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The Mummy or Ramses the Damned Mass Market Paperback – September 13, 1991


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (September 13, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345369947
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345369949
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.1 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (280 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #129,275 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

InThe Mummy Anne Rice weaves the same magic for the world and history of mummies that she previously did for the worlds and mythologies of vampires and witches. Ramses the Great lives, but having drunk the elixir of life, he is now Ramses the Damned, doomed forever to wander the earth, desperate to quell certain mummy hungers that can never be satisfied! --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Library Journal

With this kick-off to a new series, Vampire Chronicler Rice abandons her troupe of nocturnals for the living dead of another kind. In a tale that's part horror and part romance, Egyptian King Ramses, made immortal in his youth, is awakened from self-imposed dormancy and deposited in 1914 London. Ramses's introduction to modern times is charming but slow. The plot, however, revs up a bit when he returns to Cairo and runs into an old girlfriend. Much in this book will be familiar to Rice's fans, except in this case it doesn't work. The characters are mostly boring and the conflict is flimsy. You know nothing bad is going to happen to anybody--and nothing does. You're also cheated out of a genuine conclusion, which is both dissatisfying and unfair. Stick to those blood drinkers, Anne, and let the sleeping mummies lie.
- Michael Rogers, "Library Journal"
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Anne Rice was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. She holds a Master of Arts Degree in English and Creative Writing from San Francisco State University, as well as a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science. Anne has spent more of her life in California than in New Orleans, but New Orleans is her true home and provides the back drop for many of her famous novels. The French Quarter provided the setting for her first novel, Interview with the Vampire. And her ante-bellum house in the Garden District was the fictional home of her imaginary Mayfair Witches.

She is the author of over 30 books, most recently the Toby O'Dare novels Of Love and Evil, and Angel Time; the memoir, Called Out of Darkness;and her two novels about Jesus, Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt and Christ the Lord: The Road to Cana. (Anne regards Christ the Lord: The Road to Cana as her best novel.) ---- Under the pen name, A.N. Roquelaure, Anne is the author of the erotic (BDSM) fantasy series, The Sleeping Beauty Trilogy. Under the pen name Anne Rampling she is the author of two erotic novels, Exit to Eden and Belinda.

Anne publicly broke with organized religion in July of 2010 on moral grounds, affirming her faith in God, but refusing any longer to be called "Christian." The story attracted surprising media attention, with Rice's remarks being quoted in stories all over the world. Anne hopes that her two novels about Jesus will be accepted on their merits by readers and transcend her personal difficulties with religion. "Both my Christ the Lord novels were written with deep conviction and a desire to write the best novels possible about Jesus that were rooted in the bible and in the Christian tradition. I think they are among the best books I've ever been able to write, and I do dream of a day when they are evaluated without any connection to me personally. I continue to get a lot of very favorable feedback on them from believers and non believers. I remain very proud of them."

Anne is very active on her FaceBook Fan Page and has well over a million followers. She answers questions every day on the page, and also posts on a variety of topics, including literature, film, music, politics, religion, and her own writings. Many indie authors follow the page, and Anne welcomes posts that include advice for indie authors. She welcomes discussion there on numerous topics. She frequently asks her readers questions about their response to her work and joins in the discussions prompted by these questions.

Her latest novel, "The Wolves of Midwinter," a sequel to "The Wolf Gift" and part of a werewolf series set in Northern California in the present time, will be published on October 15, 2013. In these books --- The Wolf Gift Chronicles -- Anne returns to the classic monsters and themes of supernatural literature, similar to those she explored in her Vampire Chronicles, and tales of the Mayfair Witches. Her new "man wolf" hero, Reuben Golding, is a talented young man in his twenties who suddenly discovers himself in possession of werewolf powers that catapult him into the life of a comic book style super hero. How Reuben learns to control what he is, how he discovers others who possess the same mysterious "wolf gift," and how he learns to live with what he has become --- is the main focus of the series. "The Wolves of Midwinter" is a big Christmas book --- a book about Christmas traditions, customs, and the old haunting rituals of Midwinter practiced in Europe and in America. It's about how the werewolves celebrate these rituals, as humans and as werewolves. But the book also carries forward the story of Reuben's interactions with his girl friend, Laura, and with his human family, with particular focus on Reuben's father, Phil, and his brother, Jim. As a big family novel with elements of the supernatural, "The Wolves of Midwinter" has much in common with Anne's earlier book, "The Witching Hour." Among the treats of "The Wolves of Midwinter" is a tragic ghost who appears in the great house at Nideck Point, and other "ageless ones" who add their mystery and history to the unfolding revelations that at times overwhelm Reuben.

In October of 2014, with the publication of "Prince Lestat," Anne will be returning to the fabled "Brat Prince" of the Vampire Chronicles, catching up with him in present time. This is the first of several books planned focusing on Lestat's new adventures with other members of the Vampire tribe. When the publication of "Prince Lestat" was announced on Christopher Rice's "The Dinner Party Show," a weekly internet radio broadcast, it made headlines in the US and around the world.

Anne's first novel, Interview with the Vampire, was published in 1976 and has gone on to become one of the best-selling novels of all time. She continued her saga of the Vampire Lestat in a series of books, collectively known as The Vampire Chronicles, which have had both great mainstream and cult followings.

Interview with the Vampire was made into a motion picture in 1994, directed by Neil Jordan, and starring Brad Pitt, Tom Cruise, Kirsten Dunst and Antonio Banderas. The film became an international success. Anne's novel, Feast of All Saints about the free people of color of ante-bellum New Orleans became a Showtime mini series in 2001 and is available now on dvd. The script for the mini series by John Wilder was a faithful adaptation of the novel.

