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Murder in Mumbai: A Dutton Guilt Edged Mystery (Dutton Guilt Edged Mystery, A) Kindle Edition

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Length: 184 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 769 KB
  • Print Length: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton (July 17, 2012)
  • Publication Date: July 17, 2012
  • Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007FEPP4K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #891,078 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mary Lavers (in Canada) on July 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
In a strange way, Murder in Mumbai reminds me of William X. Kienzle's The Rosary Murders. A cop and a reporter compete--and at times co-operate--to solve a murder in their gritty city against a backdrop of changing religious hierarchy. Except in The Rosary Murders, the city is Detroit in the 1970's, the religious hierarchy is the Catholic church, and the culture is reeling from the recent civil rights movement and Vatican reform. In Murder in Mumbai, the city is Mumbai, India, the hierarchy is the caste system, and the culture is shifting as it adjusts to the new Mumbai in what was once the old Bombay. The movie version might star Frieda Pinto rather than Donald Sutherland but I could definitely see it as a gritty police drama.

Though Murder in Mumbai is short (it comes in at just 169 pages on my Kobo, including introductory pages) I felt I really got a sense of life in the fast-paced and ever-changing city of Mumbai. The murder mystery storyline was accessible and relatively easy to follow, though, like The Waterman's Daughter, the real star of the novel was the setting itself.

For more reviews, please visit my blog, CozyLittleBookJournal.

Disclaimer: I received a digital galley of this book free from the publisher from NetGalley. I was not obliged to write a favourable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By TChris TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Murder in Mumbai is a police procedural -- or maybe a journalist procedural -- set in modern Mumbai. Two men burglarizing an apartment find a body in a trunk. Inexplicably, they decide to dispose of the body in a garbage dump rather than leaving it where they found it. The dead woman was the CEO of a corporation. Among the murder suspects are the woman's unfaithful husband, a ruthless competitor, and a subordinate whose career benefited from the woman's death.

The best murder mysteries plant clues that give the reader a chance to solve the murder. Krishnadev Calamur makes a clumsy attempt to do so, but given that the improbable motive for the murder isn't revealed until the closing pages, a reader spotting the murderer will be relying on guesswork rather than detective skills. Still, the straightforward plot is moderately interesting.

The same cannot be said of the novel's characters. The two central characters are stereotypes. Inspector Vijay Gaikwad is the honest cop surrounded by corruption and bureaucracy. Jay Ganesh is the fiercely dedicated crime reporter, a veteran print journalist who complains that the new kids at the paper don't know how to write. His investigation provides Gaikwad with the break he needs to solve the murder. But for their enjoyment of chai tea and biscuits, the two characters might as well be Americans. They are thin and unoriginal, lacking in personality.

Calamur strives to be profound in his observations of evolving Mumbai and insightful in his comments about human nature but rarely rises above the obvious. Gaikwad's supposed pride in the self-confidence of modern women in Mumbai seems more like the author's commentary on a changing country than a realistic character trait.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TMDG on September 19, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
The overall plot was interesting. The descriptions about the setting, classes, its customs and traditions, I have to admit, felt like I was reading a textbook. That isn't necessarily bad, I felt like I learned some things. I found myself skipping through some of the descriptions , as I felt like it was repetitive information. I admired the integrity and honesty of the main characters Gaikwad and Ganesh on their journey to solve the mystery of who murdered Liz Barton, not willing to just come up with an answer, but wanted to come up with the right answer. I would have liked them to have more personality though. I had no idea who the murderer was, and couldn't even guess. At the end, it's like "Ohhh, now I get it." There were motives for her murder presented through the story, but the actual motive wasn't revealed until the end.
It definitely wasn't a waste of time, but I didn't find it to be exceptional.
I was given this book for free in exchange for a review.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ShoreGirl on August 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Murder in Mumbai
by Krishnadev Calamur

This is a straightforward, old fashioned, who done it murder mystery which I thoroughly enjoyed! Calamur has written a good story set in modern day India. He makes you feel that you are really there with his descriptions of the sights, sounds and smell of the town.

The story opens when two robbers literally fall over a dead female body in the apartment that they are going to rob and decide that their best of course of action is to dispose of the body because, after all who would believe that they didn't kill her. Of course, to complicate matters, the body is that of a western female who happens to be the CEO of an important company. So they take matters into hand and dispose of the body where they think that surely it will never be found. The gods, and India's weather, are against them. So the story begins. An honest cop, a disgraced journalist, a jaded environmentalist, and some guilt ridden crooks make for a wonderful story line.

Calamur has developed his characters beautifully. Yes, there is corruption in the Indian police force, but that is not so unusual in India is it ? Gaikwad, the police investigator is doing the best that he can with a system that he cannot change and in the process garners respect from his peers and with that comes an ability to solve a crime. Gaikwad does it the old fashioned way, through dogged, hard police work. It's interesting that the procedure to solve crime does not change from country to country.

Jay Ganesh the disgraced journalist is working at the equivalent of the The Enquirer because he exposed corruption and would not back down. He is determined to get back in the game of real news reporting and with help to and from Gaikwad manages to do that.
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