Customer Reviews


137 Reviews
5 star:
 (95)
4 star:
 (31)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to increase or diminish human capabilities...including your own
In this book written with Greg McKeown, Liz Wiseman juxtaposes two quite different types of persons whom she characterizes as the "Multiplier" and the "Diminisher." Although she refers to them as leaders, suggesting they have supervisory responsibilities, they could also be direct reports at the management level or workers at the "shop floor" level. Multipliers "extract...
Published on June 15, 2010 by Robert Morris

versus
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is really terrible ....
The issues I have with this book is that there is nothing concrete at all in any of the chapters, it is all soft anecdotal stories that can be interpreted and worked around any way to prove anything.

It's all words, and stories designed almost like it was before the book was even written to appeal to people and make them feel smart and better about themselves...
Published 15 months ago by BruceK


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to increase or diminish human capabilities...including your own, June 15, 2010
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
In this book written with Greg McKeown, Liz Wiseman juxtaposes two quite different types of persons whom she characterizes as the "Multiplier" and the "Diminisher." Although she refers to them as leaders, suggesting they have supervisory responsibilities, they could also be direct reports at the management level or workers at the "shop floor" level. Multipliers "extract full capability," their own as well as others', and demonstrate five disciplines: Talent Magnet, Liberator, Challenger, Debate Maker, and Investor. Diminishers underutilize talent and resources, their own as well as others, and also demonstrate five disciplines: Empire Builder, Tyrant, Know-It-All, Decision Maker, and Micro Manager. Wiseman devotes a separate chapter to each of the five Multiplier leadership roles.

Wiseman cites dozens of real-world examples that suggest how almost any organization (regardless of its size or nature) can plan, implement, accelerate, and sustain a human development program that strengthens participants' leadership and management skills that (a) will enable them to multiply the intelligence and capability of the people around them and (b) avoid behaviors that can diminish people's ability and enthusiasm

As Wiseman clearly realizes, people combine some of the best and worst traits of both the Multiplier and Diminisher. Strengths can become weaknesses or vice versa if carried to an extreme. A Talent Magnet, for example, could be especially effective recognizing and attracting high-potentials and then hoard their talents, exploiting them to her or his advantage. A Micro Manager could be especially alert for significant details that others ignore but deny other people's professional development by refusing to delegate tasks to them. In the healthiest organizations, there are constant efforts to increase (multiply) positive and productive engagement while reducing (diminishing) waste.

In Appendix B, this is one of the FAQs that caught my eye: Are people either Diminishers or Multipliers or are there people in the middle? Here is Wiseman and McKeown's response: "We see the Diminisher-Multiplier model as a continuum with a few people at the extremes and most of us somewhere in between. As people have been introduced to this material, they almost always see some of the Diminisher and some of the Multiplier within themselves. One leader we worked with is illustrative. He was a smart and aware individual who didn't fit the archetype of a Diminisher, and yet when he read the material he could see how he sometimes behaved in a Diminishing manner. While we studied this leadership phenomenon as a contrast, we see the model as a continuum with only a very few people at the polar extremes and the majority of us somewhere in the middle."

Most supervisors need to increase some behaviors (e.g. providing clear explanations of performance expectations and how performance will be measured) and avoid other behaviors (e.g. withholding information others need). The same is true of those whom they supervise. The challenge is to do more of what will add value and less of what diminishes it.

To me, one of the most valuable insights in this book suggests that, especially during the current economic recession/depression/whatever, the total cost of what must be done (in terms of dollars and hours) is probably much less than what would be saved by doing it. According to Wiseman, Multipliers extract so much more from their people that - in effect - they essentially double the workforce at no additional cost. If that isn't doing more with less, I don't know what is.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you work with people, you need this book, June 18, 2010
By 
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
As an avid business literature reader, I've grown to adopt a strategy for reading books on marketing, leadership, strategy, and the other host of business topics that we all have to be well versed in to lead people and produce results. Typically, I try to find things to read that are based on research or some kind of rigor around best practices. Also, I read the reviews ahead of time and try to get some idea around what return I will get from my time spent with the topics.

I ask myself things like"

"Is this new thinking, or just a rework of some existing ideas?"

" Am I going to be able to improve myself or my abilities from reading this, or is this just to inform me?"

" Is this based on someone's opinion, or is it grounded in some real research?"

"Do I believe that I will be able to take action and apply what I'm reading when I'm done?"

This work brings all of these questions to the right place. If you have to deal with people as part of your role in whatever you're doing, this book will provoke you to think differently about how you engage with the people around you. You will get a very high return on your time and money spent on this book.
Probably the most fun aspect of it is afterward, tracking all the diminishers in your life. If you look at how these people engage and lead, it becomes a really stark and obvious trait that's really, really easy to spot once you've read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Simple Ways To Make A Big Change In Your Effectiveness As A Leader, July 17, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
Having been an HR VP and a recruiter for the IT industry and a Fortune 500 company I strongly agree with the concepts presented here. It's a short, easy read and the book is well designed. It does not spend a lot of time on theory despite the credentials of the author and the rigorous research that went into it. Instead it provides examples and "How To" in each chapter.

