Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Musee du quai Branly: The Collection: Art From Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas
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on November 24, 2012
Hardback, embossed boards with illustrated DJ, 12" x 9.75", 480 pages, 185 tribal objects in color plates, (mostly) one item to each page, Four maps, showing where each item originated. Breakdown on the provenance of the items depicted. Notes on each item in the catalogue. Edited by Yves Le Fur. Quality paper, photography and presentation. Published by Flammarion/Musee Du Quai Branly, 2009.

This great books presnts sections on the tribal art of Africa, Asia, Oceania, and The Americas. The well respected tribal art critic Yves Le Fur provides a (short) introduction, and then the majority of the book showcases tribal objects from around the world, with a detailed description of each work. The book as a whole merits somewhere betwenn 4-stars and 5-stars - I have had the pleasure of visiting the Museee Du Quai Branly, and the book doesn't quite do the fabulous museum justice, but the presentation and quality of the book cause me to err on the positive side.
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on April 5, 2016
The Musée du Quai Branly, Paris is the ultimate museum display revealing concocted versions of Western twaddle. Invariably, the du Quai Branly is a culmination of a decade-long, 232 million € (Eurodollar) project embroiled in history and encircled by controversy even prior to opening in 2006.

When will the Western world humble itself and allow others to convey their own stories ... Or even rightful legitimacy??
---------------

This is a grim reminder of the problems Cheikh Anta Diop had with his doctoral thesis, "Nations nègres et culture: De l'antiquité nègre égyptienne aux problèmes culturels de l'Afrique Noir", Diop brilliantly and factually presented data linking ancient Egypt to the rest of the African peoples and continent (resulting in future conclusive scientific proof through testing and other analysis). As far as Asia is concerned, the Musée du Quai Branly cannot be credited with making a representation of the art of that continent, it is already the function of the Musée Guimet in Paris - which incidentally also houses thousands of stolen and illegal objects - from China and the rest of Asia. It is also worth noting that Egyptian art and Islamic art is maintained at the Musée du Louvre and not the du Quai Branly - which is supposed to cover Africa and Asia.

(1). When did Egypt no longer become part of Africa, or are the French still following the 19th C. German philosopher Hegel's declaration: "Africa is no historical part of the world" and false belief that Egypt was never part of Africa??
(2). Or the Regius Professor of History at Oxford University, Hugh Trevor-Roper's openly racist views: "Africa has no history (expressed as recent as 1963)?
(3). Or is it because of perceived fear of melee occurring if Egyptian art is included with sub-Saharan African art; which has always been respected as representing a high civilization; with groups essentially considered as “primitive" ones?
(4). Aside from occasional exhibitions, contemporary / modern African art does not appear to be within the Musée du Quai Branly's criterion objectives since this would contradict the notion of “art premier” or “primitive art” - which is still at the core of the du Quai Branly - despite all *disclaimers* to the contrary.
(5). Or is modern African art not considered African art? Does so-called "traditional" African art - represented in the du Quai Branly - contain all that there is to "art" from sub-Saharan Africa??

... Destruction of Dogon areas and the damage caused by looting of artifacts cannot be ignored, even by the anthropologists - first under colonial rule and within the "Independence Period" all ending up in Western countries. No country that experienced colonialist aggression and imperialist domination can ever remain the same or wholly preserve its traditions. Frankly, there are more Dogon in the du Quai Branly than in the National Museum, Bamako! The unwillingness of the French even to consider restitution claims and other demands from Africans prompted Aminata Traoré, a former Minister of Culture from Mali and author of "La Gloire des imposteurs (DOCUMENT) (French Edition)" and "L'Afrique humiliée (Documents) (French Edition)" to issue her famous statement on the occasion of the opening of the Musée du Quai Branly: "In our opinion, the Musée du Quai Branly is built on a deep and painful paradox since almost the totality of the Africans, Amerindians, the Australian Aborigines whose talents and creativity are being celebrated, will never cross the doorstep of the museum in view of the so-called selective immigration. It is true that measures have been taken to ensure that we can consult the archives via Internet. Thus our works of art have a right of residence at a place where we are forbidden to stay".

