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Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter [Kindle Edition]

Liz Wiseman , Greg McKeown
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (138 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $26.99
Kindle Price: $12.74
You Save: $14.25 (53%)
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers

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Book Description

A thought-provoking, accessible, and essential exploration of why some leaders (“Diminishers”) drain capability and intelligence from their teams, while others (“Multipliers”) amplify it to produce better results. Including a foreword by Stephen R. Covey, as well the five key disciplines that turn smart leaders into genius makers, Multipliers is a must-read for everyone from first-time managers to world leaders.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Drawing on interviews with more than 150 executives and on her own experience as a former executive at the Oracle Corporation and the former vice president of Oracle University, Weisman argues that executives fall into two distinct leadership categories: Multipliers and Diminishers. Unsurprisingly, Multipliers turn out to be better leaders: unlike Diminishers—self-centered empire builders who tear employees down—Multipliers attract talent, liberate employees to do their best and step out of their comfort zones, make decisions rather than promoting unproductive debate, and invest in human capital. While spotlights on such Multipliers as Mitt Romney, a Talent Magnet at Bain Capital and beyond, and Steven Spielberg, who fosters an open environment on his film sets, are appealing and instructive, the major points are repetitive. Chapters drag on after descriptions of distinctive Multiplier or Diminisher behavior have been made. The breadth of the material is better suited for a lengthy article than a full business book, and the effort to stretch it into a longer work diminishes the meaningful research. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Why do some genius-level leaders seem to drain intelligence and performance out of the people around them, while others stimulate, motivate, and get so much more out of their work associates? Wiseman labels the former group, people who need to be the smartest person in the room, as diminishers, while the latter are multipliers, people who use their smarts to stimulate and enhance the creativity of the group. Both authors are connected with the Wiseman Group, a leadership research center that advises senior executives and provides workshops and leadership assessments around the world. By analyzing 150 executives across America, Europe, Asia, and Africa, the authors have identified what they consider the five most important disciplines that help managers to think and act more like multipliers, bringing people together, and giving others on the team more freedom, power, and responsibility, which ultimately generates self-worth and satisfaction. The book is a well-organized sytem that could be used as a personal tool or as a workbook for team-development seminars. --David Siegfried

Product Details

  • File Size: 762 KB
  • Print Length: 288 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins e-books; 1 edition (June 15, 2010)
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003M69A4Q
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,435 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
In this book written with Greg McKeown, Liz Wiseman juxtaposes two quite different types of persons whom she characterizes as the "Multiplier" and the "Diminisher." Although she refers to them as leaders, suggesting they have supervisory responsibilities, they could also be direct reports at the management level or workers at the "shop floor" level. Multipliers "extract full capability," their own as well as others', and demonstrate five disciplines: Talent Magnet, Liberator, Challenger, Debate Maker, and Investor. Diminishers underutilize talent and resources, their own as well as others, and also demonstrate five disciplines: Empire Builder, Tyrant, Know-It-All, Decision Maker, and Micro Manager. Wiseman devotes a separate chapter to each of the five Multiplier leadership roles.

Wiseman cites dozens of real-world examples that suggest how almost any organization (regardless of its size or nature) can plan, implement, accelerate, and sustain a human development program that strengthens participants' leadership and management skills that (a) will enable them to multiply the intelligence and capability of the people around them and (b) avoid behaviors that can diminish people's ability and enthusiasm

As Wiseman clearly realizes, people combine some of the best and worst traits of both the Multiplier and Diminisher. Strengths can become weaknesses or vice versa if carried to an extreme. A Talent Magnet, for example, could be especially effective recognizing and attracting high-potentials and then hoard their talents, exploiting them to her or his advantage. A Micro Manager could be especially alert for significant details that others ignore but deny other people's professional development by refusing to delegate tasks to them.
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44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you work with people, you need this book June 18, 2010
Format:Hardcover
As an avid business literature reader, I've grown to adopt a strategy for reading books on marketing, leadership, strategy, and the other host of business topics that we all have to be well versed in to lead people and produce results. Typically, I try to find things to read that are based on research or some kind of rigor around best practices. Also, I read the reviews ahead of time and try to get some idea around what return I will get from my time spent with the topics.

I ask myself things like"

"Is this new thinking, or just a rework of some existing ideas?"

" Am I going to be able to improve myself or my abilities from reading this, or is this just to inform me?"

