Qty:1
  • List Price: $23.95
  • Save: $5.93 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Music Notation (Crescendo Book) Paperback – May 1, 1979


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.02
$16.04 $11.42


Frequently Bought Together

Music Notation (Crescendo Book) + Essential Dictionary of Music Notation: The Most Practical and Concise Source for Music Notation (The Essential Dictionary Series) + Essential Dictionary of Orchestration: Ranges, General Characteristics, Technical Considerations, Scoring Tips: The Most Practical and Comprehensive R (Essential Dictionary Series)
Price for all three: $30.54

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Crescendo Book
  • Paperback: 482 pages
  • Publisher: Taplinger Pub Co; 2nd edition (May 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0800854535
  • ISBN-13: 978-0800854539
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #486,937 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

And this definitely applies to computer musical notation.
Dr H
I have a degree in Music and I have learned more from this book about music notation than I ever did in music school.
LoveGuitar
This book covers everything you need to know about traditional music notation.
Bradley Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By efgoldman on April 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
I had two courses with Prof. Read in the mid-1960's, and of course his notation book was required for both.

He was everything the negative reviewers say: pretentious, overbearing, and condescending. He was also a fantastic teacher, meticulous and extremely demanding.

In those days, remember, there were no desktop computers and software to write and print music. Everything, even printed scores, was hand-written and -engraved. Part of the music school experience was learning to write manuscript correctly, legibly and uniformly. In this Prof. Read and his book were indispensable.

Interestingly, in this age when textbook prices are rising faster than the price of gasoline, this edition of Prof. Read's book is *half* the price of the original trade paperback that i bought almost forty years ago.

Are there better books now? Probably. And in this computer age, there's a question whether books like this are even necessary. But this is a classic of its kind, and should be on every music student's, composer's, arranger's and copyist's (if ther are any left) desk.

efg
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bradley Smith on January 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book covers everything you need to know about traditional music notation. It will serve as an excellent reference. Though the book might take some time to get through, it is definitely worth reading in its entirety at least once if you plan to write or arrange music of any kind.
A number of reviewers have recomended the "Norton Manual of Music Notation" instead of this book. I would suggest it in addition to this book as they cover different topics. This book is about the meaning and history of notation. The Norton Manual is a practical guide to writing out music by hand.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By S. Layton on June 14, 2002
Format: Paperback
My main composition professor at university was (and still is) a stickler for good, precise, consistent, and clear notation. He should know; besides his own scores (beautifully done, even though filled with many difficult and novel notations), he's also worked on the side for the last thirty years making clean beautiful copies of scores and parts for others. This book was what he insisted we all learn from, and is still considered as his own primary reference today. There aren't many questions of standard usage it doesn't cover (both current and historical), and it distills many of the more unusual indications that began to be used in contemporary music. Each composer will find their own usage and innovation, but thorough study of this book will ensure that a real, solid foundation of the fundamentals of notational clarity will be at their command for whatever they want to do.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 30, 1997
Format: Paperback
This amazingly thorough book covers every problem, concern or question that can ever come up in a musician's mind. Whether you are a performer, composer, arranger, or just interested in music notation, this book is perfect for reference.
After a brief history of music notation's development through the Middle Ages, Mr. Read systematically examines every part of notation, giving plenty of examples and also providing new innovations in that area. Every chapter is well organized, and the reference tables are a particularly helpful resource.
Being a young composer, I found this book extremely valuable for providing me with the knowledge that, although essential to all musical fields, is rarely taught in any manner. A must buy for all musicians.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have had this book on my reference shelf for over twenty years. While it hasn't answered every question I've ever had about music notation, it has always at least pointed me in the right direction. Anyone interested in putting music on paper should own this book--and read it.
(I also think that this book will most certainly outlast--"Pentatonic Scales for the Jazz-Rock Keyboardist" by Jeff Burns. At least Mr. Read has something to be pretentious about.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
As others have said, this book is extremely extensive. It covers just about every notational circumstance (available up to the mid sixties that is) in great detail. This is my number one reccommendation for a notation book.

However, the section on Jazz is absolutely horrible, and offensive. Not only does it contain numerous flaws, it is missing a ton of stuff that the Jazz composer needs to notate. Also, it is offensive in that he refers to most Jazz music as "not serious." The book would be almost perfect if they would just leave the Jazz section out altogether. He apparently did not take very much time researching Jazz compositions (I don't think he every looked at one!) and did not put an importance on that chapter.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Robertson on September 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I realize that music is a far broader field than one person can encompass. But I also realize that there are plenty of people who are well-versed in all fields of music who would be glad to help a person who is writing a book on the subject. Read obviously did not consult anybody.

Read could not have thought very much of recorder consort music. Otherwise, he would have given the subject more than the cursory glance on pages 339-340. He also could not have played in a recorder consort. Otherwise, he would know that the tenor sounds as written and the bass sounds an octave higher than written, contrary to the misinformation which he gave us.

The discussion on string instruments isn't razor sharp either. The greatest blooper is on page 387, where we see a sample of fingered harmonics at the fifth. This would require an unrealistically wide stretch, so nothing like this would appear even in solo music. Any violinist consulted by Read would have caught this mistake in a jiffy.

Now I see that Joel Fass and Joe Lewis have similar comments on the chapter on jazz. Do mistakes of this sort run through the entire book?

I don't know very much about woodwinds and brasses. If Read misrepresented the recorder family, the string family, and jazz instruments so badly, can I rely on what Read told us about woodwinds and brasses?

Most orchestration books begin with a list of musicians of different specialties whom the author had consulted. Why doesn't this book? efgoldman tells us that Dr. Read was "pretentious, overbearing, and condescending." That could be the reason.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?