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A Murder of Crows

15 customer reviews

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Audio CD, September 13, 2004
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Editorial Reviews

German edition of the progressive/power metal band's 2003 album features 12 tracks including one bonus track, 'Time'. Slipcase. Inside Out/SPV.


1. Feed (Part 1) Stone By Stone
2. Feed (Part 2) Stone By Stone
3. The Messenger
4. In A Garden Made Of Stones
5. Some Things You Cant Return
6. Angels In Vertigo
7. Regret
8. Crows On The Wire
9. Im Not Waving
10. Flies
11. Black Smoke And Mirrors
12. Time (Bonus Track)

Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 13, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Inside Out U.S.
  • ASIN: B00009AHPQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #28,253 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By meh on July 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
A Murder of Crows, the second album from Dead Soul Tribe (basically Devon Graves), sees Devon recruiting an amazing drummer to complement his amazing voice. Alread with that addition, AMoC has an advantage over his first album. It is also much more structured, while the S/T album sounded like an odd mishmash of Ministry, Tool, and Jethro Tull, A Murder of Crows gives Dead Soul Tribe a more refined sound. Comparison's to Tool can be drawn instantly - Devon, like Maynard, has an amazing voice; both bands play dark music; the drumming is similar and both bands can orchestrate amazing build ups that are spine chilling.

That being said, Dead Soul Tribe and Tool have one key difference - the main emotion being used. While Tool are mostly angry, Dead Soul Tribe are either hopeful or bleak. Devon's few attempts at anger on this album come off rather weak, but the way he changes his voice to suit every other emotion works perfectly.

Overall a good album that fans of Tool, rock, or prog should check out... or just check it out to listen to Devon's amazing voice.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By D. Knouse on February 10, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I first heard their eponymous debut and immediately thought that this band was very original. Their myriad influences include "Alice in Chains"(particularly their debut), "Tool"(yes, but these guys are a different animal), and perhaps even a little "Queensryche"(a touch of Progressive Power Metal) for starters. It's really hard to nail these guys down, and that is what makes them worth hearing. The arrangements here are what makes this especially memorable; the production also shines. I got both of their albums at the same time and it is immediately obvious that this album will be getting more of my attention. There is no filler here, either, making this a must for progressive metal fans. I keep returning to this CD because it has everything a great album should: excellent musicianship, memorable songwriting, ambition, energy, emotion, superb arrangements, and stellar production. This is a great experience. Later.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kamil on August 4, 2004
Format: Audio CD
3.5 stars actually.

„A Murder Of Crows" is the second recording by Dead Soul Tribe, a band formed by charismatic vocalist Devon Graves, previously known as Buddy Lackey.

Devon was the vocalist of a legend band Psychotic Waltz so the expectations for his new group were very big. The self titled debut of Dead Soul Tribe was released in 2002 and, to be honest, didn't fully meet my expectations. Well off course the songs had the same dark mood that

Psychotic Waltz compositions, but overall they weren't as complex and adventurous.

But how about Dead Soul Tribe second recording? The dark mood remained and, what's even more important, the compositions became more interesting. "A Murder Of Crows" is a semi-concept album that deals with isolation and individualism in the society. The lyrics are poetic and often somewhat surreal. The songs are at times hard edged, and sometimes calm and atmospheric. Sometimes simple, sometimes very progressive. Still, always they remain very disturbing.

The music by Dead Soul Tribe isn't for the faint hearted but if you enjoy the darker side of progressive rock music, it will definitely appeal to you. Recommended, but still this isn't on the quality level that Psychotic Waltz had accustomed us to.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Murat Batmaz on May 13, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Devon Graves was previously known as Buddy Lackey in his former band Psychotic Waltz. It was a shame when Psychotic Waltz broke up and everyone in the band went their own way.
I heard that Devon released a solo album but never had the chance to track it down and check it out. I, however, made sure I picked up both Dead Soul Tribe discs and have been spinning them on and off for a long time. The first DST disc didn't really grab me right away being a huge change of style from Psychotic Waltz. With the release of A Murder of Crows, however, the music on their debut speaks much better to me now as well. It's just a matter of time for this band to grow on you.
A Murder of Crows is a semi-concept album in the way that some tunes are linked with each other and deal with themes like the isolation of the individual in the society. Although there's a underlying concept running through the album, all songs can be listened and enjoyed independently. On a thematic level the album makes a philosophical statement about crows carrying the souls of dead people and Devon questions the ones that cannot make it to the beyond. The album aims to produce more questions to think about instead of offering pseudo-intellectual artistic messages. The lyrics are very poetic and a bit surreal but they never lose their touch with the listener and become too sterile to take seriously.
Devon has mixed and produced this album and the sonic quality of it is really amazing. Unlike the self-titled debut, the involvement of the other band members seems more prevalant. I am particularly impressed by Adel Moustafa's drumming, both his tone and the way he chose to express himself. His technique is combined with a strange kind of creativity that is hard to explain.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tom Chase on October 30, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This was my first introduction to the world of Devon Graves, I'd heard all the comparisons to Tool, one of my favourite bands, and being a prog metal fan, it seemed a logical choice. The music is powerful, full of some great riffs, but its Graves' vocals and lyrics (poetic theme of crows carrying the souls of the dead) that complete the picture, and what a picture it is.

The album starts wonderfully with the two parts `Feed' piece, one of DST's finest songs to date. Everything is on display here, some simple but well executed guitar playing, highly technical drumming from the skilled Adel Moustafa, and of course haunting melodies sung to perfection by Graves' piercing vocals. `Messenger' is one of my favourites on the album, it has a rather monotonous riff played throughout, but the vocal melodies and lyrics are just stunning, surprisingly `feel good' for such a sinister album. `Some Things You Can't Return' is the defining moment to the album, following the themes of the lost souls concept, but its Graves' vocal delivery that simply floored me, beautiful yet penetrating. Songs such as `Garden Made Of Stones' `Angels In Vertigo' and `I'm Not Waving' hold the album together perfectly. The last touch of greatness comes in the raucous `Crows On The Wire' with its tension building intro, huge riff and catchy melodies, a certain high point.

Overall this is one fine album that doesn't get nearly enough recognition. For fans of prog rock/metal who enjoy the likes of Tool, Pain Of Salvation, Nevermore...

Also see Graves' former legendary band 'Psychotic Waltz'.
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