" Is this based on someone's opinion, or is it grounded in some real research?"

"Do I believe that I will be able to take action and apply what I'm reading when I'm done?"

This work brings all of these questions to the right place. If you have to deal with people as part of your role in whatever you're doing, this book will provoke you to think differently about how you engage with the people around you. You will get a very high return on your time and money spent on this book.
Probably the most fun aspect of it is afterward, tracking all the diminishers in your life. If you look at how these people engage and lead, it becomes a really stark and obvious trait that's really, really easy to spot once you've read this book.
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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Having been an HR VP and a recruiter for the IT industry and a Fortune 500 company I strongly agree with the concepts presented here. It's a short, easy read and the book is well designed. It does not spend a lot of time on theory despite the credentials of the author and the rigorous research that went into it. Instead it provides examples and "How To" in each chapter.

If you enjoy books like Daniel Goldman's "Emotional Intelligence", Howard Gardener's "Multiple Intelligence", Carol Dweck's "Mindset" and subjects like psychometrics, personality type and temperament you will relate well to this book.

Having said that I think the real value of this book and its main aim is how we can improve ourselves; how each of us can be less of a diminisher and more of a multiplier. You WILL recognize yourself and others in this book.

I have one bit of advice if you plan to read this book - take the test first. It is located at [...]
I have taken a LOT of psychometric tests in my time and this one is very new so its easy to game if you have read the book. Take the test, THEN read the book.

I do plan on implementing what I have learned and the implementation strategy they recommend is not onerous.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
By Paul
Format:Hardcover
I've read dozens of business books and books about leadership; I have many years of experience as a manager and an MBA. But here's the thing... I do my best to get out of seminars on management/leadership classes and I'll do anything to avoid reading one more repetitious and unoriginal book about how to be a better manager or leader. So... how did I get to writing a review about: "Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter"?

I'm lucky enough to work for an employer who decided to get Liz Wiseman and Greg McKeown to give a bunch of their managers an accelerated one-day 'multipliers' talk based on their book (before it was published so I read it a few months later). As I've mentioned before I'm a skeptic. Most of this management stuff is repetitious BS and it's all about the authors/presenters talking about what made them the great managers and leaders that they are today. I didn't have much of a choice about attending and as I listened to Greg and Liz speak about their research and present raw unedited video clips about some of the multipliers they were writing about in their book something changed.

They were offering practical advice about how to be not just a better leader but a better person. What's leadership about? It's not about about being better than everybody else on your team - it's about getting the most out of them. That's what this book is about. The examples are concrete and the advice and techniques are down to earth and useful to everyone from a parent to a C-level executive.

There isn't a day that goes by when something from Multipliers doesn't influence what I do and how I lead.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Try being a Multiplier and share the knowledge
A worthwhile book to read.
Published 13 days ago by joy cohen
5.0 out of 5 stars Wouldn't you like to work with smarter people? Be the guy that...
I wanted to know how I could be a better teacher and leader. This answered all my questions. An excellent companion book to "Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of... Read more
Published 23 days ago by Toni M. Jones
4.0 out of 5 stars Must read for middle and upper management
This is a great philosophical change in how to maximize the value of your teams and utilize their strengths together.
Published 25 days ago by Joseph T. Roberts
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book - you’ll be thinking about the concepts presented ...
Great book - you’ll be thinking about the concepts presented in this book long after you read the final pages.
Published 1 month ago by Jennifer Garcia
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for the introspective leader
Like many business concepts there is nothing revolutionary in the leadership attributes identified in this book. They could be classified as "common sense". Read more
Published 1 month ago by William Edmondson
5.0 out of 5 stars You think you are so smart until you read this book and find out that...
You think you are so smart until you read this book and find out that if you think you are so smart, maybe you aren't getting the most our of your employees, co-workers, family... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Kris
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Recommended to get more out of your team
Published 1 month ago by Willem
5.0 out of 5 stars I bought this multiple times so I could have it ...
I bought this multiple times so I could have it to lend to other managers. In this business environment where we are all faced with doing more with fewer resources, managers have... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Anonymous
5.0 out of 5 stars An eye opening book. You won't even realize what ...
An eye opening book. You won't even realize what you've been doing wrong until you read it.
Published 1 month ago by Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 stars sound and practical advice
Overall a very good book that all managers should read. sound and practical advice, but a bit repetitive at times.
Published 2 months ago by Tom Chang
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