Murder In Chinatown (Gaslight Mystery) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.96
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Dust jacket in Has dustjacket condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Murder In Chinatown (Gaslight Mystery) Hardcover – June 5, 2007


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.76 $0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
Audio CD
"Please retry"
$24.94
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Gaslight Mystery (Book 9)
  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley Hardcover (June 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425215318
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425215319
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.1 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #989,745 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Edgar-finalist Thompson's eye-opening ninth Gaslight mystery (after 2006's Murder in Little Italy) examines the culture clash in early 20th-century New York City between Chinese and Irish immigrants, whose poverty prompted many of them to intermarry. While midwife Sarah Brandt is attending pregnant Cora Lee, a strapping Irish girl whose husband is a successful Chinese merchant, Cora's teenage half-Chinese niece, Angel, bursts into Cora's Chinatown flat and asks Cora to save her from an arranged marriage to Mr. Wong, an elderly Chinese restaurant owner. When Angel later disappears, Sarah investigates and learns the missing girl had a secret lover, a young Irishman. After Angel winds up dead in an alley, Sarah turns to her detective friend, Frank Malloy, for help. The action of this thought-provoking novel with its vivid portrait of the miseries of tenement life builds to an unexpected climax.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Midwife Sarah Brandt's patient, Cora Lee, is an Irish woman with a Chinese husband. In New York at the beginning of the twentieth century, impoverished immigrants often married one another, but cultural differences led to conflict. As Sarah attends the birth of Cora's son, Cora's young, half-Chinese niece, Angel, runs into the room to ask for help. Her father has arranged her marriage to an elderly Chinese man. Angel later disappears, and Sarah helps the family investigate. When Angel turns up dead in an alley, Sarah asks her friend, Frank Malloy, a New York City police detective, for help. It seems that Angel had a secret lover, a young Irish boy. As the plot unfolds, readers will learn about the miseries of tenement life, the discrimination against Chinese and Irish immigrants, and the hardships and dangers facing young women. They will also be drawn to Sarah, a strong, caring female protagonist who is not afraid to help those in need. The unexpected climax adds to the impact of this first-class historical mystery. Bibel, Barbara

More About the Author

Edgar® Nominated author Victoria Thompson writes the Gaslight Mystery Series, set in turn-of-the-century New York City and featuring midwife Sarah Brandt. Her latest is MURDER ON FIFTH AVENUE. She also contributed to the award winning writing textbook MANY GENRES/ONE CRAFT. A popular speaker, Victoria teaches in the Seton Hill University master's program in writing popular fiction. She lives in Central PA with her husband and a very spoiled little dog.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
25
4 star
14
3 star
5
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 44 customer reviews
I have now read all of Victoria Thompsons' books from this series.
Lily
This thriller has great character development and is a well written book you'll love from the beginning.
D. Smolarek
This book really shows me New York city in at the turn of the century.
Julia Lutzke

