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69 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE Christie Book
This is the most controversial mystery novel of the 20th century. It nearly got Agatha Christie kicked out of the Detection Club (an organization of writers who agreed to play fair). It put her on the map. It's her best work - ever.

The book is a first person account of a Hercule Poriot mystery, done by Doctor James Sheppard, a country doctor serving his...
Published on January 12, 2005 by Jeffrey Clinard

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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprise Ending but Not the Best Christie By Far!
This hardcover version of this famous novel is reasonably good except that the binding seems to come apart at around page 115 although the font size of the words seems to be just right for comfortable reading.

Now to the novel itself: we get a retired Hercule Poirot agreeing to distract himself from his new hobby of gardening to try and find out who killed a...
Published on June 24, 2006 by Frederick Baptist


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69 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE Christie Book, January 12, 2005
This review is from: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
This is the most controversial mystery novel of the 20th century. It nearly got Agatha Christie kicked out of the Detection Club (an organization of writers who agreed to play fair). It put her on the map. It's her best work - ever.

The book is a first person account of a Hercule Poriot mystery, done by Doctor James Sheppard, a country doctor serving his community. He was there from almost the beginning, and his narrative provides a wonderful account of the murder of his friend, Rodger Ackroyd.

Rodger Ackroyd's female friend took her own life. She wrote a letter to him before she did so, naming the man who ruined her life - a blackmailer who knew she killed her first husband. Rodger read the letter to Dr. Sheppard, but wouldn't continue when he realized a blackmailer would be exposed because of it. Dr. Sheppard begged him to continue and get the name - to no avail.

Ackroyd didn't comply. James Sheppard left and went home, only to get a myserious phone call telling him Rodger had been murdered. Murdered he was - and the letter was missing!

Enter Sheppard's neighbor, Hercule Poriot. Dr. Sheppard plays Dr. Watson, following the sleuth around and recording what he finds. From a missing son to a married maid; from the theft of household money.

In the end, Poroit invites all the cast to a room where he talks about the case, and says he has a solution - which he will reveal to the police in 24 hours. The only way for an innocent man to be saved was for the real killer to confess one way or another... and even though Dr. Sheppard has all the facts of the case, he can't see how Poriot could put them all together into a surprising solution of the case.

