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Murder for the Bride Unknown Binding – 1966


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Gold Medal; 5th printing edition (1966)
  • ASIN: B00193VOKM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,133,739 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Nicole Pellegrini on January 8, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This early novel from John D MacDonald, first published in 1951, is a fast-paced and easy read from an author who would become of the legends of the crime/suspense writing world. While today it may seem a bit dated, particularly in its choice of villains, it's still a story that will grab the reader's attention and keep you riveted through each and every plot twist.

And the plot twists sure do keep coming at a lightning pace throughout this story, right from the opening pages. Our protagonist, Dillon Bryant, is a successful engineer off on assignment after just finishing his honeymoon. News from home comes that his new bride, Laura, a beautiful women whom he had only met weeks before proposing marriage, is in deep trouble. He rushes home to find out that she has, in fact, been murdered. Filled with grief and rage, he feels he cannot leave it up to the police to solve the case - he wants his own kind of revenge against the killer.

To reveal more at this point would be to give away too much of the plot. Suffice to say it involves everything from the seamy side of New Orleans, to the Red Scare, to former Nazis on the lam, and a spunky newspaper reporter who we know from fairly early on is the one Dillion *should* be married to - but it may take a very long time for either of them to figure that out, if they both manage to survive.

MacDonald shows his craft in the swift pacing of the story, the way he easily describes action, scenes and characters with brevity and well-chosen details. He brings his world to life for readers and draws you into his characters' plights and dramas quickly, keeping you turning the pages to find out what will happen to them next. While I wouldn't rate this as one of MacDonald's best works by far, it is certainly worth reading if you are a fan of his writing, or looking for a good story quite typical of the time period in which it was written.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jim Lester on December 16, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
John D. MacDonald is one of the genuine treasures in the world of American popular literature. His career included a stint as a pulp writer in the late 1940s as well as being one of the pioneers in the golden age of paperback originals in the 1950s and 1960s. He is primarily known for the long running Travis McGee novels, which critics consider one of the best P.I. series of all time.

This book is one of MacDonald's paperback novels from the early 1950s and it contains many of the elements that made him such an outstanding writer. The plot has lots of twists and turns, the characters are interesting and varied and the setting (New Orleans) is vivid and important to the story. The plot centers on an oil contractor who marries a woman he barely knows. When his bride is murdered while he's on business in Mexico, he comes back to New Orleans, vowing to find the killer.

What he finds is a complex conspiracy involving the Communist Party, more murders and a mysterious McGuffin that drives the plot to an exciting conclusion. MacDonald avoids the political commentary that dominated the era in which the book was written and instead focuses on action and suspense. Although the novel was written over half a century ago, it holds up remarkably well and serves as both an example of a historical document and an exciting piece of escapist fiction. No wonder those old paperback originals sold so well back in the fifties.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love this guys work. Wish I had met him while he was still alive. He is as good as Hemmingway
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very interesting John D. MacDonald novel, not very different from his Travis Mcgee books with a hero and a mystery,
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