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Christina Lockstein on June 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Murder in Chinatown by Victoria Thompson is the latest entry in the Gaslight mystery series. I've fallen in love with Thompson's tales of Knickerbocker turned midwife Sarah Brandt and her ally Detective Frank Malloy, and while this tale doesn't satisfy on every point, it's definitely a good read. Sarah is summoned to Chinatown to attend the birth of Cora Lee, a Irish girl who's married a Chinese businessman. Sarah soon meets the rest of the Lee family with both its Irish and Chinese roots and sees the effects of American xenophobia. Chinese women are not allowed in the US, so Chinese men marry Irish girls who are hoping for something more than life in a tenement and aren't afraid to face the racism they will face with their mixed marriage. When Cora's biracial niece, Angel, disappears, Sarah does her best to investigate without infuriating Malloy who wants her to stay out of trouble. Sarah's newly acquired daughter Catherine encourages her to watch her own safety as well. Maybe that's why this story has a little less teeth than previous entries. Soon, Angel turns up dead, and Malloy is on the case, both to make sure it is solved in New York's climate of ignoring crimes against minorities and to ensure that Sarah stays out of it. Thompson has created considerable heat between her lead characters in previous books, but in this one, only a few glances are exchanged. Perhaps because Sarah and Malloy are thinking so much about each other, they miss the obvious clues to the real killer, or maybe Thompson is making a statement about how judging purely on appearance can lead to tragic consequences. The climax is powerful as both Malloy and Sarah realize what they have missed. The denouement promises interesting things to come for the Gaslight series. I can only hope for a little more romance and a little more excitement.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Feicht on February 8, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Midwife Sarah Brandt is thrust into yet another mystery while delivering a baby. The daughter of a Chinese businessman and his Irish wife goes missing. Sarah asks Detective Sergeant Mulloy for insight into how to find the girl. What she finds is murder and it takes both Sarah and Mulloy to solve the mystery. The fascinating backdrop of New York's Chinatown as the twentieth century looms, is the main character of the book. Thompson steeps her series in history but you never know there is a history and sociological lesson within the pages. The only reason five stars wasn't given, is that the murderer is apparent with still 100 pages to go.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Schwartz on February 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is another good enty in the Victoria Thompson Gaslight Mystery Series. In this book we get to see a little bit about what life was like in turn-of-the-century New York City for its many Chinese immigrants. I enjoy Ms. Thompson's characters. Sarah Brandt gets better with each outing and the romantic link between her and Frank Malloy gets stronger. Sarah is called upon to help find a young Chinese girl when she is in Chinatown delivering a baby, but before the police can help to bring her home, she is found dead in an alley. Sarah enlists the aid of Detective Frank Malloy to help the family track down a killer. Although I figured out the killer before the end of the book, I still enjoyed this story. This is a very enjoyable historical read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Haslacher on April 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This series fascinated me from the very first story. The characters are believable to the time period and the rich historical nuggets about New York City in the 1890's (a character in its own right) is strewn throughout the story without being a history dump. The relationship between Sarah and Frank is a slow burn and just as interesting as the mystery itself. I am eagerly awaiting the latest in the series---May can't come soon enough! If you are a fan of history, a good mystery with a sideline of romance, then Victoria Thompson is the author for you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Donna Harper on March 4, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I give this book 5 stars for the way the author started out to keep Sarah out of trouble. Love how love is seeking in. It is not too goory,bloody. Just enough about the murders to keep me interested. She gave a lot of insights into Chinese culture. Sarah is a cannot be stopped girl.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ria Darling VINE VOICE on May 21, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am a huge fan of this series and always learn something about NYC from these books-this time it's about Chinatown and the US immigration policy. I really had no idea about this history of Chinatown or the life of early Chinese immigrants or the Irish women with whom they intermarried. This title will certainly stand alone, but the series is enjoyable enough to start at the beginning. However, like another reviewer, I solved the mystery about 1/2 way through and that was frustrating. I'll continue to read the series because of her historical setting but this isn't the strongest title in the series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Armchair Interviews on July 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Victoria Thompson is the author of numerous historical novels. Murder in Chinatown is part of her Gaslight Mystery series.

Sarah Brandt is a widow, an adoptive mother, a nurse/midwife and a part-time sleuth--much to Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy's dismay. That dismay makes for a nice, yet uneasy alliance between him and Brandt.

Brandt travels to Chinatown to deliver a baby. The neighborhood abounds with Irish women who entered the United States through Ellis Island, are alone and have married Chinese men.

While in Chinatown, 15-year-old Angel goes missing. She's half-Chinese and half-Irish. It appears she's wasn't willing to participate in an arranged marriage with a much older Chinese man and ran away. Brandt begins to help the family in their search for Angel and when Angel is found murdered, she brings Malloy into the case.

It's up to Malloy and Brandt to penetrate the private world of Chinatown to solve the murder and bring the murderer to justice. It's a delicate job that just might get Brandt or the people she cares about murdered.

This is my first mystery by Victoria Thompson and it won't be the last. While I'm not always fond of historical mysteries, I found fascinating the historical perspective of the police taking reward money from victim's families. I had no idea there was a population of New York Irish women who married Chinese men and had no idea of the issues they and their children faced.

The characters are believable, interesting and unique and the plot is compelling. I don't think I've ever mentioned a book cover in a review before, but Murder in Chinatown's cover is a work of art. People will pick up the book just because of the cover, and I suspect it will add to the author's sales.

Armchair Interviews says: Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?