In short, if you want a book that will shock you, read this one. Well crafted, with devious plot devices, Christie showed her genius for detective fiction with this book. It was a work of genius because she had the imagination to do something amazingly original. It may have nearly got her kicked out of the Detection Club, but history has sided with her - she was right all along. This is her most classic work of all time.
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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you've never read Christie before, begin here!, January 10, 2000
By 
H. Lim (Carlingford, NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first Christie I ever read - and it's a real masterpiece. The ending is pretty horrifying, but read the book again, and you'll wonder why you didn't notice various things - things the Murderer/Murderess (I'm not saying which it is!)said and did during the novel, that one didn't notice at the time. Extremely good stuff.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anything but a predictable mystery novel!!, October 13, 2003
This review is from: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
Agatha Christie is recognized throughout the world as being the "Queen of Crime". It is undoubtable that this holds true, especially in her ingeniously written, classic mystery novel, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. The story is told through the 1st person point of view, so the narrator, James Sheppard ( the local doctor ), is one of the main characters. He introduces all the characters in the small English town of King's Abbot, where the story is set: Mrs. Ferrars, Flora, Ralph Paton, Ursula Bourne, Hector Blunt, Colonel Carter, the formidable Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot, and many more.
The story begins with the suicide of Mrs. Ferrars, which stirrs confusion; Rumors say that she poisoned her first husband, that someone was blackmailing her, and that she had a secret liaison with Roger Ackroyd. The mystery surrounding her death appalls everyone even more when Roger Ackroyd is brutally stabbed to death a few days later. Hercule Poirot, accompanied by Dr. Sheppard, set out to trace the tracks of a very sharp and devious killer.
I found it extremely captivating up to the very end, which I found was the best part of the novel. There are so many twists in the plot, red herrings, clues, and foreshadowing, yet the solution to the crime completely eludes the reader until told. All the characters and their different possible motives, which Agatha Christie carefully presents, are subject to questioning; therefore, at one point or another, I suspected almost everyone to have committed the murder.
What I loved most is that I was caught off-guard many times while reading. I have a vague idea in my head and then when I turn the next page, I'm proved wrong. Agatha Christie has an unbelievable imagination and talent that she is able to make such a simple detail become the turning point in the mystery. You are always expecting the opposite of what truly happens,and I think that is what is brilliant about her writing, and especially this novel.
In the end, when you are told the conclusion to the story, the shock is so tremendous that it creates a smile on the reader's face. Automatically, you realize how obvious the answer was and how from the very beginning, the cards were layed out on the table face-up, yet you are still incredibly decieved.
I would absolutely recommend this book to anyone and everyone who wants to have an insightful and captivating time trying to unravel the mystery of the death of Roger Ackroyd!
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, but BE CAREFUL..., May 20, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
This is a wonderful book--one of Agatha Christie's best, and justifiably famous. This was one of the last Christie mysteries I read, and I was mortified to find that I figured out who the murderer was early on. Because of all the hype surrounding this book and its...well, unique elements (I don't want to give anything away), I found the book somewhat spoiled for me. If you haven't read this book, I urge you NOT to read any reviews of it, because they do inadvertantly spoil it.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Stunner, May 27, 2002
This review is from: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
This is the Agatha Christie novel that had both her competitors and critics crying foul at the solution to the crime--but although the book has its weaknesses, the solution is not one of them. THE MURDER OF ROGER ACKROYD remains one of the most startling novels in the entire murder mystery genre, and it should be very near the top of any murder mystery fan's reading list.
Told from the point of view of a village doctor, ACKROYD opens with a suspicious death--and this is followed by the murder of Ackroyd, a wealthy local who learns more about the suspicious death than it is wise to know, and whose death draws Hercule Poirot to investigate. This is not actually one of Christie's more smoothly written novels; most of the characters (excluding Caroline, the village gossip, who is a delight) seem more than a little flat, the narrative drags a bit here and there, and the plot is extremely tricksy... but the conclusion is a stunner, perhaps the single most famous plot twist of Christie's long and revered career. An absolute must read!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I know the murderer is in this room...All the facts lead indisputably to one person.", January 22, 2007
This review is from: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
As seductive as a sudoku puzzle, with all the facts of a devilish murder laid out for the reader to solve, if only s/he reads carefully enough, this 1926 mystery is still captivating new readers. A contemporary of popular mystery writers Dorothy Sayers and Marjorie Allingham, Christie writes novels which are less character-driven than Sayers's novels and less elitist (and sometimes satirical) than Allingham's. Instead, Christie carves out a niche writing mysteries with unusually clever plots, even if, as in this case, she has to violate the conventions of the mystery/detective genre to make them work.

No spoilers. When Hercule Poirot, the French detective who uses his "little gray cells," retires and moves to the small rural village of King's Abbott, he quickly learns of the death of Mrs. Ferrars, who, after her husband's mysterious death, had intended to marry Roger Ackroyd. Soon, however, Roger Ackroyd himself is found dead, stabbed in the back in his study.

An unusual number of complications make this mystery particularly challenging. The disappearance of Ackroyd's stepson (his major heir) is thought to signal his guilt, but there are others who also have motives. A maid has been dismissed under mysterious circumstances, Ackroyd's sister-in-law has serious debts, a stranger has appeared at Fernly Park at the time of the murder and has then disappeared, and Ackroyd himself has been trying to control his estate by securing the marriage of his niece to his stepson.