If you enjoy books like Daniel Goldman's "Emotional Intelligence", Howard Gardener's "Multiple Intelligence", Carol Dweck's "Mindset" and subjects like psychometrics, personality type and temperament you will relate well to this book.

Having said that I think the real value of this book and its main aim is how we can improve ourselves; how each of us can be less of a diminisher and more of a multiplier. You WILL recognize yourself and others in this book.

I have one bit of advice if you plan to read this book - take the test first. It is located at [...]
I have taken a LOT of psychometric tests in my time and this one is very new so its easy to game if you have read the book. Take the test, THEN read the book.

I do plan on implementing what I have learned and the implementation strategy they recommend is not onerous.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life-changing read. Not just another management/leadership book, October 2, 2010
By 
Paul (SF Bay Area, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
I've read dozens of business books and books about leadership; I have many years of experience as a manager and an MBA. But here's the thing... I do my best to get out of seminars on management/leadership classes and I'll do anything to avoid reading one more repetitious and unoriginal book about how to be a better manager or leader. So... how did I get to writing a review about: "Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter"?

I'm lucky enough to work for an employer who decided to get Liz Wiseman and Greg McKeown to give a bunch of their managers an accelerated one-day 'multipliers' talk based on their book (before it was published so I read it a few months later). As I've mentioned before I'm a skeptic. Most of this management stuff is repetitious BS and it's all about the authors/presenters talking about what made them the great managers and leaders that they are today. I didn't have much of a choice about attending and as I listened to Greg and Liz speak about their research and present raw unedited video clips about some of the multipliers they were writing about in their book something changed.

They were offering practical advice about how to be not just a better leader but a better person. What's leadership about? It's not about about being better than everybody else on your team - it's about getting the most out of them. That's what this book is about. The examples are concrete and the advice and techniques are down to earth and useful to everyone from a parent to a C-level executive.

There isn't a day that goes by when something from Multipliers doesn't influence what I do and how I lead. It might be something as simple as thinking before I speak and spending my 'chips' wisely or asking the questions that drive the right behaviour rather than making statements or giving directives. For example, instead of telling your kids that it's time to go bed and that they need to brush their teeth and put their PJs on try asking them what time it is and then follow that up with another question.

One of the exercises we did in the seminar was to pair up to debate a subject and to take turns asking only questions of the other participant. My partner was doing a great job asking questions and he was getting a lot out of me and I was feeling pretty smart and engaged until he slipped up and made a statement. All of a sudden my intelligence shut down and the debate ended.

The book starts with a quote from Bono (of all people) that says it all: "It has been said that after meeting with the great British Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, you left feeling he was the smartest person in the world, but after meeting with his rival Benjamin Disraeli, you left thinking you were the smartest person." Who's the multiplier here? Who's the better leader?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Game Changing Insight, July 27, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
I read a ton of business/leadership/management books, most are "good" some are "great" a few are "game changing" (E-Myth, Effective Executive, Lynchpin). Multipliers fits the "game changing" mold in my humble opinion. I've been leading a handful of different business' as an "accidental diminisher" for over 11 years, with relative success. I've consistently struggled with the concept of getting my team to "own" their responsibilities in their respective organizations. Multipliers has shown me the light, and I can finally understand why I've had such a tough time with building a consistently "responsible" crew. I have a new-found sense of excitement and optimism just knowing that there is a way to get better performances from the "smart" individuals on my team, while at the same time making it more enjoyable for them to perform. Highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Practical Guidance for a Worthy Development Goal, September 5, 2010
By 
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
I'm allergic to business books. One reason is that, in telling us how to succeed in business, I worry that they stray into telling us how to live, what kind of character to develop. The latter, I think, is the domain of ethics. Business books, like anything else, can make a claim to discuss ethics, but I think they should be above-board in doing so, and confront objections from dimensions of life other than business. And I think we should resist cultural tendencies to conflate success in business with success as a person, or being a "good" person.

All that said, the reason I was drawn to this book was that it sounded like it appealed to my own ethical choices. I want to be a "multiplier". I want to be the kind of person who respects and enables the autonomous creativity of others. If I'm ever the smartest person in the room, I want someone else to get smarter, real quick.

What this book does is break down that idea of a "multiplier" into five different virtues or "disciplines" -- talent magnet, liberator, challenger, debate maker, and investor. Not everyone is going to be good or great at each one -- in fact, the authors' research indicates that more effective multipliers excel at up to three of those disciplines, not all five. They tell stories of hero multipliers to illustrate each, and they abstract out guidance on how to develop yourself in each of the five areas.

Overall, I think it's a good practical book, not just on leadership, but on self-development.

