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Murder Suicide: A Novel (Frank Clevenger) Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook, CD


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Product Details

  • Series: Frank Clevenger (Book 5)
  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Macmillan Audio; Abridged edition (July 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593974280
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593974282
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 5.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,914,355 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Number five in Ablow's Dr. Frank Clevenger series (after 2003's Psychopath) continues the forensic psychiatrist's insightful investigations into intricate and deadly puzzles. Called in by a stumped Boston police department, Clevenger applies his skills to the mystery surrounding genius inventor John Snow, who is found shot outside Massachusetts General Hospital just an hour before he is to undergo experimental brain surgery. The police want Clevenger to determine if the death is murder or suicide. When Snow's lover, Grace Baxter, is found several days later with a slashed throat and wrists, the question surfaces again. Clevenger is a meticulous procedural investigator; he and partner North Anderson follow each and every lead to its logical, if sometimes tedious, conclusion. Clevenger's métier is interviewing suspects, and there's a surplus of them as family, friends and enemies, any one of whom could have killed the eccentric Snow, parade through the pages. Clevenger's problematic personal life is again examined in detail: adopted 18-year-old Billy is still challenging Clevenger's shaky parenting skills, and Clevenger's love affair with FBI chief forensic psychiatrist Whitney McCormick is always on-again, off-again. Drugs and alcohol, two other demons from his past, wait in the wings. Clevenger agonizes over all of this while methodically solving the riddle of Snow's murder, playing each of the suspects against the other until he tricks a confession out of the guilty party. While the excitement is not exactly pulse pounding, Clevenger puts in some solid sleuthing, and the low body count is refreshing amid a sea of frenetic thrillers in which victims number in double digits.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Murder Suicide poses intriguing questions...When Clevenger calls everyone into the room at the end, his solution and its surprising twist reminds us of the best of Rex Stout's master-manipulator, Nero Wolfe. And that's only one of the good reasons to pick up this tightly plotted book."—San Antonio Express News on Murder Suicide
 
“Only Thomas Harris does it more stylishly.” —Kirkus Reviews on Psychopath

“You can see why...Ablow is compared to Thomas Harris.” —Entertainment Weekly on Psychopath

“The suspense is riveting and the outcome surprising in this first-rate thriller.” —Washington Post Book World on Compulsion

Customer Reviews

Don't insult my intelligience.
M. Foss
It seems OK so far, but there are so many mistakes that they interrupt the flow of the book.
Amazon Customer
This thriller has prize-winner written all over it.
"redcats"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book was okay. It started out with an intriguing scene, in which it was unclear if Snow had been murdered or committed suicide, then continued through the investigation. Snow was well portrayed - a man who alienated friends and family through his demands for perfection, and whose demands on himself were so great they actually caused him to have seizures. However, the book never really gripped me the way Ablow's prior book, Psychopath, did. This book felt scattered, awfully slow at times, and I had a hard time making sense out of the key characters' actions or beliefs. Snow's decision to escape his life never quite rang true, somehow. This book did not have the original look inside the killer's mind which made Psychopath so exceptional. Also, the ending felt contrived. I did not get any sense of chemistry between Clevenger and Whitney this time, and the travel and scenery, which were excellent in Psychopath, were not well portrayed here. I look forward to Ablow's next book, and hope it is better than this one.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Cory D. Slipman on September 21, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Keith Ablow's "Murder Suicide" featuring forensic pathologist and psychiatrist Dr. Frank Clevenger is a thankfully fast reading but mediocre murder mystery.

Dr. John Snow, a brilliant aerospace engineer and inventor on the verge of undergoing radical neurosurgery to correct debilitating lifelong seizures, is found shot outside the hospital an hour before the procedure. Boston detective Mike Coady calls in Clevenger when it is indeterminate as to whether this was a case of suicide or murder.

Snow was on the threshhold of a breakthrough in revolutionary stealth missile technology which would provide a huge financial windfall for his company and partner Collin Corroway. The unhappily married Snow was being inspired in his thought processes by his mistress gorgeous but troubled and also married art dealer Grace Baxter. Apparently Snow's surgery to be performed by accomplished neurosurgeon Dr. Jet Heller, had the potential to cause selective amnesia as a byproduct. Snow would lose the memories of all those that had a part in his life, family and lover included.

Fantastically Baxter herself was found days after Snow's demise, apparently having taken her own life by slashing her wrists and neck. Questions arose as to whether she also might have been murdered.

Ablow conveniently bestowed upon all the peripheral characters in this book including Snow's wife, son and daughter, business partner, Baxter's husband George Reese and even Dr. Heller enough financial and emotional baggage to make them strong suspects in Snow's murder. Clevenger must wade through all the rhetoric to solve this improbable case. Ablow's conclusion is melodramatic and ridiculously farfetched.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bookreporter on July 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Keith Ablow's lifelong interest has been to determine what markers or kind of trauma brings a person to the breaking point. He has testified as an expert in some of America's most highly publicized trials." He writes both nonfiction (texts and medical tomes) and novels starring his alter ego, Frank Clevenger ("clever avenger" perhaps? But what's in a name?)

Clevenger is a forensic psychiatrist who is a consultant to the Boston police. In Ablow's latest, MURDER SUICIDE, Clevenger is asked to help unravel the events that led to the shooting death of Dr. John Snow, a brilliant fifty-year-old MIT scientist, found dead in an alley on his way to Massachusetts General Hospital. Snow was to undergo a very controversial neurosurgical procedure when he was found dead with a gun near the body. Murder? Suicide?

John Snow, Ph.D. suffered from epilepsy. He was plagued by grand mal seizures from which he would collapse, lose consciousness, and breathe like a bellows. His limbs would jerk wildly, his teeth clamping shut and sometimes tearing through his tongue. When he was 10, his parents, fearing a brain tumor, had him thoroughly examined and his "EEG told the story: clusters of delta and theta electrical spikes shooting through his temporal lobes, sparking up toward his frontal lobes. Bolts of inspiration gone wild. The more intensely he focused on what he loved --- inventing --- the more he suffered."

His professional career had been amazingly successful in spite of his handicap, but Snow had reached a point in his life when his most important and valuable secret military invention had to be completed --- an invention that could save the world or annihilate it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Larry Scantlebury on June 17, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Apparently I'm in a minority but, yawn, it was so tedious. I found the descriptions of where 'we were' to be sparse, almost nonexistent. Maybe they're in other novels. Boston is a helluva city. Read Spenser. Boston is like a fifth character, another subplot. You're there, man.

One reviewer commented that Clevenger appeared to be on the phone all the time. That was my read as well.

I recognize that Kellerman and White have made the forensic psychiatric murder milieu a virtual cottage industry. Maybe that's my problem. I don't get into it. Seems too unbelivable. All those patients. All those murders. Whatever.

So my take was it was tedious, I didn't "feel" the environment, and I found the tricking of guilty people to be, incredible. As in not credible. 2 stars. Larry Scantlebury
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