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Multiple Intelligences: The Theory In Practice, A Reader Paperback – April 20, 1993

ISBN-13: 978-0465018222 ISBN-10: 046501822X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; 1 edition (April 20, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 046501822X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465018222
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #850,640 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A follow-up to Gardner's Frames of Mind (which is being reissued simultaneously), this collection of mostly academic essays should appeal mainly to education observers concerned with Gardner's innovative theory of multiple intelligences. The theory that there are seven types of intelligence, (linguistic, spatial, musical and so on) is recapped in an accessible talk Gardner gave at Harvard, a more formal paper on the subject, and a technical essay defining such concepts as "giftedness" and "creativity" in the context of his theory. The book's second part includes Gardner's intriguing projection of a school that applies his theories, as well as four very dry analyses of projects that put Gardner's theories into practice. More interesting are Gardner's criticism of formal testing directed at a unitary conception of intelligence, his proposal that college admissions officers examine student projects for evidence of several intelligences and the suggestion that various topics in school can be approached in different ways that track the multiple intelligences. Reader's Subscription, Library of Science and Natural Science Book Club alternates.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The theory of multiple intelligences (MI) was first publicized by Gardner in Frames of Mind ( LJ 10/1/83). The arguments he presented against the prevailing one-dimensional view of intelligence caught the attention of educators who found the application of a universal IQ test troublesome. Here, Gardner attempts to bridge the gap between state-of-the-art advances in cognitive studies and neurosciences and to demonstrate their practical applications in education. He does an admirable job of explaining the revolutionizing effect the complex theory of seven intelligences has had on schooling, also acknowledging that Theodore Sizer's Horace's School ( LJ 1/92) presents a practical proposal closely paralleling his MI theory in its emphasis on individual performance abilities. This is a highly readable and interesting proposal from an innovative and ground-breaking researcher. Excellent references round out the study. For most education collections.
- Arla Lindgren, St. John's Univ., New York
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 48 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 19, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I came to Multiple Intelligences as a parent of two young children seeking to learn more about Howard Gardner's theory. Multiple Intelligences gave me all that and more, and I think that this book would probably be fabulous for people looking for more than I was. I found the beginning and ends of the book very helpful and informative, but the middle was a little too theoretical for my purposes. I kept thinking that it would be more appropriate for an education student or PTA president than a mere curious parent. That being said, the beginning does an excellent job of laying down the groundwork for what MI is and what all the different learning styles are. Gardner also has many interesting things to say about standardized testing, which is particularly timely given the current debate on the usefulness of the SAT. I think MI theory will help any parent striving to get a grip on their children's educational experience. MI theory has you look more at the whole child, rather than one or two particular skills, something I think we parents have known all along. It's just nice to see that this theory is given such weight.
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44 of 49 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 7, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Howard Gardners's exploration of multiple intelligences has the potential to transform our classrooms. It could change the futures of students who have been short-changed with the traditional and limited linguistic/logical view of intelligence. But first, readers have to get past Gardner's lofty presentation of the material. The science is certainly there but it feels like work reading what are some very basic messages. Plus, the fact that portions of this book are reprints of lectures makes for more than a little redundancy. Brilliant messages, Mr. gardner, but a little more interpersonal intelligence on the next book if you please!
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Format: Paperback
"Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice" is a book that I bought in, about 2005 or 2006. I admit the book is somewhat dry. However, I am not a teacher and had realized in the 1970's that the time had come for a reassessment of what we mean when we say 'human intelligence'. It had become obvious that the left half of the brain worked somewhat differently than the right half of the brain and not all human brains worked exactly alike.

One of the ideas to come out of psychological and medical studies was that there might be several tipes of "intelligence" and, perhaps, we should be measuring them differently and, perhaps, each might require different methods of teaching. This book grew from such efforts. Newer insigts on how 'consciousness' works and the continued studies on intelligence are still developing some of these ideas.

However, when I first discovered this book, I was quite happy to see that our concepts of intelligence were evolving. Now, as I said the book is somewhat dry and is not written for a popular audience. However, it delves into important ideas and the beginnings of acting on the theory that we have multiple intelligences. I think we will see a good deal more work before we are completely ready to throw out those old-time IQ tests, but, eventually, we will. Also, this particular area of inquiry may not be the ultimate source of the entirety of that future understanding of our human intelligence.

Meanwhile, this book is for folks who are serious about achieving a better understanding of how our brains and our minds work.
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27 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Lindsay Gonzalez on June 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book was not terrible, but was quite dry. It talked mainly about how teachers should approach teaching students with multiple intelligences. One thing I did like though, was that Gardner described his seven intelligences. This was more of what I was interested in. It gave me something to personally relate to. For teachers, this book would be excellent, but for an ordinary person, I wouldn't recommend it. It's wordy in the middle of the book, but the beginning catches your attention by describing the intelligences. They also give examples of the intelligences. The examples make it easier to understand and possibly relate to.
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By AnaMaria Vergara on February 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Howard Garner is one of my ultimate favorites. This book is excellent and provides many insights. Along this line I also invite you to read How to Think Like Leonardo Da'Vinci, by Michael J. Gelb.
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More About the Author

Howard Gardner is the Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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