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Murder in Baker street New Tales of Sherlock Holmes Unknown Binding – 2001


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Unknown Binding, 2001
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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: MJF; First edition. edition (2001)
  • ASIN: B0028M0DIM
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,791,148 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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When I was twelve years old (more than five and a half decades ago), I joyfully read every one of the original Sherlock Holmes novels and stories by Conan Doyle. Since that time, I have reread about half of them and have read over two hundred Holmes parodies and pastiches written by others. At present, there are over a dozen anthologies of Holmes pastiches available, and I am sorry to report that MURDER IN BAKER STREET: NEW TALES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES, edited by Greenberg, Lellenberg, and Stashower, is one of the most disappointing of these. Despite the fine mysteries that some of its authors have published elsewhere, only one of this book's eleven stories receives a letter grade of "A" from me, two get a "B," three a "C," two a "D," and each of the remaining three earns a solid "F".

Placed after the works of fiction, this book contains autobiographical material from Conan Doyle's MEMORIES AND ADVENTURES (1924), titled "Sidelights on Sherlock Holmes," as well as a pair of critical essays: "100 Years of Sherlock Holmes" by Lloyd Rose, a theater critic, and "And Now, a Word from Arthur Conan Doyle" by Jon L. Lellenberg, one of the editors. For different reasons, I found each of these worth reading; other fans of Holmes and Watson may prefer to skip them.

As I said in a review of another Holmes anthology, while a parody tries to amuse readers with humorous mockery and succeeds by being deliberately excessive or deliberately defective in one or more of its elements, a pastiche aims to please readers by replicating the chief effects of some enjoyable original work by closely mimicking all or most of its original elements.
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When I was twelve years old (more than five and a half decades ago), I joyfully read every one of the original Sherlock Holmes novels and stories by Conan Doyle. Since that time, I have reread about half of them and have read over two hundred Holmes parodies and pastiches written by others. At present, there are over a dozen anthologies of Holmes pastiches available, and I am sorry to report that MURDER IN BAKER STREET: NEW TALES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES, edited by Greenberg, Lellenberg, and Stashower, is one of the most disappointing of these. Despite the fine mysteries that some of its authors have published elsewhere, only one of this book's eleven stories receives a letter grade of "A" from me, two get a "B," three a "C," two a "D," and each of the remaining three earns a solid "F".

Placed after the works of fiction, this book contains autobiographical material from Conan Doyle's MEMORIES AND ADVENTURES (1924), titled "Sidelights on Sherlock Holmes," as well as a pair of critical essays: "100 Years of Sherlock Holmes" by Lloyd Rose, a theater critic, and "And Now, a Word from Arthur Conan Doyle" by Jon L. Lellenberg, one of the editors. For different reasons, I found each of these worth reading; other fans of Holmes and Watson may prefer to skip them.

As I said in a review of another Holmes anthology, while a parody tries to amuse readers with humorous mockery and succeeds by being deliberately excessive or deliberately defective in one or more of its elements, a pastiche aims to please readers by replicating the chief effects of some enjoyable original work by closely mimicking all or most of its original elements.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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