One odd thought -- books like this are written to help "leaders" develop their "leadership" skills. Not everybody is a leader, in a hierarchical sense. And the hierarchy is bigger at the bottom. But everyone should be a "multiplier", shouldn't they? How would this be written differently, if written from that perspective? How does a good team member make the team smarter? I think, in much the same ways as "leaders" do. But I guess the book market is made up for aspiring "leaders", not aspiring "teammates".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is really terrible ...., July 31, 2013
By 
BruceK (Palo Alto, CA, United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
The issues I have with this book is that there is nothing concrete at all in any of the chapters, it is all soft anecdotal stories that can be interpreted and worked around any way to prove anything.

It's all words, and stories designed almost like it was before the book was even written to appeal to people and make them feel smart and better about themselves rather than tell them anything or any real knowledge.

All the stories could have multiple interpretations that could be argued forever, because there is no solid truth about what goes on in companies and why, and a heck of a lot of it is politics or luck.

They seem to pull out some awfully bad quotes from people and make a big deal about them, as if they prove something permanent about that person, or that a person who says bad quotes must be a bad manager.

They tell stories about a tank commander who did not get along with one student and tried to flunk him out, but the student did great with a different commander. So the "bad" tank commander was a DIMINISHER and the good tank commander was a "MULTIPLIER" .... wow! Except we have to assume the DIMINISHER tank commander was graduating other students who were competent, and the MULTIPLIER tank commander may have had problems with other different kinds of students. The problem is there is no depth or scientific control to anything in this book.

After listening to about half the book where it is all about the same I started to just get the feeling this was just a book to appeal to certain people wanting to read a book like this as opposed to anything that really have something to say. You can read this book and think to yourself ... my last manager was a MULTIPLIER, or if I was a manager I would be a MULTIPLIER.

Names and companies are thrown around all-knowingly like the author is totally familiar or best friends, but to really find out what is going on in a group of co-workers, I think it is pretty difficult, and often does not matter. Some of the bad managers might just be ones who get results but leave a lot of damage in their wake, and some of the most decorated managers in companies as anyone knows who has worked in corporate America are not motivation behind whatever accomplishment is being touted.

Read "Thinking Fast and Slow" and you find out that there is a lot we think we know or can analyse that just is not so, but it is comforting to think or makes money for a certain group .... maybe some might like this book because it is comforting but I don't think there is much in here that will really make any kind of difference in anything but comfort level with ideas that are very soft.

If you feel you must read this book I would suggest getting it in Audible format where they allow you to return it if you do not like in within a certain time. If you think I am wrong ... then keep it, and come back here and tell me why, please. But one thing, Audible/Amazon is nice enough to trust people with this really customer-centric ability, do not abuse it please - I'd like them to keep it around for a while.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Multipliers book changed my life, December 11, 2010
By 
Melissa Walker (Alexandria, VA United States) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
I have never seen a book pull together so much research and comprehensive management thinking into such a succinct, balanced and life-changing premise. This book explained why some managers are good bosses and some are bad bosses without resorting to the old explanation that a manager isn't a leader or vice-versa. Truly ground-breaking and a must read for anyone who wants to know how to make a difference in their circle of life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Few Wonderful Ideas, March 4, 2013
By 
Curtis W. Bobbitt (Great Falls, MT USA) - See all my reviews
Wiseman and McKeown offer five or six great, helpful, achievable ways to shift leadership focus from selfish to servant. The book, however, repeats those ideas with little variation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Multipliers...a great concept, February 4, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter (Hardcover)
Multipliers: How the best leaders make everyone smarter has some great concepts. We live in a knowledge society where achievement and success hinges on leadership. Schools know this very well. We all know that the key to a great school is great leadership. Multipliers drives home the point that some leaders multiply the talent, ability, and efforts of those around them while other people diminish talent, ability, effort, and intelligence.

The authors contend that great leaders get more out of those around them through five different sets of behaviors:

1) The Talent Magnet: They attract talented people. Talented people have choices when it comes to work. They don't have to work for boss's that don't bring out the best in them.

2) The Liberator: Great leaders give people the freedom to create solutions and lead.

3) The Challenger: A effective leader challenges and inspires those around them and as a result, more quality work gets done.

4) The Debate Maker: These leaders are not afraid--actually they encourage--rigorous debate so that the best ideas can get implemented. They don't shut others down.

5) The Investor: Great leaders empower and invest in those around them and as a result, workers give more of themselves to the task.

Leaders who multiply are not easy to find, but these skills can be developed in anyone who is looking to improve their performance. This book stresses that every leader is somewhere on the Diminisher to Multiplier continuum. By finding out where you are, you can take specific steps to improve your leadership skills and get the full engagement out of those you lead.

Every teacher can be a multiplier to their students, and every principal can work on their multiplying skills for the adults that work in the school.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter
Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter by Liz Wiseman (Hardcover - June 15, 2010)
$26.99 $15.69
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.