly that "we make our own destiny," and she sees to it that wrong is punished in proper black-and-white terms. By the time she's through, the characters who seemed so real precisely because they had as many dimensions as flesh-and-blood people have been rendered simple, manageable, understandable...and boring.

Competently written, but overall a huge disappointment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 16, 1997
Format: Hardcover
The nameless narrator of Rebecca chronicles the downs of her marriage with Maxim DeWinter 10 years after the burning of Manderley. The couple have been abroad, leading a nomadic existence, fleeing old ghosts. But the nesting urge is strong in our heroine, and on a visit to England she takes a fancy to an unpretentious country estate. Then, to her chagrin, they're off again, to Istanbul, but for her birthday, Maxim surprises her with the deed to the estate. Back to England, where she potters around the garden and longingly imagines the children she hopes they'll have one day. When the blessed event/s fail to occur, she goes up to London to consult a doctor and there runs into the odious, now dissolute Jack Favell, who still has it in for Maxim.

The plot creaks along, becalmed by long stretches of interior monologue. Mrs. Danvers makes a wooden reappearance, Maxim never demonstrates one likeable, warm or witty moment, the heroine chickens out of multiple opportunities to show some backbone, and by the time tragedy comes at the end few readers will care.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Mark Twain on June 16, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I don't understand why sequels to brilliant novels are written long after the original author's death. They all fail miserably, yet continue to get published. Mrs. DeWinter might very well be the worst of the lot, with no character development, no plot, and absolutely NO point. Nothing is resolved, except the solution of who burned down Manderley, which was better left unknown. Susan Hill rambles on and on about nothing. The book is extremely boring and way OVERLONG and took me weeks to finish. I was so glad to finally be able to put the book away. Fans of Rebecca should not waste their time reading this garbage. Nothing in the book makes sense, from the narrarator's actions to Mrs. Danvers living down the street, to why Maxim has become so annoying and childish. The last page is the only decent one in the book. Save your time and money, this book was better left never being written.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?