Another example (of many) - which contrasts sharply with the *du Quai Branly approach* - directly addresses the reality that there are either not enough or no "black" voices in France which could be valuable on issues which involve minorities. Quite clearly the du Quai Branly was devised and built without reaching out to minorities - justifying that "non-whites" lack organization and consciousness -- and that the museum would not have a direct impact on "non-white" French and others. Yet, the principle concern being that "non-white" nations will *ask for their stolen treasures back* rather than motivations conveying ethnic pride and identity. LOL...

The French - who consider themselves very logical - twist facts to suit their own dubious classifications, while continually broadcasting *René Descartes (1596-1650) reasoning*, along with rogue colonial acuity that has been prolifically spread throughout the world. Europeans and Americans now argue that these works are part of the "Patrimony of Humanity" (UNESCO) and are better preserved in Europe or within the U.S.A. The rest of the world is finally arriving at the (obvious) conclusion that Europeans and Americans have become the victims of their own propaganda and cannot bring themselves to accept any mistakes or failures... "Supposedly faultless, without cause célèbre."
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on June 29, 2014
A good "Museum Book" enough content to inspire a visit or serve as a memory of a visit made. Out of necessity the range of items and information is limited and one questions occasionally the choice made by museum staff in picking their exhibit as a feature. A visually quite pleasing book to assign to the coffee table. The photography is adequate but uninspired. With such a large collection to choose from this book would inevitably have been a challenge and in all fairness a good effort has been made.
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on January 7, 2010
The Musee du Quai Branly is one of the most unique and appealing museums on the planet. My primary focus is on African art, and this collection is a "must see" in Paris,along with a few others pieces that remain at the Louvre. Each piece of art in this book represents the epitome of refinement for it's particular tribe from the Bamana fertility figure on the cover to the Cameroon anthropromorphic mask(Bamileke)and so on. I love this book. It would definitely be on my top 10 list. The text accompanying each photograph is much more than a descriptive analysis. It's beautifully written and tells a story that brings to life the use and context of each piece in its original role within the tribe, and an analysis of the images and motifs, as well as the influence these artistic creations on other cultures as they became exposed in Europe beginning around the 14th to 15th century.
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on November 10, 2013
Hardback, embossed boards with illustrated DJ, 12" x 9.75", 480 pages, 185 tribal objects in color plates, (mostly) one item to each page, Four maps, showing where each item originated. Breakdown on the provenance of the items depicted. Notes on each item in the catalogue. Edited by Yves Le Fur. Quality paper, photography and presentation. Published by Flammarion/Musee Du Quai Branly, 2009.

Sections on the tribal art of Africa, Asia, Oceania, and The Americas. The well respected tribal art critic Yves Le Fur provides a (short) introduction, and then the majority of the book showcases tribal objects from around the world, with a detailed description of each work. The book as a whole merits somewhere betwenn 4-stars and 5-stars - I have had the pleasure of visiting the Museee Du Quai Branly, and the book doesn't quite do the fabulous museum justice, but the presentation and quality of the book cause me to err on the positive side.
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on June 23, 2016
Great book for research on African Tribal Art...very informative
Extensive information & pictures on this important Museum
Well packed, shipped quickly
Great seller....Thanks!!!
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on May 6, 2010
The Good News: This book is a masterpiece in photography of the objects. The written explanations are excellent. The coverage of all tribal segments of the Branly is second to none. It is a bargain at Amazon.com.

The Bad News: This book coverage of all tribal segments of the Branly means individual segments (for me, African) are reduced to roughly a quarter of the book. I would welcome a book of this caliber dealing with each tribal art area at the Branly. Otherwise this would have been a 5-star book, and is highly recommended.
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