Anne Rice is also the author of other novels, including The Witching Hour, Servant of the Bones, Merrick, Blackwood Farm, Blood Canticle, Violin, and Cry to Heaven. She lives in Palm Desert, California, but misses her home in New Orleans. She hopes to obtain a pied a terre in the French Quarter there some time in the near future.

Anne has this to say of her work: "I have always written about outsiders, about outcasts, about those whom others tend to shun or persecute. And it does seem that I write a lot about their interaction with others like them and their struggle to find some community of their own. The supernatural novel is my favorite way of talking about my reality. I see vampires and witches and ghosts as metaphors for the outsider in each of us, the predator in each of us...the lonely one who must grapple day in and day out with cosmic uncertainty."

Customer Reviews

When I first read this book, I couldn't put it down.
"athena_014"
She did a great job on drawing me into the Mummy's story, and the plot line and characters were so very satisfactory.
R. Jones
The words just seemed to flow and the story line was very interesting.
Andrea Domeck

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 9, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Sexy immortals with angst to spare are the cornerstones of Anne Rice's fiction. "The Mummy or Ramses the Damned" takes a different direction, mixing romance with horror and supernatural thrills. It has its flaws, but the raw energy of the book keeps it roaring up to the finale.
Lawrence Stratford uncovers the mummy of Ramses the Second, or "Ramses the Damned." But before he can unravel the mysteries around the mummy, he's murdered by his amoral nephew Henry, and the mummy is shipped to England. Lawrence's daughter Julie takes possession both of the family fortune and the mummy -- only to have the mummy revive when exposed to sunlight, and try to kill the murderous Henry. He's Ramses, an Egyptian king who drank an elixir of eternal life taken from a Hittite priestess.
Long ago, he faked his own death and wandered the world, eventually returning to Egypt and becoming the mentor/lover of the legendary Cleopatra -- only to lose her first to Antony, then to death. At first, Ramses is thrilled by the early-twentieth-century England, and he and Julie start to fall in love. But on a trip to Egypt, he comes across the mummy of Cleopatra, and revives her with a vial of the elixir. Except that this Cleopatra is mad, murderous, torn by her old loves and hates -- and unkillable.
This is not your parents' "Mummy" story. Except for one mildly funny scene where Rameses first revives, there are no stumbling mummies covered in bandages. Instead we have a tortured immortal who wakes up into a new world, while still being rooted in the Egypt of three thousand years ago.
Rice's lush prose is well-suited to the splendor of early twentieth-century England, when Egyptology was the fad -- she has lots of fun with the lace, pearl buttons, and opera houses.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By AlexD on August 16, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is without a doubt my favourite Anne Rice novel. I've lost count of the number of times I've read it (I've even read it in Spanish which is my mother tongue and it compared just the same).
I love how it starts very reminiscent of the old black & white horror movies and then becomes something new, something better. Then there's those 6 degrees of separation in the handling of her relationships between all the main characters. The story goes back and forth between the present (Edwardian England & Egypt) and ancient Egypt, slowly giving us the history of Ramses, how he became immortal and what he does with his immortally.

Each time I finish the book it leaves me wanting more, and although Ms Rice promises at the end that the series will continue, it is now 23 years since it was first published and still no sign of a sequel. That said, no good library would be complete without a copy of this book. It is a must. Don't think twice about it. Buy it - you won't be disappointed.

And Ms Rice should you ever chance upon this review, I plead to you, please, please, please write the sequel. You've already left me hanging, and wanting more, for the last 23 years!!!!
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Erica Anderson on October 7, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I rarely read any books of Anne Rice's that isn't part of the Vampire Chronicles sereis. I've tried but they never captivated me like her popular vampire books have. The one book by Anne Rice that I do like that has nothing to do with vampires is "The Mummy or Ramses the Dead". This time Anne explores another legendary monster...the mummy but in her book, she makes the mummy, or Ramses as he is called, the hero not the monster we have seen in old horror movies. In a similiar vein to her vampire characters, Anne has Ramses the second immortal. He had drunk the elixir of life making him wander the planet for all eternity. Ramses who had been asleep for thousands of years is excavated in the early 1900s by Lawrence Stratford. Ramses witnesses Lawrence's unexpected passing. Later he finally awakens to save Lawrence's daughter from being murdered by her greedy cousin. In the vein of the vampire chronicles, Anne mixes horror and romance which I actually enjoyed. Critics may have panned this book but I loved it. I especially enjoyed it when Ramses makes the mistake of reawakening an old love only to realize what a mistake that was and the one person he does love is Julie Stratford. Even though the storyline is pretty cheesy and is just a Harlequin novel with a horror twist, "The Mummy" is a good book. It's a different take on the myth of the mummy.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 30, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While my favorite Rice book of all time is The Vampire Lestat (Who couldn't love that rogue?) a close second is The Mummy. I thoroughly loved the book and it's one reason why I remain an Anne Rice fan. I especially liked the vivid description of when Julie meets the Mummy for the first time. I don't often reread books, but this one I've kept close at hand. I've read all of Rice's Witching Chronicles as well as her Vampire Chronicles... and was only really disappointed with Memnoch. But Rice on the final page promises more on the Mummy... Heck, even Lestat hinted at the existence of immortals who walk by day... So let's have more PLEASE! I'm anxiously waiting!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By M.A. Walton on January 6, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read this book before. It is probably one of Anne Rice's best books. The story of Ramses the Damned is told with a new twist. The Egytians beloved in immortality and this book addresses that belief, but also shows the dark side. Would you want to be immortal knowing everyone you loved was not? What would you do if unscrupulous people secured the formula for immortality?
As for pure entertainment, The Mummy does just that. It is nothing like the movies seen today. Well worth the read! I have read it several times and get something out of it each time.
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