Details of the mystery are not unique. Christie also uses the attempt of a wealthy man to control his heirs' marriages in _Dead Man's Mirror_, for example, along with the familiar concept of a murderer entering and leaving a locked room via a window. Mysterious strangers are a cliché, as are dismissed maids who have secrets. Throughout, the characterization extends only as far as is necessary for the plot. Told by Dr. James Sheppard, a friend and frequent visitor of Ackroyd's, the novel is justifiably one of Christie's most famous, however--and its creative conclusion revolutionized mystery writing not only in its time, but forever. Don't miss this one. n Mary Whipple
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Agatha Christie's best, August 3, 2001
By 
This review is from: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) (Mass Market Paperback)
Agatha Christie wrote mysteries in which the detective is almost never in danger,. There are seldom any car chases, shootouts, fist fights or explosions. There is no bad language or graphic sex. Christie's great talent was in putting together word puzzles. She puts all the clues in front of us and then devotes her considerable talent to confusing and misleading us as to the identity of the murderer. And she does it so wonderfully and so completely that we love her. Go figure. If you are new to the mystery genre, start with another book. This one was written for experienced mystery readers. If you are an avid reader of cozy mysteries, you will love The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reading of a very amusing murder novel, May 30, 2001
When <The Murder of Roger Ackroyd> appeared in 1926, it was Agatha Christie's sixth novel under her real name and the third to feature Hercule Poirot, not counting a collection of short stories about the Belgian sleuth. It also caused a storm of controversy at the Detection Club, of which she was a member, because she broke one of their prime rules of detective fiction writing. (The trouble is, I cannot tell you what rule that was without ruining the solution for you.) But even if you disregard the twist at the end, you still have a thumping good murder yarn that concentrates very closely on Poirot's methods of ignoring nothing and--how I wish many of us were like this--refusing to twist the facts to fit his theories.
This novel benefits further from the supremely comic (and believable) character of Caroline Sheppard, the narrator's sister. (This book is in the form of a journal kept like those of Dr. Watson by a participant in the events and therefore is in the first person. This gives Christie the right to keep Poirot's thoughts unknown to us until they are revealed to the center of consciousness.) The other characters, save that of Poirot, of course, are given just enough personality to make the plot work; but this is also expected in Christie's works.
If you saw the dramatization of this book on A&E, you will see how badly they bobbled the "surprise ending" and even changed Caroline's character in a totally unnecessary way. It does, however, pare away some of the really extraneous business that Christie added to make her plot more complicated.
Nevertheless, here we are dealing with an excellent READING of the entire original work on six cassettes published by Audio Partners. In "Death on the Nile" and "Murder on the Orient Express," which I have already reviewed, Audio Partners has David Suchet reading all the parts, using a different voice for each. Here we have actor Robin Bailey doing the honors and he is quite good. Of course, we might quibble that the character he is really playing, Dr. Sheppard, the writer of the journal, could not be quite so good a mimic; but as a reading, we suspend disbelief and enjoy Bailey's talent.
What more to say? A very amusing novel read excellently is all one needs to give this Audio Partners offering a five-star rating.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Christie Delivers a Masterpiece, August 1, 2007
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In perhaps, one of the finest of all Hercule Poirot mysteries, Agatha Christie crafts an ingenious plot with nothing less than stunning revelations at the conclusion. Her sheer genius leaves the reader breathless. Set in the small town of Kings Abbot, a retired Hercule Poirot becomes involved in solving the scandalous murder of Roger Ackroyd, the town's richest inhabitant. Unable to stay away from mystery for long, Poirot's interest is piqued and he is easily convinced into joining the investigation. Unlike other stories to follow, this one is narrated by the pleasant voice of Dr. James Sheppard, who chronicles the events and accompanies Poirot in Hastings absence. Clues abound and everyone at Fernly Park is a suspect. Only Poirot seems to understand the meaning of what he sees, not the inspector in charge of the case, the polite Dr. Sheppard or the reader can distinguish the significance or the insignificance of the many clues and converstations laid out in the story. This story in particular, in my opinion ,is a sample of Christie's best writing. The way the the reader is manipulated will be emulated in many novels to follow by other mystery writers. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd comes to a stunning conclusion, while the reader simply shakes their head acknowledging that Poirot is indeed master of the "little gray cells."
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprise Ending but Not the Best Christie By Far!, June 24, 2006
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This hardcover version of this famous novel is reasonably good except that the binding seems to come apart at around page 115 although the font size of the words seems to be just right for comfortable reading.

Now to the novel itself: we get a retired Hercule Poirot agreeing to distract himself from his new hobby of gardening to try and find out who killed a well-known and respected gentlemen, Mr. Roger Ackroyd. The novel is typical Christie but is not the best one that she's written. For that you'd have to read "And Then There Were None." Even "Murder on the Orient Express", "Death on the Nile" and "Something Evil This Way Comes" are much, much better overall works but this novel's claim to fame is really the unexpected and previously unused formula for the ending. Otherwise, the rest of the novel is pretty boring as every evidence seems to point to an obvious culprit who, thanks to the brilliant Poirot, is exonerated. If you are a fan of the detective, whodunnit genre, then read this as essential reading for the genre but just know that Agatha Christie has written better novels and if you decide to never ever read another Christie novel, you must at least read "And Then There Were None" or any of the others listed above.
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The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot Mysteries)
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) by Agatha Christie (Mass Market Paperback - March 1, 2000)
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